Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsComic Strip
IN THE NEWS

Comic Strip

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1989 | DANIEL CERONE and SHAUNA SNOW, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Back on the 'Far Side': New installments of the cult comic strip "The Far Side" will return to newspapers across America on New Year's Day, following a 14-month hiatus. Cartoonist Gary Larson took a break on Oct. 30, 1988, from one of the most successful panels in comic-strip history. During that time, newspapers ran reprints of earlier "classic" cartoons. The only thing Larson drew on his sabbatical was an album cover for jazz guitarist Herb Ellis--in exchange for guitar lessons.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 2014 | By Steve Chawkins
When Morrie Turner was just a cartoon-doodling kid in Oakland, he wrote a fan letter to the creator of the popular comic strip "Terry and the Pirates. " In return, Milton Caniff, who later created "Steve Canyon," sent young Turner a typed, six-page personal reply with pointers on story lines and drawing. "It changed my whole life," Turner told the San Francisco Chronicle in 2005. "The fact that he took the time to share all that with a kid, a stranger, didn't impress me all that much at the time.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 2012 | By Marisa Gerber, Los Angeles Times
Jeff Millar, the wordsmith behind the long-running comic strip "Tank McNamara," which evolved into a biting satire of the sports world, died Nov. 30. He was 70. The Texas native, who also was a longtime film critic and columnist for the Houston Chronicle, died at his Houston-area home after an almost four-year battle with bile-duct cancer, said his wife, Peg. The daily, syndicated comic strip - with a hefty-jawed protagonist who matured from...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 2013 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Stan Lynde, creator of the syndicated western comic strip "Rick O'Shay," which ran for 20 years in major newspapers and reached about 15 million readers, died Tuesday of cancer in Helena, Mont. He was 81. Lynde was a Korean War veteran who had studied journalism at the University of Montana and briefly worked on his family's ranch in Colorado when he realized he wanted to try to make it as a cartoonist. After buying a one-way ticket to New York City in the 1950s, he worked his way up to commodities reporter at the Wall Street Journal while attending the School of Visual Arts at night.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 2013 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Stan Lynde, creator of the syndicated western comic strip "Rick O'Shay," which ran for 20 years in major newspapers and reached about 15 million readers, died Tuesday of cancer in Helena, Mont. He was 81. Lynde was a Korean War veteran who had studied journalism at the University of Montana and briefly worked on his family's ranch in Colorado when he realized he wanted to try to make it as a cartoonist. After buying a one-way ticket to New York City in the 1950s, he worked his way up to commodities reporter at the Wall Street Journal while attending the School of Visual Arts at night.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 2014 | By Steve Chawkins
When Morrie Turner was just a cartoon-doodling kid in Oakland, he wrote a fan letter to the creator of the popular comic strip "Terry and the Pirates. " In return, Milton Caniff, who later created "Steve Canyon," sent young Turner a typed, six-page personal reply with pointers on story lines and drawing. "It changed my whole life," Turner told the San Francisco Chronicle in 2005. "The fact that he took the time to share all that with a kid, a stranger, didn't impress me all that much at the time.
NEWS
March 19, 1995
Re "Comic Strip Characters Have Needs Too" (March 3): For the first time in about 25 years, I have found myself eagerly turning to the comic strip "Rex Morgan, M.D." to find out what is happening. It seems he and nurse June Gale have actually fallen in love and are engaged to be married. How fortunate they have not grown fat, flabby, gray or wrinkled like so many of the rest of us. It is truly amazing. GWYNN BOYER Altadena
NEWS
December 15, 1990
Bert Whitman, 82, editorial cartoonist for the Phoenix Gazette who transformed the radio serial "The Green Hornet" into a comic strip. The Brooklyn-born Whitman taught himself to draw, and in 1924, at age 16, began working for the Los Angeles Times. He went on to a succession of newspapers, and created a steady stream of political cartoons, comic strips and comic books. He drew the "Hornet" in the early 1940s.
