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Combat Stress

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NEWS
May 3, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
Civilians who don the uniform and march into war carrying the psychological burden of previous trauma -- or of afflictions such as depression or anxiety disorder --  are far more likely than their mentally healthy comrades to suffer battle-related stress following deployment, new research has found. A study published this week in the Archives of General Psychiatry also found that women, African Americans and those with less education were slightly more likely to suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder ( PTSD )
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NATIONAL
August 2, 2012 | By Kim Murphy
JOINT BASE LEWIS-McCHORD, Wash. - Officials at the largest Army medical center in the West said Thursday that they have eliminated second-tier psychiatric reviews for soldiers diagnosed with combat stress. The change, they said, is part of a new effort to eliminate disparities in diagnoses and remove the stigma for service members looking for psychological help. “Our No. 1 concern is taking care of these soldiers…. We're moving forward, doing the right thing,” said Lt. Gen. Robert B. Brown, commanding general of the Army's I Corps, at a news conference detailing the policies unveiled earlier this week.
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NATIONAL
August 2, 2012 | By Kim Murphy
JOINT BASE LEWIS-McCHORD, Wash. - Officials at the largest Army medical center in the West said Thursday that they have eliminated second-tier psychiatric reviews for soldiers diagnosed with combat stress. The change, they said, is part of a new effort to eliminate disparities in diagnoses and remove the stigma for service members looking for psychological help. “Our No. 1 concern is taking care of these soldiers…. We're moving forward, doing the right thing,” said Lt. Gen. Robert B. Brown, commanding general of the Army's I Corps, at a news conference detailing the policies unveiled earlier this week.
NATIONAL
April 25, 2012 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
SEATTLE — In a move to improve treatments for post-traumatic stress disorder, the Army is discouraging the use of traditional definitions such as feelings of fear, helplessness and horror — symptoms that may not be in a trained warrior's vocabulary. It also is recommending against the use of anti-anxiety and antipsychotic medications for such combat stress in favor of more proven drugs. The changes are reflected in a new policy document released this month, one that reflects a growing understanding of the "occupational" nature of the condition for many troops.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 2007 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
CAMP PENDLETON -- The names -- while comic -- were meant to reflect an unfunny reality: the sometimes overbearing stress felt by Marines and sailors serving in Iraq. Such as Cpl. Angermode, who after a roadside bomb exploded in Ramadi began telling his fellow Marines that he couldn't wait to begin killing Iraqis. Chief Screamer, who dealt with his stress by screaming at everyone. And Lance Cpl. Stoneface, who just shut down emotionally and kept silently to himself.
NATIONAL
April 7, 2012 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
SEATTLE - U.S. Air Force pilot Patrick Burke's day started in the cockpit of a B-1 bomber near the Persian Gulf and proceeded across nine time zones as he ferried the aircraft home to South Dakota. Every four hours during the 19-hour flight, Burke swallowed a tablet of Dexedrine, the prescribed amphetamine known as "go pills. " After landing, he went out for dinner and drinks with a fellow crewman. They were driving back to Ellsworth Air Force Base when Burke began striking his friend in the head.
NATIONAL
March 18, 2012 | By David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
Drone crews protect U.S. ground troops by watching over them 24 hours a day from high above. Sitting before video screens thousands of miles from their remote-controlled aircraft, the crews scan for enemy ambushes and possible roadside bombs, while also monitoring what the military calls "patterns of life. " Only rarely do drone crews fire on the enemy. The rest of the time, they sit and watch. For hours on end. Day after day. It can get monotonous and, yes, boring. It can also be gut-wrenching.
NATIONAL
February 21, 2012 | By Kim Murphy
The head of the Army 's Madigan Healthcare System, one of the largest military hospitals on the West Coast, has been temporarily relieved of command amid an investigation over whether the Army has avoided diagnosing returning combat soldiers with post-traumatic stress disorder to save money. Col. Dallas Homas, a West Point graduate has been administratively removed from his position near Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Washington state, Army officials announced Monday. Homas had headed the busy medical center since March 2011.  Meanwhile, 14 soldiers who complained about their initial PTSD reviews were scheduled Tuesday to begin receiving the results of a new round of medical evaluations.
NATIONAL
April 25, 2012 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
SEATTLE — In a move to improve treatments for post-traumatic stress disorder, the Army is discouraging the use of traditional definitions such as feelings of fear, helplessness and horror — symptoms that may not be in a trained warrior's vocabulary. It also is recommending against the use of anti-anxiety and antipsychotic medications for such combat stress in favor of more proven drugs. The changes are reflected in a new policy document released this month, one that reflects a growing understanding of the "occupational" nature of the condition for many troops.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1993 | Reuters
Prime Minister John Major, whose popularity is at a record low, has turned to a "giggle clinic" to cheer himself up, Britain's Daily Mirror newspaper reported Friday. Psychotherapist Robert Holden told the paper that his clinic teaches people how to combat stress by having a good laugh.
