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BUSINESS
October 22, 2002 | Bloomberg News
Comcast Corp. and 10 other cable-television system owners agreed to follow new guidelines for reporting certain operating figures, a move designed to give investors better information for evaluating the companies. The guidelines won't replace generally accepted accounting principles or affect financial statements. Instead, executives said they are seeking to eliminate inconsistencies in how their companies report operating statistics such as subscriber counts and capital expenditures.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2014 | By Meg James
Comcast Corp. has signed a licensing agreement with Sony Pictures Entertainment that will increase the number of titles offered for sale through Comcast's recently launched digital store. The deal with Sony is noteworthy because it allows Comcast customers to purchase digital copies of such Oscar-nominated movies as "American Hustle," and "Captain Phillips" from Comcast's Xfinity On Demand digital service. "American Hustle" will be available beginning Tuesday, and "Captain Phillips" and other movies, including "Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs 2," will be available within a few weeks.
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BUSINESS
September 18, 2002 | Bloomberg News
Comcast Corp.'s planned $56-billion purchase of AT&T Corp.'s cable television business cleared a regulatory hurdle at the Justice Department, the companies said. The waiting period under the Hart-Scott-Rodino antitrust act expired at midnight. The Federal Communications Commission still must approve the acquisition. Special Class A shares of Philadelphia-based Comcast rose 43 cents to $23.73 on Nasdaq. AT&T shares rose 31 cents to $12.63 on the NYSE.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2014 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
The advocacy group Consumers Union is urging federal regulators to scrutinize the deal struck between cable giant Comcast Corp. and the Internet streaming service Netflix. Netflix agreed to pay to directly connect to Comcast's network to improve the video quality of movies and TV shows streamed to subscribers, after many complained about deteriorating quality. Consumers Union, which publishes Consumer Reports magazine, called on Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler and U.S. Atty.
BUSINESS
July 7, 2004 | From Associated Press
Stephen Burke, president of Comcast Corp.'s cable division, was named to the additional post of chief operating officer of the nation's biggest cable television company. Burke will remain as head of Comcast Cable, which will operate with a restructured leadership team. Before coming to Comcast in 1998, Burke was an executive with Walt Disney Co., where he was president of ABC Broadcasting. Shares of Philadelphia-based Comcast fell 70 cents to $27.26 on Nasdaq.
BUSINESS
April 15, 2005 | From Reuters
A Seattle-area woman has sued Comcast Corp. for disclosing her name and contact information. Dawnell Leadbetter said she was contacted by a debt collection agency in January and told to pay $4,500 for downloading copyright-protected music or face a lawsuit. Leadbetter, a mother of two teenage children, was a subscriber to Comcast's high-speed Internet access. She said the agency was able to track her down using information that the Recording Industry Assn.
BUSINESS
February 15, 2008 | From Bloomberg News
Comcast Corp., the nation's largest cable operator, reported a 54% gain in fourth-quarter profit on solid revenue gains that were boosted by acquisitions and customers' increased spending for cable TV. In a bow to the desires of agitated shareholders unhappy with its weakened stock price, Comcast also said it would start paying a 6.25-cent quarterly dividend beginning at the end of April that is expected to increase over time. Comcast's stock was up $1.43 to $19.24.
BUSINESS
January 11, 1997 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Comcast Corp. has won the right to buy Time Warner Inc.'s controlling stake in cable's E! Entertainment Television, the celebrity news network, for $321 million. Comcast, the nation's fourth-largest cable company, said it should decide by early next month whether to proceed. Philadelphia-based Comcast is one of five cable operators that are partners in the network. Late last year, they kicked off the process for a change in ownership. E!, which is 58.
BUSINESS
February 14, 2002 | From Associated Press
Comcast Corp. promised amid criticism Wednesday to stop immediately recording the Web browsing activities of its 1 million high-speed Internet subscribers. One congressional member said collecting the data might have broken federal law. The president of Comcast's cable communications division, Stephen Burke, said the company will stop storing the information.
