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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 2013 | By Lauren Williams
Three people were injured, one seriously, when a decorative column fell over Friday at the Orange County Fairgrounds, authorities said. Costa Mesa firefighters received a call at 12:07 p.m. that the 4-foot-wide, 15-foot-tall structure fell near Gate 4 near where the Anatolian Cultures and Food Festival was taking place, according to fire Capt. Tim Vasin. Vasin said he believed the structure was part of the festival. Bystanders lifted the column, freeing a person who was trapped under it, before firefighters arrived.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By Chris Megerian
SACRAMENTO -- The launch of a new political website in California, intended to highlight conservative success stories in the Golden State, quickly ran into trouble on Monday when controversial promotional images cost the organization one of its highest-profile contributors. The images, including a Photoshopped depiction of House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-San Francisco) on all fours in a bikini with her tongue hanging out, prompted House Majority Whip Kevin McCarthy (R-Bakersfield)
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NEWS
February 14, 2013 | By Lisa Boone
You can learn a lot about history by studying the objects in our home, said Amy Azzarito, author of the new book “Past & Present: 24 Favorite Moments in Decorative Arts History and 24 Modern DIY Projects Inspired by Them” ($27.50; Abrams ). Designer Kate Pruitt's do-it-yourself modern Gustavian clock, for example, is based on the 18th century designs of Swedish farmers who built them for extra income. More than a century later, the restrained style influenced a revival of Gustavian furniture by Ikea.
SPORTS
April 1, 2014
Bill Plaschke, a staple of The Times Sports section since joining the paper in 1987, has taken first place in the Associated Press Sports Editors annual contest for column writing among papers with circulations of more than 175,000. Plaschke, a columnist since 1996, has now won the prestigious national columnist award five times and has been a frequent top-10 finisher in multiple writing categories. The contest honors the best work in sports journalism both in print and on the web. The final column-writing results were announced Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 1999 | TOM PLATE
Tom Plate's column, which normally runs on Tuesdays, will appear on Wednesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2003
I enjoy David Shaw's column, "Media Matters." His column about Arnold and Kobe ("Arnold, Kobe: Separating the Men from the Image," Sept. 21) was particularly thought-provoking. It's nice when a person's good works are reported. We need more positive stories and analysis in the news. Cynthia Peters West Covina As a 76-year-old mother of five and grandmother of 12, I want David Shaw to know that the good sense he displayed in "Arnold, Kobe: Separating the Men from the Image" shows me that he is a man/son any mother would be proud of. Keep up the good work, David!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1991
Re: Tony Perry column, "Was Juvenile Agent Exposed to Too Much XXX to Testify?" (Aug. 14). The overworked San Diego Police Deparment is making an effort to keep juveniles out of the burgeoning adult book stores as much as possible. The majority of the public appreciates this effort. Unfortunately, Mr. Perry feels it's necessary to write a sneering, comedic column deriding their good work. He even quotes criminal attorney A. Dale Manicom's college-boy humor--real class. Women and children (even toddlers)
NATIONAL
November 9, 2013 | By Soumya Karlamangla
It was a magazine column designed to generate a discussion of gun rights. “Way too many gun owners still seem to believe that any regulation of the right to keep and bear arms is an infringement," the column said. "The fact is, all constitutional rights are regulated, always have been, all need to be.” Titled "Let's Talk Limits," the column was published in the December issue of Guns & Ammo , the well-known magazine based in Florida, and written by longtime contributing editor Dick Metcalf.
NEWS
December 19, 2002
A classic column ("Yes, Virginia, You Must Believe," Dec. 12). And you're single why? Or maybe you're not and that's just your marital status de plume. Bob Colleary Sherman Oaks
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2012 | Sandy Banks
I knew I'd be navigating a minefield in my Saturday column, which dealt with two combustible topics: race and politics. I said that the Republican campaign, in the run-up to Tuesday's presidential vote, has resorted to a not-so-subtle nativist appeal that relies on racial animus and fears. All that "It's time to take our country back" rhetoric you hear at GOP rallies makes me wonder just whose country they think this is. I know race-baiting when I hear it. INTERACTIVE: Battleground states map The response to the column on public comment boards tended toward the ugly - as anonymous forums often do. But the hundreds of emails I received revealed a divided but thoughtful populace, harboring fears and resentments as real as my own. My column accused the campaign's rhetoric of creating a haven for prejudice, promoting Barack Obama's other-ness as a socially acceptable proxy for racial prejudice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2014 | By David Colker
Former Los Angeles Times reporter Ruth Ryon, who created the highly popular and enduring Hot Property column on celebrity real estate, died Friday at a hospice facility in Redondo Beach. She was 69. The cause was complications of Parkinson's disease, said her husband, George Ryon. For Angelenos, some of whom visit homes for sale even if they're not looking to buy, Ryon's column quickly became a guilty-pleasure must-read. The first column, which appeared Nov. 25, 1984, led with Johnny Carson buying a house in Malibu for $9.5 million, at the time the most ever paid in that area for a single-family home.
