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OPINION
March 24, 2012
Last week, The Times moved Garry Trudeau's " Doonesbury " strip from the comics page, where it usually resides, to the Op-Ed page, where it ran for six days. The reason, according to Assistant Managing Editor Alice Short, was that its story line about Texas' new law requiring women to undergo a transvaginal ultrasound before receiving an abortion was "a little bit over the top for the comics page" and more appropriately the subject of the opinion pages. This week, as "Doonesbury" returned to the comics page, other strips on that page dealt with serious and controversial political issues and no move was made to reroute them to Op-Ed.
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OPINION
June 11, 2011 | Patt Morrison
My comic book tastes ran to Classics Illustrated. Seriously, what's scarier than the graphic images of "Crime and Punishment" and Raskolnikov -- the existential "superman," not the caped one -- whacking the pawnbroker with an ax? Can I, then, hold my own with Spider-Man's spiritual father, Stan Lee, a genius of comics for 70 years? The progenitor of scores of graphic heroes and villains, "starred" on the Hollywood Walk of Fame this year, he's huge at the summer box office, with "Thor," then "X-Men: First Class" and, due out in July, "Captain America: The First Avenger.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2004
This week, Calendar introduces redesigned Comics Plus pages. No comics have been eliminated. They're reorganized so that comics that share similar readers are grouped together. As part of the changes, the Crossword Puzzle, Bridge, Astrology and Liz Smith now appear on the first Comics Plus page.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2012 | By Joyce Man, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Hong Kong - Times were good in the 1970s and '80s for Hong Kong comics - so good that one publisher was listed on the stock exchange and a newspaper dedicated to the genre published daily for two years. They were, in the words of Tony Wong, the creator of the Oriental Heroes action series whom fans, artists and scholars have dubbed the territory's godfather of comics, "the golden years. " In recent years, comics publishers here in one of the world's largest markets for the genre have slimmed down.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 2011 | Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Bill Blackbeard, an early scholar of newspaper comics who created an indispensable archive in San Francisco that helped legitimize the study of comics in popular culture, has died. He was 84. Blackbeard died at a Country Villa nursing home in Watsonville, Calif. His March 10 death, confirmed by Social Security records became public only in late April when news of it circulated on websites devoted to comics. "It's not an understatement to say that the entire movement of looking at comics as American history and culture would be fundamentally different without Bill and his contributions," said Andrew Farago of the Cartoon Art Museum of San Francisco.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2012 | By Geoff Boucher, Los Angeles Times
Jean Giraud, an enduring figure in European comics whose fantasy and sci-fi work — which he signed with his alias, Moebius — deeply influenced alien-world imagery throughout pop culture, has died. He was 73. Giraud died Friday night or Saturday morning after a battle with cancer, according to a statement from his publishing house, Dargaud, which went on to say the comics world had lost "one of its greatest masters. " In his native France, where for decades comics have attracted an older readership, Giraud is considered his country's most important figure in cartooning.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2010 | By Ben Schwartz, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In the early 1980s, comics were as much a part of Los Angeles alternative culture scene as independent film and punk rock. That's gone now, but here, comics historian Ben Schwartz takes a look back. None of them knew each other. They saw one another's comics in 'zines, weeklies and punk newspapers. "Yeah, there were a number of us," remembers Matt Groening, 30 years after his strip "Life in Hell" debuted in the Los Angeles Reader. "I don't think we even considered it a 'scene.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2006
July 30, 1938: An overflow crowd of 30,000 came out to see the leading men take on the comedians in the annual motion picture charity baseball game at Wrigley Field in South Los Angeles. Mary Pickford threw out the first ball, caught by "the great Indian athlete of yesteryear," Jim Thorpe, The Times reported. Dick Powell was captain of the leading men. Buster Keaton was "cavorting around the infield" for the comedians.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2004
John BALZAR'S story on the declining ranks of the editorial cartoonist ("Biting the Bullet," Aug. 24) misses the mark. While Balzar touches on "panel" cartoons being political, he ignores the growing political nature of many so-called "gag" cartoons. The L.A. Times carries at least six daily strips that have political or controversial social topics at least 50% of the time ("Prickly City," "Non Sequitur," "Mallard Fillmore," "Boondocks," "La Cucaracha" and "Doonesbury"). Political debate is still being encouraged by cartoon art; the setting has changed.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1988
Robin Williams was so hilarious on a recent "Tonight Show" that he literally knocked Johnny Carson out of his chair. Yet ex-weatherman David Letterman was unable to open his mouth--froze, when he guested on "the boss' " show not too long ago. There are so many genuinely funny comics who don't rely on gimmicks for laughs, simply ad lib: Jay Leno, Richard Pryor, Robert Klein, Elayne Boosler, Bill Cosby, Buddy Hackett, Arsenio Hall, Don Rickles,...
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