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BUSINESS
August 4, 1993 | Bloomberg Business News
Marvel Comics Ltd., the publisher of Spider Man and the Incredible Hulk comic books, has sued upstart rival Defiant over an action character Marvel introduces next month. "They are aggressive competitors and turf warriors," said James Shooter of the two firms he worked with as a principal executive at Defiant and former editor-in-chief at Marvel. The filing Tuesday in Manhattan federal court accuses Defiant of infringing on Marvel's trademark for "Plasmer."
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NATIONAL
May 10, 2002 | From Associated Press
Is Spiderman's web really strong enough to support him as he swings from building to building? Why did Superman's home planet of Krypton explode? How much would the Flash need to eat in order to run around the globe in 80 seconds? The man to ask is University of Minnesota physics professor Jim Kakalios. Kakalios is entering his second semester teaching an elective course for freshmen called Science in Comic Books. He says using comic books to teach the fundamentals of physics is a great way to stimulate his students.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2007
Jenna Jameson's next new lover may be a demon. The porn icon, entrepreneur and bestselling author will be the star of her own comic book, "Shadow Hunter," which she will promote this weekend at Comic-Con International in San Diego. Jameson said Tuesday that she will have "a hands-on role" with the stories in the comic book, which will be published, beginning in December, by Virgin Comics, a company that also has creator deals with Nicolas Cage, John Woo and Guy Ritchie.
MAGAZINE
June 10, 1990 | BARBARA DENATALE
THOSE STILL FASCINATED with the real (that is, comic-book) Superman, Batman and Spiderman can thank Rick Werft, owner of the Comic Castle in Fullerton and Funtime Comics in Pomona, for keeping their larger-than-life heroes alive in all their original glory. Both shops stock impressive comic-book collections that date from the 1940s and '50s (the Golden Age of the comic book) through the '60s (the Silver Age), until present day.
NEWS
December 25, 1986 | RONALD L. SOBLE, Times Staff Writer
Question: Could you give me some information about Alex Schomburg, the famous comic book artist whose work appears to be demanding top dollars these days?--C.T. Answer: A number of readers have asked about Schomburg's artwork. The December issue of the Collectors Showcase auction catalogue (1708 N. Vine St., Hollywood, Calif. 90028), is offering a full-color cover painting by Schomburg in the $2,000-to-$3,000 range.
NEWS
July 30, 2001
Comic strips are closer to extinction than comic books ("The Disappearing Comic Book," July 17). The writing and artwork in monthly comic books are at a peak, whereas daily comic strips are underwritten and indifferently drawn. With its Vertigo, Wildstorm, America's Best Comics, Cliffhanger and Homage Comics imprints, DC Comics has the most impressive collection of talent in the industry. Marvel may have the big-screen projects coming out, but the comics that inspired them are in a messy state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2004 | Richard Fausset, Times Staff Writer
He was the most unlikely of supermen: a former accountant and real estate agent with a love of comic books, whose incredible powers were mostly confined to yo-yo tricks. But William Liebowitz, founder of the Golden Apple Comics store, was a hero nonetheless in Hollywood's alternate universe of comic book artists, collectors and pop-culture junkies. His death last month at age 63 was a loss, as one patron put it, of a "true pioneer of L.A. culture."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1988 | T. W. McGARRY
Reading was sort of defended at opposite poles of the Valley Sunday. The eastern front was held by the little troops of the kingdom of the lurid and the bizarre, who massed in a pair of shabby garages in a tawdry section of North Hollywood. The western ramparts were made of money and good taste in Westlake Village. Not since Churchill and Stalin were on the same side have there been such mismatched allies.
NEWS
December 8, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
As the creator of the comic book "Zen, Intergalactic Ninja" sees it, most of today's space aliens are either bad guys or wimps. Enter Zen, a short, muscular, blue-skinned space warrior, a no-nonsense sort of extraterrestrial. "Sort of the Dirty Harry of aliens," said his creator, Steve Stern. Rather than spattering small-time villains with a big revolver like the Clint Eastwood film character, however, Zen addresses the big questions.
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