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SPORTS
April 24, 1993
I have never been a big fan of Jim Murray, but his April 15 column hit the nail on the head. The ridiculously exorbitant salaries paid to these "entertainers" is both demeaning and demoralizing to the rest of us "little people." Are we supposed to cheer for them so they can improve their market value? These athletes do nothing constructive for our society except to provide unattainable career models for our youth. As a (Los Angeles Unified School District) teacher, I can only try to hold my rage in check as I receive a pay cut to $21,000 while the guy at the end of the bench is getting $1.2 million a year.
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SPORTS
April 24, 1993
I have never been a big fan of Jim Murray, but his April 15 column hit the nail on the head. The ridiculously exorbitant salaries paid to these "entertainers" is both demeaning and demoralizing to the rest of us "little people." Are we supposed to cheer for them so they can improve their market value? These athletes do nothing constructive for our society except to provide unattainable career models for our youth. As a (Los Angeles Unified School District) teacher, I can only try to hold my rage in check as I receive a pay cut to $21,000 while the guy at the end of the bench is getting $1.2 million a year.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1991 | CHARLES WOLF JR.., Charles Wolf Jr. is dean of the RAND Graduate School and director of RAND's research in international economics
Before Desert Storm and Desert Shield, it had become fashionable in some circles to predict the receding importance of military power, and its replacement by economic power, in the hierarchy of global policy instruments. Saddam Hussein's invasion of Kuwait and the successful prosecution of the U.S-led war effort silenced the rhetoric about the obsolescence of military power.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1991 | CHARLES WOLF JR.., Charles Wolf Jr. is dean of the RAND Graduate School and director of RAND's research in international economics
Before Desert Storm and Desert Shield, it had become fashionable in some circles to predict the receding importance of military power, and its replacement by economic power, in the hierarchy of global policy instruments. Saddam Hussein's invasion of Kuwait and the successful prosecution of the U.S-led war effort silenced the rhetoric about the obsolescence of military power.
NEWS
March 4, 1991 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is 5:45 a.m. on Inglewood Avenue in Hawthorne and Christine is preparing for a grueling 12-hour day during which she will sort through trash, seeking to supplement a meager welfare check. As the headlights of her battered Ford Escort pick up the shapes along the curbside, her practiced eye catches sight of an odd-sized bulge in a trash bag and she jams on the brakes. Dashing to the curb, she peers into the bag and reaches deep inside.
OPINION
June 3, 2008
Re "Sacred pots tie up taxes," column, May 29 I would like to offer a few points of clarification that went unsaid in George Skelton's column. Taking money away from First 5 would leave many of the families who are most vulnerable to the state's budget cuts without crucial resources. Last year alone, First 5 provided 2.7 million Californians with services that will benefit young children throughout their lifetimes, including health insurance, high-quality preschool, early health screenings and oral healthcare.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1994 | JENNIFER OLDHAM
A girls soccer coach broke into the homes of teen-age players to steal their underwear, police said Tuesday. Luis Castellanos, 19, was ordered to appear June 8 in Pasadena Superior Court for arraignment on seven felony counts of residential burglary and 12 counts of receiving stolen property after a Tuesday hearing in Glendale Municipal Court. Castellanos, who has pleaded not guilty, is being held at the Los Angeles County Jail in lieu of $100,000 bail.
BUSINESS
September 27, 1987
The Times on Monday launches a major expansion of the Business section. With two additional pages of space for news and features every day, the expansion will permit more complete coverage, particularly of business in Southern California, and allow greater use of graphics.
BUSINESS
May 10, 1996 | From Associated Press
Dan Dorfman, the controversial business journalist whose reports appear on the CNBC cable network, has suffered a mild stroke, the business network said Thursday. CNBC said Dorfman was taken ill Tuesday afternoon and has been hospitalized but that his prognosis is excellent and he is expected to recover fully. In a statement, the network quoted the 64-year-old commentator as saying he is "alert, mobile and feeling very well." "He sounded fine.
BUSINESS
February 3, 2008 | Kathy M. Kristof, Times Staff Writer
When it comes to dealing with freeloading friends and deadbeat relatives, Jeanne Fleming and Leonard Schwarz suggest that you be what they call the three P's: prompt, polite and pointed. All too often, people get taken advantage of for no better reason than that cheapskates think they get away with it, according to the husband-and-wife writers, who pen a money and ethics column for Money magazine. "There's no indication that these are people who are down to their last dollar," Schwarz said.
NEWS
March 4, 1991 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is 5:45 a.m. on Inglewood Avenue in Hawthorne and Christine is preparing for a grueling 12-hour day during which she will sort through trash, seeking to supplement a meager welfare check. As the headlights of her battered Ford Escort pick up the shapes along the curbside, her practiced eye catches sight of an odd-sized bulge in a trash bag and she jams on the brakes. Dashing to the curb, she peers into the bag and reaches deep inside.
BUSINESS
January 2, 1989
JANUARY A presidential commission headed by Nicholas F. Brady issues a call for stock market reform. Its report on the stock market crash of October, 1987, recommends "circuit breakers" to limit price movements, new rules for buying securities on credit and other measures. Swiss pharmaceutical giant Hoffmann-La Roche bids $4.2 billion for Sterling Drug, the maker of Bayer aspirin, but weeks later Eastman Kodak wins Sterling for more than $5 billion.
OPINION
February 23, 2002
Re "Why Reward Iran's Zealots?" Opinion, Feb. 17: Nikki R. Keddie shares the view of most people outside the U.S. when she describes as bizarre President Bush's inclusion of Iran in his "axis of evil" speech. Not long ago the U.S. was praising Iran for offering its cooperation in Afghanistan. When it became apparent that the Taliban and Al Qaeda were on the run, Washington not only reverted to form but upped the stakes by using fundamentalist language that would put a hard-line cleric to shame.
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