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Columbia River

NEWS
July 6, 2003 | Joseph B. Frazier, Associated Press Writer
As the pilot boat Chinook pulls alongside the Japanese freighter Spring Leo, matching its cruising speed, both vessels rise and fall on the seas and swells of the Columbia River bar. A ladder drops over the freighter's side. Bar pilot Ellwood Collamore backs down the ladder, his feet on the rungs and hands on the ropes. Near the bottom, he waits for the Chinook to reach the height of a swell and swings onto the deck.
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NATIONAL
July 2, 2003 | From Associated Press
Christopher Swain, who swam the length of the Columbia River to protest pollution, finished his yearlong journey Tuesday. The 1,243-mile swim began at the river's source in Canada and ended with Swain pushing through 8- to 10-foot swells at the river's mouth in Astoria. "I was overwhelmed," Swain said Tuesday. "There was a moment when everything hit me." Swain conceived of the swim as a way to bring attention to the harm done to the river by dams, pollutants and other threats.
NEWS
October 20, 2002 | Linda Ashton, Associated Press Writer
Before the Grand Coulee Dam flattened Kettle Falls into Lake Roosevelt, back when the upper Columbia River ran thick with salmon each summer, tribes from across the region met here to fish, trade and socialize. "This is where people met, got married, had babies, settled disputes," said Patti Stone, water quality coordinator for the Colville Confederated Tribes' environmental trust office. "It was the second-largest fishery on the Columbia River."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2002 | LINDA ASHTON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
If the Black Rock reservoir ever gets built, Dick Prigmore says his little way-station out in the middle of nowhere will be buried under 700 feet of dirt. "I don't think I'll be alive by the time this thing is going to happen," says the 64-year-old owner of the Silver Dollar cafe-tavern-convenience store, which stands alone at the intersection of Washington 24 and 241.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 2001 | JEFF BARNARD, ASSOCIATED PRESS
After a spring and summer of chasing salmon with boat, motor and gill nets, Harold Blackwolf was savoring being back on a wooden scaffold over churning water, fishing the way his ancestors fished in a place they have come since the beginning of time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 2001 | LINDA ASHTON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
In the wind, Al Brown believes, he has found his best metaphor for God--invisible, powerful and unconcerned about whether you live or die. "And then some days you get to fly across the water," the 54-year-old windsurfer says with a broad smile. Brown and his wife, Nancy, Bostonians who teach at Harvard University, are spending their sixth summer in nature's wind tunnel--the Columbia River Gorge, a wide and ancient geologic cut in the Cascade Range.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2001 | LINDA ASHTON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Like a waiter carrying a tray of water glasses in a crowded restaurant, chief power dispatcher Greg Lange has the same goal: Get the water where it needs to go and don't spill any. "In a low-water year, it's a pretty precious commodity," he says. Lange, of course, doesn't shimmy around chairs and tables, but utilities are not unlike customers, and the seven dams on the mid-Columbia River might be compared with the cook's kitchen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2001 | From Times staff and wire reports
Twelve Roman Catholic bishops in the Pacific Northwest called Thursday for environmental stewardship in the Columbia River watershed, saying environmentalists and business interests need to work together to protect the common good of the region. The bishops from Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana and British Columbia issued the pastoral letter after four years of study.
NEWS
February 22, 2001 | From Associated Press
Four years ago, the Roman Catholic bishops of the Northwest saw in the Columbia River an opportunity to develop an international call to environmental justice among people of good will. In listening sessions, with correspondence and in their own deliberations, the bishops considered the opinions of 2,000 people who had something to say about the 1,200-mile-long river that connects everyone in this region.
NEWS
December 22, 2000 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With most of the West clamoring for energy generated on the massive Pacific Northwest hydropower system, the Clinton administration Thursday launched a $352-million-a-year plan for recovering salmon, which does not rule out taking down dams to halt the fish's plunge toward extinction.
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