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ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2011
Molly Prather will be hosting the Armando Show at iO West Theatre, 6366 Hollywood Blvd., Saturday, 9 p.m., $10. Info: west.ioimprov.com Ron Babcock will perform stand up at the Downtown Independent Theater, 251 S. Main St., downtown L.A., Tuesday, 9 p.m., Free. Info: holyfreecomedy.com
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014
Charles Sumner 'Chuck' Stone Jr. Columnist and educator helped found association for black journalists Charles Sumner "Chuck" Stone Jr., 89, a longtime journalist and educator who was one of the founders of the National Assn. of Black Journalists, died Sunday at an assisted living facility in Chapel Hill, N.C., according to his daughter Allegra Stone. The cause was not given. Many who helped launch the association credited Stone as the driving force behind its founding, said its current president, Bob Butler.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
I first encountered Julia Wertz with her 2010 graphic memoir “Drinking at the Movies,” a relentless and, at times, lacerating self-portrait of the artist as a young woman wrestling with alcohol. “Drinking at the Movies” was not Wertz's first autobiographical comic - her earlier work is gathered in two collections, “The Fart Party Vol. 1” and “The Fart Party Vol. 2” - but it represents a bridge between the narrow form of the comic strip (many of its chapters are a single page)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2014 | By David Colker
Comedian David Brenner, who vaulted to fame through his appearances on the "Tonight Show" in the 1970s, died at home in New York on Saturday. The cause was cancer, said his former publicist, Jeff Abraham, who issued a statement on behalf of Brenner's family. He was 78. Brenner was working as recently as December, with club dates in Toronto and other spots, Abraham said. The comedian was a favorite of "Tonight Show" host Johnny Carson at a time when appearances on the late-night program could ensure success for a comic.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2011 | By Deborah Vankin, Los Angeles Times
"A guy who's so funny and kills me right now is on 'Parks and Recreation:' Nick Offerman. He's someone, I think, who's in that vein of 'overnight sensation who's been working for 20 years' and no one knows about it. Nick's not a young guy, but he's someone who's so distinct and plays these great, bizarre characters. He's fantastic. And he's finally getting attention now, and a shot he really deserves. He's just dry and bizarre and weird. Oh, and has a great mustache. " For a zany night, Will Ferrell style, watch Nick Offerman on "Parks and Recreation" 9:30 p.m. Thursdays on NBC. deborah.vankin@latimes.com
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2011
There's a comedian I really like ? Brad Williams. He's a so-called little person, which is the phrase. He's a real heavyweight, a smart person with big heart. Watch for him ? really, really funny. He could do for the so-called little person, dwarfs, what Richard Pryor did for Stepin Fetchit. He breaks all the barriers down. He just gets up there and says, 'Look at me ? these are my little arms.' He's really funny. Real smart. He's real special. ?As told to Deborah Vankin
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2011
"Ron Babcock ? he's definitely emerging in that alternative comics world. The thing I love about Ron is that he's like that guy that you sat next to in Spanish class who was always cracking jokes and getting you in trouble for laughing. And now he's still that guy, but he's also way cool and didn't get all fat like those other guys did from high school. "He's very observational ? he has this great bit about this book about evolution and dinosaurs ? he's definitely the smartest guy in the room.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2010 | By Deborah Vankin, Los Angeles Times
"I love Maria Bamford. She makes me laugh. I think she's hysterically funny. She performs all over the place [in LA]. Have you seen her? She's so funny ? she's one of the few people that really makes you laugh hard, who's doing something so interesting and insane. She does a lot of voices. She has a very high voice and she does a lot of characters and people in her life ? with deep voices ? and it's just a unique, bizarre act. I've seen a lot of comics and it takes a lot to make me laugh really hard.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2011 | By Deborah Vankin, Los Angeles Times
"Matt Braunger. You know what I like about him? And here's a sign that I'm 43 years old. First off, he really makes me laugh. But also, I can watch him with my daughter. My 10-year-old daughter really likes him too. And in a smart way, she gets it. And he's not, like, filthy dirty. He's very likeable and fun, and yet it's smart at the same time. You know where I've seen Matt Braunger? I literally go on YouTube and I get all his videos, and we sit and watch him. I've never seen him live.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2008
Garry Trudeau is taking an extended vacation, which means "Doonesbury" will be on a break now through June 16. In its place, the daily Calendar section will sample three new comics for one month each. First is "Cafe con Leche" by Charlos Gary, which will run through April 19. The Sunday comics will run repeats of "Doonesbury" comics until Trudeau's return in June. Send comments to comics@latimes .com.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014 | By Robert Abele
Out to prove that the comic-book movie needn't be mega-financed behemoths, the scrappy superhero-noir indie "Sparks" busks its 1940s saga of dark redemption with considerable visual energy, if not always coherence or competence. Starting with wounded, wanted vigilante Ian Sparks (Chase Williamson) barging into a newspaper to report his own murder, the movie flashbacks - and flashbacks - to unravel a convoluted story stemming from a superpower-bestowing meteorite crash, Sparks' teaming with masked crime fighter Heavenly Lady (Ashley Bell)
NEWS
February 26, 2014 | By Amy Hubbard
Piotr Michael has created what he's calling a PSA for Oscar nominees, advising them on award-acceptance behavior. His recommendations: Don't cry. Have some humility. Thank those who worked on the movie -- not "your neighbor, your garbage man, little Fido. " The video's gaining steam on YouTube and is worth watching. Or, better yet, listen to it with your eyes closed. Michael's a gifted voice artist and this video brings you Maggie Smith ("Thank the crew, for God's sake!") as well as Charlie Sheen, Ian McKellen ("Don't start sobbing!
