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NEWS
January 21, 1988
John H. Mitchell, one of the first three employees of Screen Gems productions, forerunner of Columbia Pictures Television, died Tuesday of a heart attack at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. He was 66. Mitchell was a three-term president of the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences and Columbia's TV president from 1968 to 1977. During his tenure more than 100 television series and 50 TV movies or mini-series were produced for all the major networks.
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BUSINESS
April 10, 1999 | Bloomberg News
Sony Corp.'s Columbia Pictures Television said a Los Angeles jury awarded it $31.7 million in damages from a man whose TV stations aired the company's shows without permission. A U.S. District Court jury awarded Sony the damages after finding that C. Elvin Feltner Jr. infringed the company's copyrights. Three stations he controlled aired 440 episodes of "Who's the Boss," "Hart to Hart," "T.J. Hooker" and "Silver Spoons" after Sony canceled the stations' licenses to air the shows for nonpayment.
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BUSINESS
October 8, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Producer Settles With Law Firm, TV Unit: Philip L. DeGuere Jr. is receiving an undisclosed amount in settling his lawsuit against the powerful entertainment firm Ziffren, Brittenham & Branca and Columbia Pictures Television. The suit alleged that his television pilot "Triangle" was canceled in 1989 as part of a scheme to conceal payments related to CBS' hiring of Jeff Sagansky as its entertainment chief.
BUSINESS
August 17, 1988
Republic Pictures Corp. has named Laurie Levit executive vice president of Republic Pictures Productions. Levit previously was senior vice president-television movies and miniseries at Columbia Pictures Television.
BUSINESS
April 26, 1993 | KATHRYN HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Mel Harris joined Sony Pictures Entertainment last year, he knew he was taking on a tough job as president of the newly configured television group. The unit had been posting large profits from the sale of reruns of "Who's the Boss?" and "Married . . . With Children," but earnings were due to tumble in the fall of 1993 because of a dearth of fresh programs available for syndication.
BUSINESS
October 12, 1992 | ROBERT W. WELKOS and ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A long-running lawsuit involving some of Hollywood's most powerful players has led to accusations that CBS committed fraud when it hired entertainment President Jeff Sagansky. The Los Angeles Superior Court case, set for a hearing today, alleges that CBS abruptly canceled a television pilot called "Triangle" in 1989 as part of an elaborate scheme to conceal payments made in connection with bringing Sagansky on board at the network. Sagansky was chairman of TriStar Pictures at the time.
BUSINESS
October 8, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Columbia Pictures Acquires New World TV Unit: Columbia Pictures Television said it has formed a division, TriStar Television, and has signed a letter of intent to assume most of the TV program assets of New World Entertainment for an undisclosed price. TriStar TV will be headed by NWE President Jon Feltheimer. NWE produces four network TV series and is producing an upcoming miniseries and TV movie. Excluded from the deal are NWE divisions Marvel Productions and Learning Corp.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1991
In the name of fairness, I suggest that future reviews of theatrical performances include the location of the seat from which the critic saw the performance. I challenge you to go to the UCLA James A. Doolittle Theater, sit in the mezzanine section, Row B, and honestly write that you spent five totally enjoyable minutes during the production of "A Little Night Music" or anything else. The spacing between rows is so narrow that it takes an unspoken agreement from the persons sitting to your left and right, and their left and right and so on down the row, to shift knees simultaneously.
BUSINESS
May 8, 1991 | JOHN LIPPMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Columbia Pictures Television, in a risky marketing move, has begun giving away the reruns of the hit comedy series "Designing Women" to TV stations in exchange for the right to sell almost half of the commercial advertising time in the show.
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