OPINION
March 23, 2014
Re "Pulling a story out of thin air," Opinion, March 20 Meghan Daum's column on media coverage of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 raised one point, and somewhat surprisingly so: At the beginning of her column, she noted Rush Limbaugh's complaint about newscasters who "don't know beans about even why an airplane flies" but offer speculation on the vaguest of premises. I agree. It's sort of like radio show hosts with little or no formal education offering in-depth, "intellectual" political analyses on Supreme Court opinions, election demographics, foreign policy and more.
OPINION
February 13, 2014
Re "Ban's not quite in the bag," Column, Feb. 11 Plastic bags aren't banned where I live in Florida, but it's just as easy, and more responsible, for me to sit my stash of tote bags on my porch and grab them when I go grocery shopping. In the book "One Can Make a Difference," filmmaker Rebecca Hosking - who made the documentary "Hawaii: Message in the Waves" - explains that more than 100,000 birds and marine animals die every year after they mistake floating plastic bags for food and eat them.
OPINION
February 8, 2014
Re "Media upheaval is bad news," Column, Feb. 2 Michael Hiltzik rightly spotlights the fact that hard news is sharply declining in many newer forms of media. Commentary, often poorly worded, is disguised as news, even at outlets that have admitted they are subordinating high standards of journalism to pursuit of high advertising revenues available when the audience is large. Worse, many are politically partisan and tend to attract people who are unsophisticated and use these commentators as their only source of "news.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2014 | Sandy Banks
Most reporters I know have a story they've covered that's stuck with them, long after the journalism was done. Mine is about Eddie Dotson, a man who lived for years on the streets, under a freeway near USC - until I met him in 2009 and helped his family retrieve him. I wrote a column then about Eddie and the elegant sidewalk dwelling he'd built from other people's castoffs: He didn't have water or electricity, but he had matching candlesticks...
OPINION
January 19, 2014
Re “She's a mother hen to Ducks,” Column One, Jan. 14 Having to suddenly deal with grievous injuries such as shattered mouths and deep facial lacerations understandably causes Dr. Bao-Thy Grant some anxiety, but after reading Times staff writer David Wharton's article, it's crystal clear that Grant is just as tough as the National Hockey League players she treats. I very much enjoyed your behind-the-scenes feature about this oral surgeon for the Ducks hockey team. Steve Carey Burbank More letters to the editor ...  
TRAVEL
September 19, 2004
I regularly read Susan Spano's column, Her World. Her article "60 Curious, Brave Women Travelers" [Sept. 5] was particularly inspired and perhaps her best work. The Times hasn't published anything this good since columnist Jack Smith died. She made me want to go back to the National Portrait Gallery in London. Michele Stone Tujunga
REAL ESTATE
May 27, 2007
I have really missed Robert Bruss' Real Estate Q&A. It has always provided a breadth of useful and interesting information on a topic of interest to many. I hope his column is just on vacation and that it will soon return. Please advise as to its future status. MONICA RUZICH HAMILTON Huntington Beach Editor's note: Bruss has been ill. His column will resume as soon as he returns to work.
SPORTS
January 10, 2014 | Sam Farmer
SEATTLE - Percy Harvin went from eye-popping acquisition to forehead-slapping disappointment. The star receiver and returner from Minnesota played just one game for the Seattle Seahawks this season, having undergone hip surgery in August. His fall has been utterly forgettable. But one big game Saturday could change all that. Harvin is an undeniable X-factor in Saturday's divisional playoff game against New Orleans, an explosive playmaker who could give a sleepwalking Seahawks offense the jolt it has been seeking.
SPORTS
December 30, 2013 | Helene Elliott
The men who will wear the red, white and blue of Team USA at the Sochi Olympics have been sporting a lot of black and blue this season. Injuries have clouded the medal prospects for the Americans, who will bring back the core of a team that won the silver medal at Vancouver in 2010. Those injuries have also made it difficult to predict whose names will be called when the 25-player roster is announced Wednesday, after the nationally televised Winter Classic game. Kings goaltender Jonathan Quick hasn't played since he sustained a groin injury Nov. 12, though he's expected back the first week of January.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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