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NEWS
June 23, 1989 | Hot Topic responses were gathered by Angela Conner, John Doney, Roxanne Dyrud, Rebecca Leung and Heather Orey
Your first thrill ride as a child was, undoubtedly, spinning yourself in circles until you fell over from dizziness. Nowadays, big bucks are spent to have something do the twirling for us. So what provides us with the best thrills? Hot Topics wonders: "What's the best amusement park ride of all time? Why?" "Free Fall at Magic Mountain is the best amusement park ride of all time." Becky Williams, 16, junior, Bethel Baptist "Space Mountain at Disneyland, because it's dark and fast."
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2010
Some Halloween horror events in and around Los Angeles Universal Studios Hollywood, Halloween Horror Nights 1000 Universal Center Drive, L.A. 7 p.m., closing hours vary. Saturday, Oct. 15-17, 21-24, 28-31. $44 to $89. (800) 864-8377; http://www.universalstudioshollywood.com . Knott's Scary Farm Halloween Haunt Thirteen themed mazes and seven spooky live shows make this one of the most loved Halloween events in the area. 8039 Beach Blvd.
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MAGAZINE
September 17, 1995
Patt Morrison's last line in "Rate That Tune" (On the Town, Aug. 6) confirms my belief that she has special insight to the wonderful absurdities of things American. Who else would think to point out that the political, economic and military colossus called the United States of America has a national anthem in waltz time? HERSCHEL PURVIS Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2010 | By Richard Rayner, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In 1939, with Europe already sinking into World War II, 46-year-old Henry Miller left Paris, knowing that a cycle of his life had come to an end. As an expatriate in Paris he'd found his voice, and published the novels — "Tropic of Cancer," "Black Spring" and "Tropic of Capricorn" — which made his name. He'd had his legendarily steamy and dangerous affair with Anais Nin, and George Orwell had fired a salute on his behalf, hailing him as "a Whitman among the corpses." Miller, although banned in America, had arrived, and then, restless as ever, he accepted the invitation of another writer, his friend Lawrence Durrell, to visit Greece and the island of Corfu.
NEWS
July 6, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
It has no fingers, but a one-ton chunk of limestone hauled from the sea Sunday off the Greek island of Rhodes looked enough like a clenched fist to prompt excited government officials to speculate that divers had found a part of the Colossus of Rhodes--a fabled giant statue that was one of the seven wonders of the ancient world.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2010
Some Halloween horror events in and around Los Angeles Universal Studios Hollywood, Halloween Horror Nights 1000 Universal Center Drive, L.A. 7 p.m., closing hours vary. Saturday, Oct. 15-17, 21-24, 28-31. $44 to $89. (800) 864-8377; http://www.universalstudioshollywood.com . Knott's Scary Farm Halloween Haunt Thirteen themed mazes and seven spooky live shows make this one of the most loved Halloween events in the area. 8039 Beach Blvd.
NEWS
July 15, 2001 | Associated Press
More rank-and-file managers would prefer to run Wal-Mart Stores Inc. than any other company in America, a new survey shows. Of the 500 business professionals polled by Brouillard Communications, 20% said they'd want to serve as head honcho of the Bentonville, Ark.-based discount retailer.
NEWS
March 10, 1996
Regarding Letters in Life & Style (Feb. 29), ENIAC was not the first electronic calculating machine. But it is considered the first computer because it was programmable. It took an army of assistants with hundreds of vacuum tubes hours to change its programming. Neither the British machine called Colossus nor the Atanasoff Berry Computer could accomplish this feat. This is why ENIAC is considered the first computer. MARK HARVEY Lake Hughes
NEWS
February 29, 1996
Re "When Computers Were Born" (Feb. 7): ENIAC in 1946 was not the world's first electronic computer. British military intelligence built one in December 1943, called the Colossus to decipher German military codes produced by [the coding machine] Enigma. Colossus, not ENIAC, was the "granddaddy of the Macs and PCs." This may be verified in "The Guinness Book of Records." RAYMOND H. FREEMAN Thousand Oaks According to your article, ENIAC, developed by John Mauchly and J. Presper Eckert between 1942 and 1945, was the world's first electronic computer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1987 | Herbert J. Vida
Lynn Sarkisian admits he's afraid of riding in big roller coasters. But he's not afraid to build them, albeit on a miniature scale. "I've been on a couple of real roller coasters," he said, while standing next to his miniature creation, "and I was scared to death." His biggest fright occurred years ago on the old Long Beach roller coaster when he slid off the seat and had to hold on for dear life. "I didn't enjoy the rides then, and I still don't enjoy them," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2010 | By Wendy Smith, Special to The Los Angeles Times
