Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsColumn One
IN THE NEWS

Column One

FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
November 10, 2013
Re "France is having a midweek crisis," Column One, Nov. 6 The controversy over French children having to attend class on Wednesdays brought to mind a quote by a friend - a teacher - who once said, "The mind can only absorb what punishment that the fanny can take. " Too many hours during a single sitting do not necessarily translate to productivity. Rich Flynn Huntington Beach ALSO: Letters: Justice poorly served Letters: Legalizing street vendors Letters: Prayer and the Supreme Court
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
January 25, 2014
Re "Rookie teen turns pro," Column One, Jan. 21 How refreshing: an article about a talented, well-grounded and genuine young woman instead of one about some twaddle-brained twerker. Kind of restores one's faith in the future. Kate MacMahon Orange ALSO: Mailbag: Living on the street Letters: The poor's new ally -- the GOP Letters: Combating ignorance on climate change
Advertisement
OPINION
September 30, 2012
Re "A way of life withers," Column One, Sept. 26 How disappointing on two counts. First, the subject of your Column One blatantly violates Los Angeles' gas-powered leaf blower ordinance; second, The Times is apparently so entirely ignorant of the 13-year-old ban as to illustrate the front-page story with a photo perpetuating the use of the infernal and illegal machines. William Campbell Los Angeles ALSO: Letters: Pension perspective Letters: Some clarity on pot policy Letters: Freeway noise -- get used to it
OPINION
November 10, 2013
Re "France is having a midweek crisis," Column One, Nov. 6 The controversy over French children having to attend class on Wednesdays brought to mind a quote by a friend - a teacher - who once said, "The mind can only absorb what punishment that the fanny can take. " Too many hours during a single sitting do not necessarily translate to productivity. Rich Flynn Huntington Beach ALSO: Letters: Justice poorly served Letters: Legalizing street vendors Letters: Prayer and the Supreme Court
OPINION
January 25, 2014
Re "Rookie teen turns pro," Column One, Jan. 21 How refreshing: an article about a talented, well-grounded and genuine young woman instead of one about some twaddle-brained twerker. Kind of restores one's faith in the future. Kate MacMahon Orange ALSO: Mailbag: Living on the street Letters: The poor's new ally -- the GOP Letters: Combating ignorance on climate change
OPINION
April 9, 2013
Re "Packing and preaching," Column One, April 5 So pistol-packing preacher James McAbee - whose law enforcement mother shot herself (twice), eventually leading to her death - proudly carries weapons without safeties, with a round chambered, in public and around his minor children. And he teaches gun safety? And of course he's right when he says it's wrong to blame the tool for a shooting. Indeed, guns don't kill people; carelessness does. Terry Snyder Los Angeles ALSO: Letters: Nukes and Iran's leaders Letters: Rat poison and human health Letters: Parents who care, gay or straight
OPINION
August 1, 2013
Re "Pastime always is his present," Column One, July 29 What a great article on Dodgers scout George Genovese. I met him about 10 years ago when he spotted my then-17-year-old nephew at a park throwing and hitting. Genovese gave him some fielding tips and a lot of baseball knowledge in about half an hour. My nephew and I will always be grateful for his willingness to share what he knew. I'm glad he's still going strong at 91. Al Sheahen Sherman Oaks ALSO: Letters: San Diego's clueless mayor Letters: Environmental injustice in L.A. Letters: The evolution of racial prejudice
SPORTS
August 13, 2010 | Bill Dwyre
The top of the morning sports pages said it was Aug. 13. Everything else in the section said the calendar had run out on the Dodgers' season. Yes, there is time, just not enough. The season ends in October, not at Christmas. Do you believe in miracles? Sure, but not from a team with an overworked closer, a withdrawing superstar outfielder and a legendary manager who is both underappreciated and left to fix things with a mostly empty toolbox. Joe Torre is the glue, but his owners have banned sticky things.
NATIONAL
June 11, 2011 | By Robin Abcarian, Los Angeles Times
The memo leaked in the spring of 2007. A deputy campaign manager for Hillary Rodham Clinton urged her to skip the Iowa caucuses in her quest for the Democratic presidential nomination. Participating in the first contest of the 2008 presidential calendar, he wrote, was expensive, outdated and unnecessary. Iowans, who take their role as first presidential vetters seriously, were not amused. Clinton scrambled into damage-control mode. But she'd violated an unwritten Iowa rule: Never, ever, give voice to the idea that Iowa is not the center of the political universe.
WORLD
May 15, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
AGA, Egypt - After an unfriendly journalist was tossed off, Amr Moussa's campaign bus headed north to the Nile Delta, where barefoot boys and peasants greeted him with horns, drums and two dancing horses. Moussa arrived as both novelty and sensation, a front-runner in Egypt's first freely contested presidential election. The former diplomat who once negotiated with world leaders walked roads strewn with hay and spotted with manure, giving speeches on dignity and chatting with elders near herds of sheep and sheds full of broken farm equipment.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2013 | By Reed Johnson
Becky G vividly remembers what she calls "my little mini midlife crisis. " It happened seven years ago, when she was 9. At the time, her family had been forced to move into her grandparents' Inglewood garage after losing its Riverside County home. Money was tight. Her dad was stressing out. And her mom was "really scared. " That's when Becky had an epiphany. "I did have this moment of realization of, 'Oh, my God, what am I going to do with my life?'" she says. "Just feeling like I had to get my act together, even though there was really nothing to put together yet. " Today, the biggest challenge facing the preternaturally ambitious Mexican American teen isn't getting her act together.
