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NEWS
September 19, 2012 | T.J. Simers
Right now it's just an experienced hunch, the NFL's version of two plus two equals the return of the Chargers to Los Angeles next March in partnership with the new owner of AEG. And with the mention now of Patrick Soon-Shiong, the richest man in Los Angeles, as a potential AEG owner, which would give the NFL a local presence, it really does add up. Knowing NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell as I do and how he has brokered deals in the past, I...
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SPORTS
April 1, 2014
Bill Plaschke, a staple of The Times Sports section since joining the paper in 1987, has taken first place in the Associated Press Sports Editors annual contest for column writing among papers with circulations of more than 175,000. Plaschke, a columnist since 1996, has now won the prestigious national columnist award five times and has been a frequent top-10 finisher in multiple writing categories. The contest honors the best work in sports journalism both in print and on the web. The final column-writing results were announced Tuesday.
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NEWS
August 19, 2012 | Liz Weston, Money Talk
Dear Liz: I co-signed some private student loans for my youngest child. She graduated two years ago with about $80,000 in student debt, including federal and private loans. Like many other recent graduates, she has had a difficult time finding a job. She worked part time at a retail store until about a month ago and made around $7,000 annually. I have been helping her make reduced payments and she has gotten deferments and income-based repayment plans. But I'm planning to retire in a few months and won't be able to make the payments as I have been.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2014 | By David Colker
Former Los Angeles Times reporter Ruth Ryon, who created the highly popular and enduring Hot Property column on celebrity real estate, died Friday at a hospice facility in Redondo Beach. She was 69. The cause was complications of Parkinson's disease, said her husband, George Ryon. For Angelenos, some of whom visit homes for sale even if they're not looking to buy, Ryon's column quickly became a guilty-pleasure must-read. The first column, which appeared Nov. 25, 1984, led with Johnny Carson buying a house in Malibu for $9.5 million, at the time the most ever paid in that area for a single-family home.
NEWS
February 14, 2013 | By Lisa Boone
You can learn a lot about history by studying the objects in our home, said Amy Azzarito, author of the new book “Past & Present: 24 Favorite Moments in Decorative Arts History and 24 Modern DIY Projects Inspired by Them” ($27.50; Abrams ). Designer Kate Pruitt's do-it-yourself modern Gustavian clock, for example, is based on the 18th century designs of Swedish farmers who built them for extra income. More than a century later, the restrained style influenced a revival of Gustavian furniture by Ikea.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 2013 | By Lauren Williams
Three people were injured, one seriously, when a decorative column fell over Friday at the Orange County Fairgrounds, authorities said. Costa Mesa firefighters received a call at 12:07 p.m. that the 4-foot-wide, 15-foot-tall structure fell near Gate 4 near where the Anatolian Cultures and Food Festival was taking place, according to fire Capt. Tim Vasin. Vasin said he believed the structure was part of the festival. Bystanders lifted the column, freeing a person who was trapped under it, before firefighters arrived.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 1999 | TOM PLATE
Tom Plate's column, which normally runs on Tuesdays, will appear on Wednesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2003
I enjoy David Shaw's column, "Media Matters." His column about Arnold and Kobe ("Arnold, Kobe: Separating the Men from the Image," Sept. 21) was particularly thought-provoking. It's nice when a person's good works are reported. We need more positive stories and analysis in the news. Cynthia Peters West Covina As a 76-year-old mother of five and grandmother of 12, I want David Shaw to know that the good sense he displayed in "Arnold, Kobe: Separating the Men from the Image" shows me that he is a man/son any mother would be proud of. Keep up the good work, David!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1991
Re: Tony Perry column, "Was Juvenile Agent Exposed to Too Much XXX to Testify?" (Aug. 14). The overworked San Diego Police Deparment is making an effort to keep juveniles out of the burgeoning adult book stores as much as possible. The majority of the public appreciates this effort. Unfortunately, Mr. Perry feels it's necessary to write a sneering, comedic column deriding their good work. He even quotes criminal attorney A. Dale Manicom's college-boy humor--real class. Women and children (even toddlers)
REAL ESTATE
October 14, 1990
Am I the only reader tired of the "Hot Property" column in your Real Estate section? Is no part of your paper free from this type of "journalism?" With 90% of Angelenos unable to buy houses, I find the front-page devotion to stars and their mansions to be in very poor taste. The Times only adds to the disgusting hyper-glamorization of celebrities' lives, which already is culturally far too prevalent. Must we gawk while our middle class gets squeezed into extinction? JIMMY TERRY Los Angeles
SPORTS
March 27, 2014 | Bill Plaschke
MEMPHIS, Tenn. - There were 10 minutes remaining in what would have been the maddest March moment of all. UCLA trailed top-seeded Florida by just one point. The streaking, upstart Bruins had the veteran Gators reeling, gasping, wondering. Steve Alford's kids were on the verge of stunning their way through South Regional semifinals and on to previously unimaginable greatness. "We really felt like were on the verge of taking the lead," said Norman Powell. "The energy was shifting.