NEWS
November 9, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Bill Hoest, whose award-winning comic strip "The Lockhorns," has had Leroy and Loretta Lockhorn at odds for two decades, has died at age 62. Hoest, of Lloyd Neck, died Monday of lymphoma at New York Medical Center. "The Lockhorns," which celebrated its 20th anniversary in September, is syndicated to more than 500 newspapers worldwide. Hoest also produced the comic strips "What a Guy!"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1993 | CHIP JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Zeke Zekley watched quietly as people bid thousands of dollars for the kinds of comic strip panels he was paid $50 a week to draw in the 1930s. "I never had any idea that these drawings would become as popular as they are today," said the 78-year-old retired cartoonist, looking around at almost 300 original comic strip panels being auctioned off Sunday at the Burbank Airport Hilton's convention center. One of Zekley's "Bringing Up Father" strips that ran in newspapers across the nation on Aug.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 2012 | By Marisa Gerber, Los Angeles Times
Jeff Millar, the wordsmith behind the long-running comic strip "Tank McNamara," which evolved into a biting satire of the sports world, died Nov. 30. He was 70. The Texas native, who also was a longtime film critic and columnist for the Houston Chronicle, died at his Houston-area home after an almost four-year battle with bile-duct cancer, said his wife, Peg. The daily, syndicated comic strip - with a hefty-jawed protagonist who matured from...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
I first encountered Julia Wertz with her 2010 graphic memoir “Drinking at the Movies,” a relentless and, at times, lacerating self-portrait of the artist as a young woman wrestling with alcohol. “Drinking at the Movies” was not Wertz's first autobiographical comic - her earlier work is gathered in two collections, “The Fart Party Vol. 1” and “The Fart Party Vol. 2” - but it represents a bridge between the narrow form of the comic strip (many of its chapters are a single page)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2012 | By Chris Barton
Maybe most recognizable for sharp, crudely drawn comics explaining dog behavior or the music industry , Web comic strip the Oatmeal has moved into the fundraising arena with a recent campaign in support of a Nikola Tesla museum in Shoreham, N.Y. The comic's creator Matthew Inman called Tesla, the Serbian American inventor of alternating current,  "the greatest geek who ever lived" in a recent strip (which, be forewarned, features the...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2012 | By Steve Appleford, Los Angeles Times
Tony Millionaire spends his nights in the garage. That's where you'll find him, in a space built just wide enough for a Model T, bent over his drawing table until 4 a.m., a beer never far from his fingertips. The wife and kids can hear him in there, listening to talk radio or laughing and shouting, with the occasional crash when things are not going well. He is happy this way, a cartoonist left to his own whims and solitude at his 1926 home in Pasadena, drawing his weekly "Maakies" comic strip about a hard-drinking, suicidal crow or his ongoing series of portraits of the famous and infamous for publications such as the Believer and New York Magazine.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
If there's a common thread among bestselling books for elementary school boys, it's the merry mischief maker traipsing through a comics-laden landscape. It is now a common literary trajectory that boys begin their independent reading lives following Dav Pilkey's prankster duo in the "Captain Underpants" series before moving on to Jeff Kinney's "Diary of a Wimpy Kid" books and the more recent phenom, "Big Nate," from author and illustrator Lincoln Peirce. Peirce isn't as well known as Pilkey or Kinney, though all three authors are in their 40s. Peirce has racked up 4 million sales since his first book was published in 2009, but that pales next to Pilkey (with more than 50 million copies in print)
OPINION
February 4, 2012 | Patt Morrison
Every presidential campaign turns out to be a quadrennial godsend for editorial cartoonists, but for Lalo Alcaraz, 2012 is a jubilee year. Herman Cain, chowing down at a Miami restaurant, asks, “How do you say 'delicious' in Cuban?” Newt Gingrich uses “bilingual education” and “language of living in a ghetto” in the same sentence. And then there's Mitt Romney, son of a Mexican-born Mormon who also ran for president of the United States. Or the “United Estates,” according to Romney's mysterious alter-Tweeter, @MexicanMitt , who's muy simpatico with his staunch “supporter” Alcaraz.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2008 | Sherry Stern
Berkeley Breathed is pulling the plug on his comic "Opus" after Nov. 2 and on his career as a comic strip artist. The 5-year-old Sunday comic with a political bent, starring the penguin from Breathed's classic comic "Bloom County," is ending just before the presidential election. In an e-mail to The Times, Breathed, 51, wrote Monday: "30 years of cartooning to end. I'm destroying the village to save it. Opus would inevitably become a ranting mouthpiece in the coming wicked days, and I respect the other parts of him too much to see that happen.
TRAVEL
January 1, 2012 | By Susan Spano, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Director Steven Spielberg's "The Adventures of Tintin" starts innocently enough - with Tintin, it always does - at a flea market, where the dauntless boy reporter finds an old model boat. But blistering barnacles! - as his buddy Capt. Haddock would say - there's a secret inside about a long-lost pirate treasure. So Tintin sets out to find it, undeterred by goons with guns, crashes, explosions, cracks on the skull from behind. Hold it. Rewind. That flea market? I think I've seen it before.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Bil Keane, a cartoonist who chronicled the lighter moments of family life for more than 50 years through the gentle, heartfelt humor of the "Family Circus" comic strip, has died. He was 89. Keane died Tuesday of congestive heart failure at his longtime home in Paradise Valley, Ariz., according to King Features Syndicate, which distributes the daily comic. The first cartoon appeared in 19 newspapers on Feb. 29, 1960. It is a drawing of a census taker who inquires of a puzzled woman surrounded by a roomful of toys: "Any children?"
Los Angeles Times Articles
|