OPINION
August 1, 2013
Re "Pastime always is his present," Column One, July 29 What a great article on Dodgers scout George Genovese. I met him about 10 years ago when he spotted my then-17-year-old nephew at a park throwing and hitting. Genovese gave him some fielding tips and a lot of baseball knowledge in about half an hour. My nephew and I will always be grateful for his willingness to share what he knew. I'm glad he's still going strong at 91. Al Sheahen Sherman Oaks ALSO: Letters: San Diego's clueless mayor Letters: Environmental injustice in L.A. Letters: The evolution of racial prejudice
OPINION
April 9, 2013
Re "Packing and preaching," Column One, April 5 So pistol-packing preacher James McAbee - whose law enforcement mother shot herself (twice), eventually leading to her death - proudly carries weapons without safeties, with a round chambered, in public and around his minor children. And he teaches gun safety? And of course he's right when he says it's wrong to blame the tool for a shooting. Indeed, guns don't kill people; carelessness does. Terry Snyder Los Angeles ALSO: Letters: Nukes and Iran's leaders Letters: Rat poison and human health Letters: Parents who care, gay or straight
OPINION
September 30, 2012
Re "A way of life withers," Column One, Sept. 26 How disappointing on two counts. First, the subject of your Column One blatantly violates Los Angeles' gas-powered leaf blower ordinance; second, The Times is apparently so entirely ignorant of the 13-year-old ban as to illustrate the front-page story with a photo perpetuating the use of the infernal and illegal machines. William Campbell Los Angeles ALSO: Letters: Pension perspective Letters: Some clarity on pot policy Letters: Freeway noise -- get used to it
WORLD
May 15, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
AGA, Egypt - After an unfriendly journalist was tossed off, Amr Moussa's campaign bus headed north to the Nile Delta, where barefoot boys and peasants greeted him with horns, drums and two dancing horses. Moussa arrived as both novelty and sensation, a front-runner in Egypt's first freely contested presidential election. The former diplomat who once negotiated with world leaders walked roads strewn with hay and spotted with manure, giving speeches on dignity and chatting with elders near herds of sheep and sheds full of broken farm equipment.
NATIONAL
June 11, 2011 | By Robin Abcarian, Los Angeles Times
The memo leaked in the spring of 2007. A deputy campaign manager for Hillary Rodham Clinton urged her to skip the Iowa caucuses in her quest for the Democratic presidential nomination. Participating in the first contest of the 2008 presidential calendar, he wrote, was expensive, outdated and unnecessary. Iowans, who take their role as first presidential vetters seriously, were not amused. Clinton scrambled into damage-control mode. But she'd violated an unwritten Iowa rule: Never, ever, give voice to the idea that Iowa is not the center of the political universe.
NEWS
October 15, 1995 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three have been fired and 10 have quit. Nine have been promoted. Two have killed suspects while on duty. And one stands accused of falsifying evidence in a murder case. For most of the 44 Los Angeles Police Department officers labeled "problem officers" in the landmark 1991 Christopher Commission report, the past four years have been tumultuous. The commission said its intention was to illustrate, not define, what it called "the problem of excessive force in the LAPD."
NEWS
August 7, 1991 | SCOTT HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A decade ago, many people considered Jack Bailey the best of men. He was praised as a humanitarian who had aided thousands of Southeast Asian refugees, hailed as a hero who had given desperate people a chance to live. One missionary called him "the most genuinely compassionate man I ever met." Then that Jack Bailey seemed to all but vanish, sinking into the murky realm where Americans haunted by Vietnam try to raise the dead--the presumed dead, that is.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2011 | By Harriet Ryan and Yvonne Villarreal, Los Angeles Times
Walking through the doors of a crowded San Francisco bar, Kristin Curtin was all business. Her eyes moved from face to face before coming to rest on a pretty young woman chatting up a male patron. "You could just tell the way she was interacting with him that he was mesmerized. There were hundreds of people in that pub, but she just captured my attention," recalled Curtin, a freelance casting producer. She gave the woman her business card and a pitch about why she might want to try out for a new NBC reality show that combines love and adventure.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2010 | By Harriet Ryan, Los Angeles Times
A middle-aged man in a neon orange polo shirt and baggy blue gym shorts sat at a conference table in West Hollywood one recent afternoon interviewing a prospective ghostwriter. "It's called 'Redemption,'" said Aaron Tonken, the man with the story to tell. "It's going to be big. " When Tonken was marched off to federal prison six years ago in a charity fraud scandal that embarrassed a slew of A-list celebrities, it was difficult to imagine him returning to Hollywood, let alone persuading a major literary agency to shop a book and movie deal about his life.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|