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Columbus America Discovery Group

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September 22, 2006 | By Jennifer James, Times Staff Writer
"Americans, both as individuals and as a nation, are characterized as spirited, optimistic, visionary, forward-thinking, adaptable, and entrepreneurial, traits symbolized by the pioneers, adventurers, and nation builders aboard the Central America. " ? "America's Lost Treasure," by Tommy Thompson FINDING the gold was only one challenge. Now the ship's treasure had to be brought to the surface. To retrieve it, Thompson and former colleague Don Hackman built what Thompson called "the ultimate erector set," a robot called Nemo.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2006 | By Jennifer James, Times Staff Writer
"Americans, both as individuals and as a nation, are characterized as spirited, optimistic, visionary, forward-thinking, adaptable, and entrepreneurial, traits symbolized by the pioneers, adventurers, and nation builders aboard the Central America. " ? "America's Lost Treasure," by Tommy Thompson FINDING the gold was only one challenge. Now the ship's treasure had to be brought to the surface. To retrieve it, Thompson and former colleague Don Hackman built what Thompson called "the ultimate erector set," a robot called Nemo.
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NEWS
April 11, 1990 | From United Press International
A Columbia University researcher Tuesday testified in federal court that his team located the gold-laden steamer Central America in 1984, four years before an Ohio team announced the discovery. William Ryan, a geologist for the New York university, said his team recorded a sonar reading in the Atlantic Ocean, showing an image corresponding to the dimensions of the 270-foot ship. Ryan testified in U.S.
NEWS
August 15, 1990 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge Tuesday awarded a small group of scientists and investors from Columbus, Ohio, sole ownership of the richest sunken treasure in history--more than $1-billion worth of bullion and coins from the gold fields of California. The ruling gives Columbus-America Discovery Group title to all gold and other artifacts recovered from the SS Central America, which sank in a hurricane 160 miles off the coast of the Carolinas in 1857.
NEWS
July 19, 1987 | From the Washington Post
A partnership of low-profile treasure hunters has laid claim to what they believe is one of America's most historic shipwrecks, a paddle-wheel steamer sunk in 1857 with about $450 million in gold coins from the California Gold Rush. The broken wreck of the Central America, a U.S. Mail steamship that went down in a hurricane with a loss of 428 lives, lies in 8,000 feet of water just within the 200-mile continental limit off the South Carolina coast, the Columbus America Discovery Group says.
NEWS
August 15, 1990 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge Tuesday awarded a small group of scientists and investors from Columbus, Ohio, sole ownership of the richest sunken treasure in history--more than $1-billion worth of bullion and coins from the gold fields of California. The ruling gives Columbus-America Discovery Group title to all gold and other artifacts recovered from the SS Central America, which sank in a hurricane 160 miles off the coast of the Carolinas in 1857.
NEWS
April 3, 1990 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the SS Central America broke apart in a hurricane and its passengers fought desperately to live, the fortunes harvested from California's gold fields no longer mattered. "The love of gold was forgotten in the anxiety and terror of the moment and many a man unbuckled his gold-stuffed belt and flung his hard-earned treasure upon the deck, some hoping to lighten their weight . . .
NEWS
November 19, 1993 | From Associated Press
Most of the $21 million in treasure from a ship that sank in 1857 was awarded Thursday to the salvagers who spent $30 million to find it. The judge said he wished it was worth more. "What a pity it did not amount to a billion dollars so that a proper award could have been given," U.S. District Judge Richard B. Kellam wrote in a decision giving 90% of the gold to the Columbus-America Discovery Group. The rest will go to the original insurers of the cargo.
NEWS
October 6, 1989 | From United Press International
A jubilant salvage crew hauled more than a ton of gold into port Thursday from the richest shipwreck in U.S. history--a sunken 19th-Century steamer with a trove worth up to $1 billion. "Gold. Lots of it," shouted Bob Evans, project director for the Columbus America Discovery Group, as hundreds cheered, snapped pictures and craned their necks to get a view of the gold. "It's been a long time getting here--132 years," Evans said in reference to the Sept.
BOOKS
May 31, 1998 | RICHARD ELLIS, Richard Ellis is the author of "The Search for the Giant Squid" and "Imagining Atlantis," both scheduled for publication this year
The dream of every writer of nonfiction (certainly mine) is to find a subject that is intrinsically fascinating, will seize the imagination of almost everybody and has never been written about before. With "Ship of Gold in the Deep Blue Sea," Gary Kinder has hit the jackpot. In September 1857, the paddle-wheel steamer Central America departed from Panama for New York carrying 600 passengers, many of whom were gold miners returning from California with newfound riches.
NEWS
April 11, 1990 | From United Press International
A Columbia University researcher Tuesday testified in federal court that his team located the gold-laden steamer Central America in 1984, four years before an Ohio team announced the discovery. William Ryan, a geologist for the New York university, said his team recorded a sonar reading in the Atlantic Ocean, showing an image corresponding to the dimensions of the 270-foot ship. Ryan testified in U.S.
NEWS
April 3, 1990 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the SS Central America broke apart in a hurricane and its passengers fought desperately to live, the fortunes harvested from California's gold fields no longer mattered. "The love of gold was forgotten in the anxiety and terror of the moment and many a man unbuckled his gold-stuffed belt and flung his hard-earned treasure upon the deck, some hoping to lighten their weight . . .
NEWS
July 19, 1987 | From the Washington Post
A partnership of low-profile treasure hunters has laid claim to what they believe is one of America's most historic shipwrecks, a paddle-wheel steamer sunk in 1857 with about $450 million in gold coins from the California Gold Rush. The broken wreck of the Central America, a U.S. Mail steamship that went down in a hurricane with a loss of 428 lives, lies in 8,000 feet of water just within the 200-mile continental limit off the South Carolina coast, the Columbus America Discovery Group says.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 2001 | CHELSEA J. CARTER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Eureka, the gigantic gold bar that sat on the ocean floor for more than a century, only to be consigned to a safe for years afterward while insurance companies fought over it, has been sold for a record $8 million. The ingot, as big as a loaf of bread, is the largest known gold bar to come out of California's Gold Rush.
NEWS
March 23, 1993 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court dealt a defeat Monday to explorers for sunken treasure by rejecting the "finders, keepers" principle in a case involving the most famous shipwreck from the days of the California Gold Rush. In September, 1857, the SS Central America, a luxurious sidewheel steamer, was loaded with several tons of gold bars and coins from California destined for New York City when it sank off the South Carolina coast in a heavy gale.
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