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OPINION
December 17, 2001
There he goes again (Michael Ramirez's cartoon, Commentary, Dec. 13). The Times' official radical-right cartoonist reasserts his partisanship in the depiction of Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle (D-S.D.) asking someone on the phone to relay his thanks to Bin Laden that he can spend money. The low insult to Daschle and the dishonesty of the characterization of his providing for unemployed workers while ignoring Republican attempts to make mammoth giveaways to multinational corporations is appalling.
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NEWS
April 3, 2014 | By Paul Thornton
Former NFL quarterback Boomer Esiason's evident dismay over New York Mets infielder Daniel Murphy's audacious decision to take a few days off early in the season to spend time with his wife and newborn child is yet more proof that pro sports today is as much about eye-rolling "color" commentary as it is the brief spurts of athleticism on the field. Baseball games are only a few hours long, leaving hours upon hours of airtime available for paid talkers to produce cringe-worthy commentary.
OPINION
November 13, 2012 | By Jonah Goldberg
The conservative Gotterdammerung is finally here. "Like dazed survivors in a ravaged city, America's conservatives are wailing and beating their collective breasts," opines the Economist's "Lexington" columnist. "A leading conservative thinker," asked by the Economist to "list today's conservative ideas, laughs bitterly and replies, 'Are there any?'" Former Reaganite Rep. Vin Weber (R-Minn.) laments in the conservative journal Policy Review, "I have never been so concerned about the future of conservative ideas.
OPINION
January 3, 2010
Not everything's changed in the decade since chads got hung up, the Y2K bug was exterminated and the dot-com bubble burst. Americans were plainly upset at flight delays, even before shoeless shakedowns and 3-oz. liquid limits. Mobile phones and automobiles were a distractive destructive mix, evn b4 txtng. And we killed plenty of time navigating the insurance racket, even before "death panels." Speaking of death panels, it was a tough 10 years for editorial cartoonists. Dozens of newspapers killed the position, including all three credited above.
OPINION
December 19, 2009 | Tim Rutten
This era is like no other in American journalism: People are consuming more news than ever before, but they're also far more critical of its purveyors than they've ever been. We remain generally agreed that a free press is democracy's cornerstone, but there's less consensus than ever on what the news media ought to be -- or, for that matter, what rapid technological, economic and demographic change will allow it to be. That makes three sets of little-noticed numbers released this week of more than passing interest.
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