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2014 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Sid Caesar, who died Wednesday at the age of 91, had a career that spanned stage and screen, but it was on TV that he was best known. His first TV appearance was on Milton Berle's "Texaco Star Theater," but it was on the variety show program "Your Show of Shows" that he became famous. The show, which aired on NBC beginning in 1950, showcased Caesar's talents alongside other future comedy legends, including Carl Reiner, Imogene Coca and Howie Morris. Mel Brooks and Neil Simon were writers for the show, which grew from the vaudeville tradition.
OPINION
February 5, 2014 | Patt Morrison
When you've been working since you were 8, as Alyssa Milano has, it takes a special kind of role to get you really excited. Using your birthday to raise money for clean water in Ethiopia, for instance. Or hunkering down with the beleaguered in Kosovo and Angola, as a UNICEF goodwill ambassador. Or getting help for African women and children with AIDS. Or her latest - creating "Hacktivist," a four-issue graphic novel/comic book whose heroes run a world-beating social media company by day and practice world-beating social activism by night.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 2014 | By Steve Chawkins
When Morrie Turner was just a cartoon-doodling kid in Oakland, he wrote a fan letter to the creator of the popular comic strip "Terry and the Pirates. " In return, Milton Caniff, who later created "Steve Canyon," sent young Turner a typed, six-page personal reply with pointers on story lines and drawing. "It changed my whole life," Turner told the San Francisco Chronicle in 2005. "The fact that he took the time to share all that with a kid, a stranger, didn't impress me all that much at the time.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2014 | By Wendy Smith
Magdalena Zyzak's delightful first novel, "The Ballad of Barnabas Pierkiel," has no noble characters, a good deal of mean-spirited behavior, and it all ends badly - in other words, it's a comedy. For those who think that religious fanaticism, racial hatred and Nazis are not fit subjects for humor, Zyzak mounts a spirited defense. "Prejudices and stupidities … in any time, in any people, serve as worthy targets for a bit of mockery," she writes. "This may be considered, in its modest way, a document of protest, as lightheartedness has become rather rare in this part of the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1995
I took my 11-year-old grandson (at his request) to see "Ace Ventura: Pet Detective." During the first few minutes, the F-word was said numerous times. I was ready to leave at that point. As I reached for my coat, Jim Carrey approached a secretary and pulled down his pants, effectively mooning the seated woman. I pulled my grandson up for a hasty exit. Gene Seymour's article "Silliness Is No Joke" (Jan. 20) did the great comics a great injustice by comparing them to Carrey. Their names should not even be put on the same page!
BUSINESS
January 8, 2014 | By Lauren Beale
Comedian Chris Kattan has listed his home in Hollywood Hills West for sale at $1.998 million, The Times has confirmed. Kattan is not the first celebrity to occupy the house, which sits behind an iron gate amid mature trees. Comic actor Danny DeVito is among the former owners. Built in 1924, the traditional-style house retains such vintage details as a Batchelder tile fireplace. The art tile fireplace surrounds became popular in the 1920s and are still prized today. The 2,496 square feet of living space includes a den, a media room, an office, two bedrooms and four bathrooms.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2014 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Jon McNaught's “Dockwood” (Nobrow Press: unpaged, $19.95) is one of those books you could easily overlook. Gathering two short stories in comics form, it came out in England a year ago, but although McNaught won the Prix Révélation (for best newcomer) at the 2013 Angouleme International Comics Festival - an award previously won by Daniel Clowes , Art Spiegelman and Will Eisner - he's gotten no attention in the United States. Partly, that has to do with the British comics scene, which has had its issues crossing over, and partly with McNaught's publisher, which until recently was not particularly active here.
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