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ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2003 | Don Shirley
"Four guys rent the ultimate party house next to Cape Canaveral, and prepare for an endless summer of babes, booze and rocket launches So read a press release for the play "Kegger," which opened Jan. 30 at the Complex in Hollywood. Uh-oh. Less than two days after the opening, the Columbia shuttle disintegrated. That evening's performance of "Kegger" was canceled.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2013 | By Steve Chawkins
C. Gordon Fullerton waited years for his chance to go into space but less than six minutes after the space shuttle Challenger took off in 1985, he was starting to rethink it. One of the Challenger's three main engines suddenly shut down and Fullerton, the mission's commander, didn't know whether the others would follow. "Absolutely, with no warning - kapow! - there was an immediate drop in acceleration," he later told reporters. "The red light came on, and there we were. " Fullerton and pilot Roy Bridges immediately dumped a load of surplus fuel, worked the two remaining engines harder, and maneuvered the Challenger into orbit just 45 miles lower than planned.
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NEWS
August 11, 1989 | JOHN CHANDLER, Times Staff Writer
NASA and Air Force officials warned Thursday that Edwards Air Force Base will be off limits to the public for Sunday morning's scheduled landing of the space shuttle Columbia, although nearby sites may provide a view of the craft to resolute fans. The nation's 30th shuttle mission is due to touch down sometime between 6 a.m. and 9 a.m., although the exact time will not be announced until 24 hours earlier.
WORLD
September 14, 2009 | Richard Boudreaux
Israelis witnessed the second act of a riveting tragedy Sunday when the crash of an F-16 fighter-bomber killed the pilot son of Ilan Ramon, the Israeli astronaut who died in the Columbia space shuttle disaster of 2003. Radio and television stations interrupted their programming to report the death of air force Lt. Assaf Ramon, 21, and convey emotional responses by the nation's leaders. Some newscasters wore black. "The Sky Has Fallen Twice," read the headline on Ynet, an online news site.
NATIONAL
May 21, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The first pieces of debris from the space shuttle Columbia have been loaned to private-sector researchers under a plan to make the orbiter available for study, NASA said. Unlike the remains of its sister shuttle Challenger, which was destroyed in a launch accident in 1986 and later buried in an abandoned missile silo, NASA decided to catalog each of the thousands of pieces of Columbia recovered from Texas and Louisiana and make them available for researchers who applied for access.
NATIONAL
August 6, 2003 | From Times Wire Services
NASA will follow recommendations by the independent board investigating the shuttle Columbia disaster to the letter and will make no effort to defend itself against findings that are expected to be harsh, a top space official said Tuesday. "There will be no effort whatsoever to argue or defend," Frederick Gregory, NASA's deputy administrator, told reporters at the Kennedy Space Center. "We will respond to each of the findings and recommendations.
WORLD
September 14, 2009 | Richard Boudreaux
Israelis witnessed the second act of a riveting tragedy Sunday when the crash of an F-16 fighter-bomber killed the pilot son of Ilan Ramon, the Israeli astronaut who died in the Columbia space shuttle disaster of 2003. Radio and television stations interrupted their programming to report the death of air force Lt. Assaf Ramon, 21, and convey emotional responses by the nation's leaders. Some newscasters wore black. "The Sky Has Fallen Twice," read the headline on Ynet, an online news site.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2013 | By Steve Chawkins
C. Gordon Fullerton waited years for his chance to go into space but less than six minutes after the space shuttle Challenger took off in 1985, he was starting to rethink it. One of the Challenger's three main engines suddenly shut down and Fullerton, the mission's commander, didn't know whether the others would follow. "Absolutely, with no warning - kapow! - there was an immediate drop in acceleration," he later told reporters. "The red light came on, and there we were. " Fullerton and pilot Roy Bridges immediately dumped a load of surplus fuel, worked the two remaining engines harder, and maneuvered the Challenger into orbit just 45 miles lower than planned.
NEWS
January 31, 1986 | From Reuters
Britain's first astronaut, Nigel Wood, flew to Houston today for intensive training in the space shuttle program despite Tuesday's Challenger disaster. Wood was due to make his first space flight as a payload specialist aboard the Columbia shuttle on June 24, a mission which is now in doubt. He left with Lt. Col. Richard Farrimond, his backup for the mission, from an air force base outside London.
NEWS
February 1, 1986 | From Reuters
Britain's first astronaut, Nigel Wood, flew to Houston Friday for intensive training in the shuttle program despite Tuesday's Challenger disaster. Squadron leader Wood was due to make his first space flight aboard the Columbia shuttle on June 24, a mission that is now in doubt. Wood is to serve as a payload specialist aboard Columbia, carrying out experiments involving a new British military satellite, Skynet-4.
NATIONAL
May 21, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The first pieces of debris from the space shuttle Columbia have been loaned to private-sector researchers under a plan to make the orbiter available for study, NASA said. Unlike the remains of its sister shuttle Challenger, which was destroyed in a launch accident in 1986 and later buried in an abandoned missile silo, NASA decided to catalog each of the thousands of pieces of Columbia recovered from Texas and Louisiana and make them available for researchers who applied for access.
NATIONAL
August 6, 2003 | From Times Wire Services
NASA will follow recommendations by the independent board investigating the shuttle Columbia disaster to the letter and will make no effort to defend itself against findings that are expected to be harsh, a top space official said Tuesday. "There will be no effort whatsoever to argue or defend," Frederick Gregory, NASA's deputy administrator, told reporters at the Kennedy Space Center. "We will respond to each of the findings and recommendations.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2003 | Don Shirley
"Four guys rent the ultimate party house next to Cape Canaveral, and prepare for an endless summer of babes, booze and rocket launches So read a press release for the play "Kegger," which opened Jan. 30 at the Complex in Hollywood. Uh-oh. Less than two days after the opening, the Columbia shuttle disintegrated. That evening's performance of "Kegger" was canceled.
NEWS
August 11, 1989 | JOHN CHANDLER, Times Staff Writer
NASA and Air Force officials warned Thursday that Edwards Air Force Base will be off limits to the public for Sunday morning's scheduled landing of the space shuttle Columbia, although nearby sites may provide a view of the craft to resolute fans. The nation's 30th shuttle mission is due to touch down sometime between 6 a.m. and 9 a.m., although the exact time will not be announced until 24 hours earlier.
SCIENCE
October 16, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A rocket carrying two Russian cosmonauts and an American astronaut to the International Space Station streaked into orbit Thursday, the latest flight of a Russian spacecraft to fill in for grounded U.S. shuttles. The new crew is made up of Russians Salizhan Sharipov and Yuri Shargin and American Leroy Chiao. NASA deputy administrator Fred Gregory said the U.S. was looking for "at least one more" crew rotation in a Soyuz flight.
NATIONAL
March 28, 2003
A U.S. Forest Service helicopter searching for Columbia space shuttle wreckage crashed near Broaddus, killing two people and injuring three, officials said. All five were aboard the chopper when it crashed, an official said, adding that the injured were taken to hospitals. The cause of the crash was not immediately known.
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