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NEWS
November 14, 2002 | Maria Elena Fernandez, Times Staff Writer
The creator of "L.A. Cucaracha" is going national with "La Cucaracha," a rare Latino-themed syndicated daily comic strip, which promises more fodder from the Spanglish, warped world of its main character. Creator Lalo Alcaraz, 38, of Los Angeles signed a 10-year contract with Universal Press Syndicate, which also syndicates "Doonesbury" and "The Boondocks," to begin his biting and satirical strip on Nov. 25.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2008 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Gustavo Arriola, a cartoonist who created "Gordo," a pioneering comic strip that celebrated Latino culture and traditions, has died. He was 90. Arriola died Saturday of complications from cancer and Parkinson's disease at his home in Carmel, said his wife Mary Frances. Known as "Gus," Arriola launched his cartoon in 1941 featuring Gordo Lopez, a Mexican bean farmer, as the main character.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2008 | Sherry Stern, Times Staff Writer
The creator of the popular comic strip "For Better or for Worse" has had a change of heart -- literally and figuratively -- and won't be retiring after all. Lynn Johnston announced Wednesday that, beginning Sept. 1, "For Better or for Worse" will be retold in a blending of repeat and new comic strips. Not long ago, Johnston, 61, had planned to retire this year and offer mostly reruns of her 29-year-old comic strip.
NEWS
October 13, 2000 | CANDACE A. WEDLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Comic relief may not always be at one's fingertips, but there's no reason why it can't be at the neck and wrists. A Napa-based toy company called OddzOn is making an unusual line of jewelry with beads created from rolled-up comic strips--the colorful Sunday kind. Miniaturized replicas of original comic strips such as Archie, Baby Huey, Casper the Friendly Ghost, Little Lulu and Garfield are reprinted on recycled paper that is lighter than copy paper but heavier than comic or newsprint.
NEWS
February 28, 2000
Eliot A. Caplin, 86, writer who plotted such comic strips as "The Heart of Juliet Jones." Despite the difference in their professional surnames, Caplin was the brother of "L'il Abner" cartoonist Al Capp. The brothers never collaborated on a comic strip, but Capp conceived two strips that he passed along to Caplin. One, "Abbie an' Slats," drawn by Raeburn van Burne, lasted 23 years. The other was "Long Sam," drawn by Bob Lubbers.
NEWS
March 15, 1997
Stan Drake, 75, who illustrated the comic strip "Blondie." Drake also created the classic romance strip "The Heart of Juliet Jones," a collaboration with writer Elliott Caplin launched in 1953. Drake's work on the romance strip, which at its peak appeared in 600 newspapers, earned him the story strip cartoonist of the year award from the National Cartoonists Society in 1969, 1970 and 1972.
NEWS
November 8, 1991 | DAVE LESHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vice President Dan Quayle, in Southern California for fund-raising appearances, said Thursday that "Doonesbury" cartoonist Garry Trudeau has a personal vendetta against him and that he is outraged the comic strip is running discredited allegations that the vice president has used cocaine. "I don't mind a good political fight," Quayle said at a morning news conference. "But this is just totally absurd. It's wrong. It's false. And I'm not surprised, but I am outraged."
NEWS
April 13, 2006 | Alex Chun
Dan Piraro loves getting hate mail, and given that his occasionally left-leaning strip, "Bizarro," appears in 250 papers (including The Times), he's received a lot of it during his 21-year career. "Whenever I do an anti-NRA cartoon, I get a wave of great mail," says the syndicated comic strip artist, 47, from Brooklyn. "If I do something on gay rights, I get a really great wave of illiterate mail. And if I do something on intelligent design, that really brings the nut bags out of the woodworks."
NEWS
December 6, 1989 | CAROL CLEAVELAND, THE ALLENTOWN MORNING CALL
Attention shoppers! The following items, thanks to the comics industry's expanded nucleus of marketing devices, are now available at your local department store: Garfield balloons, greeting cards and pajama tops. Garfield coffee cups, party napkins, alarm clocks, nightgowns, stuffed toys and stickers. Garfield shirts, calendars, books, house slippers, mud flaps for trucks, bookmarks and women's underwear. Not to mention Garfield on suction cups clinging to car windows.
NEWS
November 2, 1988 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, Times Staff Writer
Cartoons have come a long way since Popeye's promotion of spinach was the most controversial cause to be found on the comics page. Today it's not unusual to see weeks of strips devoted to such issues as homelessness, illiteracy and drug use, and politics has been a contemporary element since "Pogo" took on Washington more than two decades ago. Jim Berry ("Berry's World") recently chided George Bush for ducking interviews.
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