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Comedy Clubs

NEWS
September 24, 2000 | SUSAN VAUGHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
While finishing his studies at Harvard Law School in 1992, Sean Carter did a funny thing: He took to the stages of local comedy clubs to perform stand-up routines. Carter loved the excitement of telling jokes before a live audience. He enjoyed making people laugh. But as graduation neared, he turned his attention back to law. Today the 33-year-old Chino Hills resident is an in-house attorney for an Irvine-based mortgage company, earning more than $100,000 annually.
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NEWS
July 29, 1993 | DENNIS McLELLAN, Dennis McLellan is a Times staff writer who regularly writes about comedy for OC Live!
Steve Kelley says the first time he performed in a comedy club, someone in the audience yelled out, "Don't quit your day job!" Kelley, whose credits include five appearances on "The Tonight Show" over the past two years, has come a long way since making his stand-up debut at an open-mike night at a San Diego comedy club in 1986. But he still hasn't given up his day job.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 1988 | DUNCAN STRAUSS
As Orange County's newest comedy nightspot, Coconuts in Anaheim takes a decidedly modest approach compared to the high-profile Improvisation Comedy Club in Irvine and the 11-year-old Laff Stop in Newport Beach, which proclaims itself "America's Premiere Comedy Nightclub." "Basically, we're kind of a mom-and-pop comedy club," said Brian Craft, who owns Coconuts with partner Kelly Renner. "I mean, Kelly hits the lights while I'm reaching into the closet to turn off the cassette.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1992 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If the proprietors of Bruce Baum's Comedy Crib were hoping to catch some slack on opening night Wednesday, they didn't get much--not from the comedians on stage, at least. "Welcome to Dachau, everybody," cracked middle act Terry Mulroy, as a loud and persistent hissing sound interrupted his set. When the intermittent noise returned during Bill Kirchenbauer's routine, the evening's headliner asked: "Does this building have gas?"
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2001 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
The Borscht Belt, located in New York's Catskill Mountains, was the cradle of much of post-World War II American comedy. A squad of Catskills-style comics arrived in Beverly Hills Tuesday, when "Catskills on Broadway" began a two-week run at the Wilshire Theatre. Presiding over the evening is Freddie Roman, a veteran comic who's also the dean of the New York Friars Club, home of the famous celebrity roasts. Roman created "Catskills on Broadway" 10 years ago.
BUSINESS
April 5, 2009 | Nathan Olivarez-Giles
The gig: Owner of the Laugh Factory, considered one of the best comedy clubs in the country. The flagship club on Sunset Boulevard in Hollywood has been open since 1979. Last year, Masada opened a $10-million location in Long Beach. Background: At age 14, Masada came to the U.S. from Iran. The year was 1976, just before the Iranian Revolution, and Masada was hoping to find work and support his family, who had immigrated to Israel.
MAGAZINE
January 27, 1991 | EDWARD A. GARGAN, Edward A. Gargan writes from New York. He does not own a television.
I'm not sure it's time to be alarmed. There are, though, debates, even discussions, about this. I'm troubled by it myself. It's a very simple matter, really: Is America draining away its reserves of laughter? Don't laugh. Recently, a friend was ruffling through his guide to cable television, America's IV tube, trying to find something that didn't require laughing. You see, he's used up his laughs.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1991 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Satire, so the saying goes, is what closes Saturday night. According to Budd Friedman and Mark Lonow, founders of the Improv Comedy Club, comedy is what dies on Oscar night. Calling comedy "the stepchild of the motion picture academy" and citing its traditionally low representation in the awards, Friedman and Lonow are collecting signatures in their 14 comedy clubs nationwide for a petition establishing three new Oscar categories: best comedy and best male and female comic acting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1997 | RUSS LOAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jeff Jena was 31 years old and teaching at one of the most prestigious prep schools in the country when he decided to give it all up for show business. At least for a year. Jena was a teacher at Cranbrook School in Bloomfield Hills, Mich., and had spent his off-hours during the last four years writing and performing comedy. "I'd always wanted to be a comedian.
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