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August 8, 1991 | ALAN CITRON
The famous torch lady of Columbia Pictures Entertainment Co. got a new moniker Wednesday as the board unanimously voted to rename the company Sony Pictures Entertainment. The name change is designed to lessen confusion between the parent company and its two subsidiaries--Columbia Pictures and Tri-Star Pictures. It also raises the profile of Sony Inc., the Japanese electronics giant that acquired Columbia for $3.4 billion in 1989.
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BUSINESS
August 8, 1991 | ALAN CITRON
The famous torch lady of Columbia Pictures Entertainment Co. got a new moniker Wednesday as the board unanimously voted to rename the company Sony Pictures Entertainment. The name change is designed to lessen confusion between the parent company and its two subsidiaries--Columbia Pictures and Tri-Star Pictures. It also raises the profile of Sony Inc., the Japanese electronics giant that acquired Columbia for $3.4 billion in 1989.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1991 | ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Columbia Pictures Chairman Frank Price will look to pop icon Michael Jackson and a growing stable of veteran producers to revive the fortunes of the company he took over last year. At a press conference attended by his entire upper management team, Price revealed Friday that Jackson will star in a film produced by Anton Furst and written by Caroline Thompson and Larry Wilson. The project has no title or release date, but Price said it will include "music, dancing and action."
BUSINESS
February 27, 1991 | ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As part of its continuing expansion into software, Sony Corp. has announced the formation of Sony Electronic Publishing, a division devoted to video and computer technologies. The new company will produce and distribute products ranging from video games to computerized texts on compact disc. Characters owned by Sony could even pop up in comic books. Sony Electronic Publishing will be headquartered in New York.
BUSINESS
December 1, 1989 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS
In their first major appointment, Columbia Pictures Entertainment Co-chairmen Peter Guber and Jon Peters have named their longtime lawyer, Alan J. Levine, to the post of president and chief operating officer at Columbia's newly formed Filmed Entertainment Group. The move puts the 42-year-old Levine above Columbia Pictures President Dawn Steel in the company's hierarchy.
BUSINESS
August 9, 1991 | ALAN CITRON and LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Sony Corp. could move ahead as early as this winter with efforts to raise $2 billion to $3 billion by selling shares on the U.S. and Japanese stock markets, sources close to the company have confirmed. Sony reportedly would use the money to support its Sony Pictures Entertainment and Sony Music Entertainment divisions. The Japanese electronics giant has been in discussions with potential Wall Street backers for several months, according to sources. "I think they're serious," one source said.
NEWS
December 17, 1990 | JEANNINE STEIN
The Scene: Premiere benefit screening and party Thursday for "Look Who's Talking Too," the sequel to last year's Kirstie Alley/John Travolta comedy from Tri-Star that also features the voices of Bruce Willis, Roseanne Barr and Damon Wayans. After the screening at the Cineplex Odeon in Century City, there was a low-key party across the mall at disco palace Twenty/20, where stars and industry types hung out for a couple of hours.
BUSINESS
August 30, 1990 | JOHN LIPPMAN
Jonathan Dolgen has been named president of Columbia Pictures' film division, a newly created position that will give him broad powers in studio operations. Dolgen's appointment had been rumored for several weeks. For the past five years, he has been a top executive at 20th Century Fox, most recently as president of parent Fox Inc. and chairman of Twentieth Television.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1991 | KENNETH J. GARCIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not many cities with a population of 35,000 organize formal trade missions to Asia. But then, there are not many cities like Beverly Hills. The town's ritzy reputation and celebrity-rich environment will be key parts of the marketing campaign by city officials to business executives in Tokyo and Hong Kong.
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