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BUSINESS
November 18, 1996 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Comdex, which is to computer trade shows what Liberace was to piano recitals, gets underway this week in Las Vegas. For those who aren't attending the show but want to see some of the spectacle, AST Research Inc. is planning its own cybercast of the event. The Irvine-based computer manufacturer said it will broadcast video of Comdex that computer users can view by logging on to the company's Web site at http://www.ast.com.
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BUSINESS
January 6, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien
Back in 1998, I was a fresh-faced technology reporter from North Carolina making my first journey to a mega-tech trade show in Las Vegas. Then, it was COMDEX that drew seemingly every tech company with a pulse to this desert city. During my four days there I walked miles of trade-show floor, wrote far too much, drank even more at way too many corporate networking parties, and slept about six hours total. My good judgment so completely abandoned me that at one point, I actually watched an entire performance by the B-52s.  It was an epic week, but it almost killed me. And so I vowed: Never again.
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BUSINESS
November 17, 2003 | Joseph Menn, Times Staff Writer
Microsoft Corp. Chairman Bill Gates kicked off a scaled-down Comdex technology convention in Las Vegas on Sunday with a demonstration of future products he said would improve customer security, cut down spam and allow easy searches of what computer users have viewed but not stored.
BUSINESS
June 24, 2004 | Alex Pham, Times Staff Writer
Comdex, the Las Vegas trade show that grew as fast as chip speeds during the technology boom, has flashed the blue screen of death. Organizers Wednesday canceled the annual gathering, which grew from 4,000 techies in a single ballroom in 1979 to become an iconic event that lured more than 210,000 exhibitors, buyers and gawkers.
NEWS
November 15, 2001 | CHRISTINE FREY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If many of the high-tech goodies at this week's Comdex trade show in Las Vegas seemed familiar, it's because they've been talked about for years. Mobile phones married to hand-held computers. Notepad-size tablets doing the work of a PC. Computers that run the home entertainment system. Now, they're here--or at least getting closer. Even though the engineers have shown it can be built, the key question remains: Can it be sold?
BUSINESS
November 19, 1997 | GREG MILLER
The giants of the computer industry recited a new mantra at the Comdex trade show here this week: small business, small business, small business. Companies large and small set aside much of their precious real estate on the convention floor to demonstrate hundreds of new products tailored to small businesses, ranging from modular networking equipment to simplified accounting software.
BUSINESS
December 25, 1997 | Associated Press
IBM is pulling out of the world's largest computer show, saying that Comdex has gotten too big. Next year would be the first in the show's 20-year history without IBM. Comdex organizers estimated that 220,000 people saw last month's show in Las Vegas, which IBM attended. "We don't think Comdex is the best way to reach our customers," said John Bukovinsky, a spokesman for the Armonk, N.Y.-based computer giant.
BUSINESS
November 15, 1999 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 200,000 people and 2,200 companies are gathering in Las Vegas this week for Comdex, the biggest computer-related conference and trade show of the year. Since its founding 20 years ago, Comdex has morphed into an extravaganza that fills three giant hotels plus the Las Vegas Convention Center and spans five days.
BUSINESS
August 11, 1997 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Comdex '97, the big daddy of all computer trade conferences, is 13 weeks away. And already Orange County technology companies are worried about the show, to be held in Las Vegas on Nov. 17 to 21. They aren't fretting about snagging a good spot on the city's convention center floor. They aren't sweating over products that might not be ready to launch. Their primary concern is whether they can get on a plane heading to Nevada on Nov. 16.
BUSINESS
November 23, 1998 | JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While Orange County companies were well-represented among Comdex exhibitors, with Conexant, Toshiba, Mitsubishi and Ingram Micro taking up significant real estate in the massive Las Vegas Convention Center, Irvine-based Western Digital Corp. was among the more notable absentees, and the largest local technology company not present.
BUSINESS
November 17, 2003 | Joseph Menn, Times Staff Writer
Microsoft Corp. Chairman Bill Gates kicked off a scaled-down Comdex technology convention in Las Vegas on Sunday with a demonstration of future products he said would improve customer security, cut down spam and allow easy searches of what computer users have viewed but not stored.