BUSINESS
October 29, 2002 | From Associated Press
Comcast Corp. posted third-quarter net income of $75.6 million, or 8 cents a share, an improvement over its net loss of $106.8 million, or 11 cents a share, for the same period last year. Revenue at the Philadelphia-based cable television system operator was up 12.7% to $2.7 billion for the period. Comcast also said that it expects to complete its merger with AT&T Corp.'s cable unit next month. The deal, which the companies value at $47.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2014 | By Joe Flint
Los Angeles, you may have a Houston problem. The Dodgers are expected to have a much better season than the lackluster Houston Astros, but fans of both teams may soon have a lot in common when it comes to watching the games on television. In Houston, a regional sports network owned by cable giant Comcast Corp., baseball's Astros and basketball's Rockets has struggled since launching in late 2012. Comcast was the only big distributor carrying it as other area pay-TV operators, including DirecTV and AT&T, resisted because they thought the price tag was too high.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2014 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski and Meg James
The landmark deal between Comcast Corp. and Netflix Inc. resolves a simmering dispute over who will support America's growing Internet video habit. Netflix has agreed to pay Comcast for a direct connection to the cable operator's broadband networks to ensure that Netflix customers receive an uninterrupted viewing experience when streaming movies and TV shows. The agreement, which was confirmed this weekend, comes after Netflix customers complained about deteriorating service, as videos they tried to watch stuttered and stalled in midstream.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2014 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
Updated to correct the name of Netflix's Open Connect initiative. Netflix Inc. has agreed to pay Comcast Corp. to ensure the online service's subscribers get seamless access to movies and TV shows delivered over the Internet, according to people familiar with the matter. The deal, which has been nearly a year in the making, would give Netflix direct access to Comcast's high-speed network, the two companies confirmed Sunday.  Terms were not disclosed. FACES TO WATCH 2014: Digital media The agreement could set a precedent in Netflix's dealings with other Internet access providers, such as AT&T and Verizon Communications.  For Netflix users who are Comcast subscribers, the pact should mean better quality.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2014 | By Joe Flint
The new distribution contract CBS Corp. signed with Time Warner Cable Inc. last summer after a bitter fight could be a casualty of Comcast Corp.'s proposed acquisition of the pay-TV operator. According to people familiar with the deal, it does not include provisions protecting all the terms of the pact should Time Warner Cable be acquired by a distributor with a sweeter arrangement. These people requested anonymity because the agreement is confidential. Terms of the CBS-Time Warner Cable pact were never publicly disclosed, but Comcast, which signed a 10-year distribution agreement with CBS in 2010, is believed to be paying a lower fee to carry the network's TV stations.
BUSINESS
February 19, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO - Google has unveiled an ambitious plan to expand its blazing-fast Internet service to millions of people in 34 more U.S. cities in the clearest sign yet that the Internet giant plans to challenge cable and phone companies in what could become a lucrative stand-alone business. Google said it would begin working with government officials in some of the nation's largest cities, including San Jose, Phoeniz, Atlanta and Portland, Ore., to explore extending Google Fiber there.
OPINION
February 16, 2014
Re "A media behemoth," Feb. 14 The proposed merger of Comcast Corp. and Time Warner Cable is unthinkable. For federal regulators, it should be dead on arrival. It is an example of media consolidation at its worst. The beneficiaries would be Comcast and Time Warner Cable, period. Consumers would be the big losers. To mitigate any negative effects on the public, Congress should pass legislation that mandates a la carte pricing for cable programming, allowing consumers to pay for only the channels they want.
BUSINESS
December 19, 1997 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER
Comcast Corp. plans to sell most of its stake in C3, the programming company it formed two years ago, to partner Richard Frank, the former head of Walt Disney Television. Frank said he has exercised an option to buy out Comcast and that controlling C3 will give him greater flexibility in striking alliances more suitable for the programming C3 will continue to pursue, such as series for prime time and cable. Frank declined to disclose the terms of the deal.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2004 | David Colker, Times Staff Writer
Now you can suffer rejection in the comfort of your own living room. Cable giant Comcast Corp. will begin airing three-to-five-minute video personals next month as part of its video-on-demand programming in its hometown of Philadelphia. It's perhaps the most open invitation to public ridicule since karaoke. "The goal is not to make anyone look like a dork," said Ken Deckinger, whose speed-dating service, HurryDate, will begin producing the videos this month.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2014 | By Meg James and Joe Flint
Comcast Corp. already produces movies, television shows and national and local news programs while operating theme parks and the largest pay-TV system in the U.S. And now, with one bold stroke, the Philadelphia conglomerate could dominate the flow of information and entertainment into American homes with historically unprecedented power. Comcast's proposed $45.2-billion takeover of Time Warner Cable would allow it to provide television, telephone and Internet service and even home security systems to nearly 30 million homes across the country.  ON LOCATION: Where the cameras roll   The company's reach would encompass the nation's largest markets, among them Los Angeles, New York, Chicago, Philadelphia, Washington D.C. and San Francisco.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2014 | By Meg James
Should Comcast Corp.'s $45-billion acquisition of Time Warner Cable be approved, the company plans to dispatch its ex-Navy SEAL. Neil Smit, Comcast Cable chief executive and a former Navy SEAL, this week was named Comcast's go-to guy: the executive who would closely oversee the integration of at least 8 million Time Warner Cable customers into Comcast, which already has nearly 22 million video subscribers. That means Smit also would be the point man overseeing upgrades to Time Warner Cable's systems in New York and Los Angeles, where 1.5 million homes have Time Warner Cable service.  ON LOCATION: Where the cameras roll   "Neil Smit will help lead this for us, and the track record of what's been happening at Comcast Cable is something that we're very, very proud of," Comcast Corp.
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