Golden Gate The Life and Times of America's Greatest Bridge Kevin Starr Bloomsbury Press: 216 pp., $23 Colossus Hoover Dam and the Making of the American Century Michael Hiltzik Free Press: 498 pp., $30 The Golden Gate Bridge and Hoover Dam are more than just icons of American engineering. They are Depression-era monuments that transformed not only California's physical landscape, but its social one as well. The bridge linked San Francisco to rural Marin County, hastening the consolidation of the Bay Area into a huge metropolis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2009 | By Patrick J. McDonnell
Hundreds of workers at a Sonoma County hospital are scheduled to go to the polls today in a bitter and closely watched union vote pitting the giant Service Employees International against an upstart rival. The balloting at Santa Rosa Memorial Hospital has drawn intense scrutiny in labor circles nationwide because of the nasty underlying conflict between the SEIU and its breakaway competitor, the National Union of Healthcare Workers. The NUHW doesn't yet have a single dues-paying member but is waging a David versus Goliath campaign against the behemoth SEIU, which boasts more than 2 million members nationwide, almost half in the healthcare sector.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2008 | From the Associated Press
For years, Spain's famed Prado museum had its suspicions about one of its most prized Goyas. Now the museum says it is certain the painting is not by the 18th century master. The Prado's announcement about "Colossus," a large oil painting depicting the torso of a giant bursting through the clouds as he marches above a terrified village, is causing a furor among experts, some of whom still believe the painting is genuine. Francisco de Goya y Lucientes' "Colossus" has always been one of the Prado's major attractions and a highlight of his series on Spain's war against Napoleon, whose troops invaded in 1808.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2007 | Jim Puzzanghera, Times Staff Writer
The chairman of the Senate's antitrust subcommittee Tuesday blasted the proposed merger of the country's two satellite radio providers, saying it would create a "business colossus" that would raise prices for listeners. "You have every right to ask ... but it's another thing to grant you that permission to be virtually unrivaled, unchallenged in this whole area," Sen. Herb Kohl (D-Wis.) said at the third hearing on Capitol Hill over the merger. "What a business!
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2003 | Carmela Ciuraru, Special to The Times
Novelist Colson Whitehead's latest, "The Colossus of New York," isn't a work of fiction, but it reads like a collection of stories in which his native city is both plot and protagonist. In short essays such as "Central Park," "Downtown" and "Times Square," the author riffs and ruminates on the place and its people. In his two novels, "The Intuitionist" and "John Henry Days," Whitehead displayed grand ambition.
SPORTS
December 17, 2001 | From Associated Press
Dominic Rhodes thought he could run for 200 yards. He settled for 177 and a victory. Rhodes scored two touchdowns and nearly set a Colt rookie rushing record as Indianapolis ended a five-game losing streak with a 41-27 victory over Atlanta on Sunday. "I finally got that 100-yard game that I've been looking for," Rhodes said. "I've been trying to get 200 for my O-line. It eluded me again." Rhodes' total, which came on 29 carries, was the highest single-game effort by a Colt rookie since 1956.
NEWS
February 6, 1997 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Right up till the end, she possessed an inimitable sense of style. The cerebral hemorrhage that would prove fatal occurred, after all, following her swim at the Ritz--not Gold's Gym, not the local Y. The Ritz. In Paris. Even in her final moments, Pamela Digby Churchill Hayward Harriman was a study in the fine--and some would say, rapidly evaporating--art of elegant personal expression: wrapping oneself in refinement, up to the very last second.
SPORTS
December 17, 2001 | From Associated Press
Dominic Rhodes thought he could run for 200 yards. He settled for 177 and a victory. Rhodes scored two touchdowns and nearly set a Colt rookie rushing record as Indianapolis ended a five-game losing streak with a 41-27 victory over Atlanta on Sunday. "I finally got that 100-yard game that I've been looking for," Rhodes said. "I've been trying to get 200 for my O-line. It eluded me again." Rhodes' total, which came on 29 carries, was the highest single-game effort by a Colt rookie since 1956.
NEWS
July 15, 2001 | Associated Press
More rank-and-file managers would prefer to run Wal-Mart Stores Inc. than any other company in America, a new survey shows. Of the 500 business professionals polled by Brouillard Communications, 20% said they'd want to serve as head honcho of the Bentonville, Ark.-based discount retailer.
BOOKS
June 3, 2001 | JOHN RHODEHAMEL, John Rhodehamel is Norris Foundation curator of American history at the Huntington Library and the editor of "The American Revolution: Writings From the War of Independence" (Library of America)
America's moment of global preeminence would be a fine time for a John Adams revival. Not only does the second president deserve the recognition he has rarely achieved but, strangely enough, much of what the man had to say can be addressed to our own generation, the feckless children of this wildly successful United States. We'd do well to listen to the cranky old New England prophet of limits and responsibility.
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