SPORTS
March 27, 2014 | Helene Elliott
PITTSBURGH -- As much as the Kings' 3-2 victory over the Penguins was about numbers -- highlighted by their seven-for-seven penalty-killing effort as they tied a franchise record with their eighth straight road win -- their success was equally about their attitude and being at their best when the situation seemed to be at its worst. In earning one-goal wins in Philadelphia, Washington and Pittsburgh in a four-day span and in holding NHL scoring leader Sidney Crosby to one assist Thursday while blanking the league's most potent power play, the Kings turned apparent adversity into an advantage to win their fifth straight game and 13th in their last 16. They finished play against the East at 21-8-3, tying San Jose and St. Louis for the most wins by a West team against the East.
SPORTS
March 26, 2014 | Chris Dufresne
Only the very best teams in college basketball have advanced to the NCAA tournament's round of 16. Take Dayton versus Stanford in the South Regional … please. Dayton finished fifth in the Atlantic 10 Conference and absorbed a 26-point loss this season at St. Joseph's. Stanford tuned up for the NCAA tournament with an invigorating 25-point loss to UCLA. UCLA is not one to talk, though, losing its last Pac-12 Conference regular-season game, by 18, at doormat Washington State.
OPINION
March 23, 2014
Re "Pulling a story out of thin air," Opinion, March 20 Meghan Daum's column on media coverage of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 raised one point, and somewhat surprisingly so: At the beginning of her column, she noted Rush Limbaugh's complaint about newscasters who "don't know beans about even why an airplane flies" but offer speculation on the vaguest of premises. I agree. It's sort of like radio show hosts with little or no formal education offering in-depth, "intellectual" political analyses on Supreme Court opinions, election demographics, foreign policy and more.
SPORTS
March 21, 2014 | Bill Plaschke
SAN DIEGO - No Duke here. No Ohio State anywhere. And no, giggle, not even a hint of New Mexico. At the late-night end of two NCAA tournament opening days filled with higher seeds laying giant eggs, UCLA finished Friday's madness with a simple, dominating march. The Bruins stomped through fears a talented fourth seed would overlook a pesky 13th-seed, trampled worries their new coach couldn't win a tournament opener, and even flattened a 20-year-old nightmare with a 76-59 victory over Tulsa.
SPORTS
March 19, 2014 | Chris Dufresne
It takes years to climb the mid-major success ladder and minutes for it to be pulled out from under you. Last year, Gonzaga finally got to the top rung when it entered the NCAA tournament as the top-ranked team in the nation. The Bulldogs rolled into the Salt Lake City sub-regional with legitimate national title aspirations, even though skeptics thought Gonzaga was overrated and didn't play in a tough enough conference to warrant all the fuss. The critics were only emboldened after Gonzaga was sent home on the first weekend by a scrappy, hungry, No. 9-seeded team with something to prove.
NEWS
February 24, 1991
I want you to know what a positive impact Linda Feldman's Seniors column (Feb. 10) is for our Second Careers Program. First, from our perspective the article was exceptionally well done. It was well written and accurately portrayed what we do. The response to the article has been extremely strong. After it ran in Sunday's paper, we had over 35 calls on Monday and 25 more on Tuesday. Thank you very much for highlighting one of our participants and our services. TOD LIPKA, director Second Careers Program
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2014 | By David Colker
Former Los Angeles Times reporter Ruth Ryon, who created the highly popular and enduring Hot Property column on celebrity real estate, died Friday at a hospice facility in Redondo Beach. She was 69. The cause was complications of Parkinson's disease, said her husband, George Ryon. For Angelenos, some of whom visit homes for sale even if they're not looking to buy, Ryon's column quickly became a guilty-pleasure must-read. The first column, which appeared Nov. 25, 1984, led with Johnny Carson buying a house in Malibu for $9.5 million, at the time the most ever paid in that area for a single-family home.
SPORTS
March 5, 2014 | By Kevin Baxter
If World Cup tuneups are designed to build confidence and improve team chemistry, then Ukraine's emotional 2-0 win over the U.S. on Wednesday in Larnaca, Cyprus, was a disaster for the Americans. But if the idea is to identify weaknesses and expose mistakes, then the match was a huge success. Because the U.S. did little right in a sloppy, confused effort that is all the more worrisome since it came less than 100 days from the start of this summer's tournament in Brazil. "It was difficult for a lot of players to get into a rhythm, to stand out," said U.S. Coach Juergen Klinsmann, who used the match as a final evaluation for the European-based players on the fringes of his World Cup roster.
OPINION
March 2, 2014 | Doyle McManus
Nearly a generation ago, MSNBC's Chris Matthews coined a description of our two political parties that may turn out to be his most enduring contribution to American punditry. Republicans, Matthews wrote, were the "Daddy Party," all about military security and self-reliance; Democrats were the "Mommy Party," all about health, education and nurturing. At the time, in 1991, Democrats weren't sure they considered that much of a compliment. Since then, a long line of Democratic presidential candidates - including one who is an actual mommy, Hillary Rodham Clinton - have taken pains to prove they could be as tough and decisive as any stereotypical Mad Man. But this year, facing an uphill battle to retain their majority in the Senate, the Democrats have decided to embrace the label as a badge of honor, making a strong appeal to women - especially working mothers - with whom Republicans have struggled to connect.
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