BUSINESS
November 18, 2002 | Joseph Menn, Times Staff Writer
Microsoft Corp. Chairman Bill Gates kicked off the annual Comdex computer show Sunday with a prediction that the same high-volume, low-cost economics that put a PC in most U.S. homes will soon give consumers new varieties of inexpensive and useful gadgets. In a keynote speech dedicated to debunking gloomy expectations for the beleaguered technology industry, Gates demonstrated a new category of Microsoft software for what he called "smart personal object technology," or SPOT.
BUSINESS
November 15, 2002 | James F. Peltz, Times Staff Writer
Just 72 hours before the opening of the huge computer trade show Comdex, the Los Angeles-based company that runs the event said Thursday that it probably faces a sale or merger because it is plagued with losses and can't pay its debt. Key3Media Group Inc. is being crushed by a heavy debt burden at the same time the technology industry's collapse and post-Sept. 11 cuts in business travel have eroded attendance at shows such as Comdex, a four-day event that starts Sunday in Las Vegas.
NEWS
November 15, 2001 | CHRISTINE FREY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If many of the high-tech goodies at this week's Comdex trade show in Las Vegas seemed familiar, it's because they've been talked about for years. Mobile phones married to hand-held computers. Notepad-size tablets doing the work of a PC. Computers that run the home entertainment system. Now, they're here--or at least getting closer. Even though the engineers have shown it can be built, the key question remains: Can it be sold?
NEWS
November 15, 2001 | JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the giant Comdex trade show this week, Microsoft Corp. Chairman Bill Gates showed off some eye-popping video games on his company's new Xbox console. A day later, Sony Corp. President Kunitake Ando demonstrated what his PlayStation 2 could do--not with games, but with a movie. The game console acted as a bridge between a personal computer and a television set, wirelessly receiving the movie "Vertical Limit" from the PC and displaying it on the TV.
BUSINESS
November 12, 2001 | JON HEALEY and JOSEPH MENN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Everything about this year's Comdex Fall exhibition, the tech industry's mammoth trade show that kicked off here over the weekend, is a bit thinner than in years past. Despite bargain hotel rates, the crowd is expected to be 25% smaller than it was in 2000. About 150,000 to 160,000 badge-toting attendees and some 2,000 exhibitors will be here looking for signs of a rally in the moribund tech economy, but most suspect they won't find many.
BUSINESS
November 13, 1995 | From Associated Press
Traffic gridlock, packed hotels and long lines at restaurants are expected this week as 200,000 people attend the annual Comdex computer trade show. For the past week, an endless line of tractor-trailer rigs has delivered exhibition materials to the Las Vegas Convention Center. Four temporary buildings representing 200,000 square feet have been built because the convention center's 1.3 million square feet of space is not enough. Las Vegas hotels and motels, with 95,000 rooms, are full.
BUSINESS
November 18, 1998 | LAWRENCE J. MAGID, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If you have a business to run, you're probably not attending the 19th annual fall Comdex show here this week. Here's some of what you missed: Paragon Software (http://www.paragonsoftware.com) found an easier way to add contacts to your cellular phone's memory than fiddling with the phone keys. The British company's FoneSync Simply Communicating Software comes with a cable that lets you transfer names and phone numbers from a PC to a cell phone.
BUSINESS
November 6, 2001 | Associated Press
High-tech gadgets may be the focal point at Comdex, the nation's largest technology trade show, but trusty laptops will not be welcome this year amid tightened security. On the Comdex Web site, organizers have asked attendees of next week's event in Las Vegas to "please leave bags, briefcases, backpacks, laptops, etc. at home or in your hotel room." No laptops at a computer trade show? "Yes, it's going to be a zoo. It will be inconvenient, and it will cause some lines.
NEWS
November 16, 2000 | JON HEALEY, jon.healey@latimes.com
The fall edition of Comdex is the tech industry's largest trade show in North America, with more than 2,100 exhibitors trying to sell all manner of hardware, software and vaporware to a slack-jawed throng of more than 200,000. Although it's aimed mainly at corporate buyers, there's plenty of stuff on hand for consumers--particularly those who don't have the good sense to wait a few years for more reliable, cheaper versions of the same technology.
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