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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2007 | Claire Noland, Times Staff Writer
Cartoonist Johnny Hart, who created the popular Stone Age comic strip "B.C." and generated controversy in recent years with overtly religious themes reflecting his evangelical Christian beliefs, died Saturday, the day before Easter. He was 76. Hart, who also collaborated with Brant Parker on the medieval comic strip "The Wizard of Id," died of a stroke while working at his home studio in Nineveh, N.Y., his wife, Bobby, told the Associated Press. "B.C.
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BOOKS
December 31, 2006 | Ed Park, Ed Park is a founding editor of the Believer.
"BE adequite," wrote Lindsay Lohan, signing off on her heartfelt missive reflecting on the death of Robert Altman, her director in "A Prairie Home Companion." The misspelling caused titters in the usual gossip venues, but for a reader of the new collection of E.C. Segar's original Popeye comics, Lohan's variant has its charms. From the start (1929), Popeye has entertained us as much by creatively mangling the language as by drubbing a wide variety of his opponents.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2006 | Mitch Stacy, Associated Press
Near as Dean Young can recall, Dagwood Bumstead started creating colossal sandwiches in his modest cartoon kitchen around 1936. Through the years, the overstuffed works of edible art built by the bumbling patriarch of the "Blondie" comic strip have become familiar to millions around the world who take respite in the funny pages.
OPINION
November 27, 2006 | Joshua Fruhlinger, JOSHUA FRUHLINGER is a freelance editor and writer who lives in Baltimore. He writes his own blog, the Comics Curmudgeon, and contributes to the political blog Wonkette. Contact him at comicsjfruh.com.
IT WAS EITHER A GENUINE sign of the end times or proof that hipsters can get into anything, but this summer and fall Aldomania sparked a national "Mary Worth" craze. In case the above sentence makes no sense to you, "Mary Worth" is a 68-year-old soap-opera comic strip about a nosey, passive-aggressive widow who is now (and always has been) about 68 years old.
BOOKS
October 15, 2006 | R. Sikoryak, R. Sikoryak's cartoons have appeared in Drawn & Quarterly, Nickelodeon Magazine and on "The Daily Show With Jon Stewart."
[Note: Review presented as a comic strip. See archived page for full content. Text of comic strip not included here.]
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2006 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
Offering little in the way of sophistication or memorable characters, the disappointingly pedestrian computer-animated "Over the Hedge" will be more entertaining for little tykes than their older siblings and parents, and would not seem out of place on Saturday morning television.
NEWS
May 11, 2006
Over the years I have watched with disdain as the Sunday and weekday comics get "edited" by what looks more like the accounting department rather than real newspaper editors ["Comic Strips' Plight Isn't Funny," by Alex Chun, April 27]. Instead of sitting back and relaxing with the Sunday comics like I used to do, I now breeze through them in about two minutes. To make matters worse, the overall creativity of the comic strip artists is not there anymore either. How about this as a possible solution: Publish a Sunday comic section that is huge.
NEWS
April 27, 2006 | Alex Chun, Special to The Times
IN an upcoming "Opus" Sunday comic strip, Berkeley Breathed's affable waterfowl Opus comes across an iPod-toting twentysomething who has no clue what a newspaper is. In the strip's eight little boxes, Breathed succinctly sums up the plight of not only newspapers but also the comic strips contained therein: They "are trying to reach kids who literally have never picked up a newspaper before," says Breathed, who burst on the national comics scene in 1980 with the cult-classic "Bloom County."
NEWS
April 13, 2006 | Alex Chun
Dan Piraro loves getting hate mail, and given that his occasionally left-leaning strip, "Bizarro," appears in 250 papers (including The Times), he's received a lot of it during his 21-year career. "Whenever I do an anti-NRA cartoon, I get a wave of great mail," says the syndicated comic strip artist, 47, from Brooklyn. "If I do something on gay rights, I get a really great wave of illiterate mail. And if I do something on intelligent design, that really brings the nut bags out of the woodworks."
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