NATIONAL
April 7, 2012 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
SEATTLE - U.S. Air Force pilot Patrick Burke's day started in the cockpit of a B-1 bomber near the Persian Gulf and proceeded across nine time zones as he ferried the aircraft home to South Dakota. Every four hours during the 19-hour flight, Burke swallowed a tablet of Dexedrine, the prescribed amphetamine known as "go pills. " After landing, he went out for dinner and drinks with a fellow crewman. They were driving back to Ellsworth Air Force Base when Burke began striking his friend in the head.
NATIONAL
March 18, 2012 | By David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
Drone crews protect U.S. ground troops by watching over them 24 hours a day from high above. Sitting before video screens thousands of miles from their remote-controlled aircraft, the crews scan for enemy ambushes and possible roadside bombs, while also monitoring what the military calls "patterns of life. " Only rarely do drone crews fire on the enemy. The rest of the time, they sit and watch. For hours on end. Day after day. It can get monotonous and, yes, boring. It can also be gut-wrenching.
NATIONAL
March 12, 2012 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
The call would soon become agonizingly familiar: A 28-year-old Army specialist from Joint Base Lewis-McChord, recently home from Afghanistan, had walked into a parking garage in Salt Lake City with a full set of body armor, ammunition clips and his AR-15 rifle. Five weeks before the 2010 incident, Spc. Brandon Barrett had gone absent without leave after a drunk driving arrest near the sprawling military base in Washington state and had begun sending ominous messages to friends. "About to show the world they shouldn't [mess]
NATIONAL
February 21, 2012 | By Kim Murphy
The head of the Army 's Madigan Healthcare System, one of the largest military hospitals on the West Coast, has been temporarily relieved of command amid an investigation over whether the Army has avoided diagnosing returning combat soldiers with post-traumatic stress disorder to save money. Col. Dallas Homas, a West Point graduate has been administratively removed from his position near Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Washington state, Army officials announced Monday. Homas had headed the busy medical center since March 2011.  Meanwhile, 14 soldiers who complained about their initial PTSD reviews were scheduled Tuesday to begin receiving the results of a new round of medical evaluations.
NEWS
May 3, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
Civilians who don the uniform and march into war carrying the psychological burden of previous trauma -- or of afflictions such as depression or anxiety disorder --  are far more likely than their mentally healthy comrades to suffer battle-related stress following deployment, new research has found. A study published this week in the Archives of General Psychiatry also found that women, African Americans and those with less education were slightly more likely to suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder ( PTSD )
NATIONAL
May 15, 2009
This week, five U.S. troops in Iraq were shot and killed in what military officials are calling the worst case of soldier-on-soldier violence since the war began. Sgt. John M. Russell, 44, has been charged with five counts of murder and one count of aggravated assault. Authorities say he opened fire Monday in a combat stress clinic at Camp Liberty in Baghdad. A military official said a day later that Russell had recently had his weapon taken away because of concerns about his behavior.
NEWS
February 17, 1991 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Army commanders have been told that the anticipated intensity of ground combat here will impose a severe mental strain that could result in one American casualty in four being a victim of battle fatigue, medical officers say. But the officers say psychiatrists now believe that the debilitating consequences of what was once called shellshock can be minimized by treatment near the battlefield and that patients in many cases can return to combat in a matter of days.
NATIONAL
March 12, 2012 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
The call would soon become agonizingly familiar: A 28-year-old Army specialist from Joint Base Lewis-McChord, recently home from Afghanistan, had walked into a parking garage in Salt Lake City with a full set of body armor, ammunition clips and his AR-15 rifle. Five weeks before the 2010 incident, Spc. Brandon Barrett had gone absent without leave after a drunk driving arrest near the sprawling military base in Washington state and had begun sending ominous messages to friends. "About to show the world they shouldn't [mess]
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 2007 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
CAMP PENDLETON -- The names -- while comic -- were meant to reflect an unfunny reality: the sometimes overbearing stress felt by Marines and sailors serving in Iraq. Such as Cpl. Angermode, who after a roadside bomb exploded in Ramadi began telling his fellow Marines that he couldn't wait to begin killing Iraqis. Chief Screamer, who dealt with his stress by screaming at everyone. And Lance Cpl. Stoneface, who just shut down emotionally and kept silently to himself.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2007 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
A national veterans advocacy group criticized Camp Pendleton on Thursday for its "discouraging" treatment of Marines who return from Iraq with signs of post-traumatic stress disorder.
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