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ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1986 | RANDY LEWIS
"PLAY WITH THE BOYS." Exude. Rah! Rah!/Greenworld. Exude's debut album reaffirms the commercial sensibility that the Orange County techno-pop group showed in its wily 1984 parody "Boys Just Want to Have Sex"--but with a little more depth. The title tune is a rarity in the teen-dance genre: Beneath its catchy chorus and bouncy rhythms is a plea for sexual responsibility.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2014 | By Meg James
U.S. advertising spending inched up nearly 1% last year to $140.2 billion as large companies spent more to market their products and services. Ad spending rose for cable TV, Internet display and Spanish-language media. Demand for commercials in TV sports programming also remained strong, according to a report released Tuesday by Kantar Media, which tracks ad spending. But the report uncovered a troubling economic trend. ON LOCATION: Where the cameras roll "The ad market is currently being carried by the top 1,000 advertisers who, as a group, are steadily spending more while the long tail of small-sized marketers is sharply cutting back," said Jon Swallen, chief research officer at Kantar Media North America.
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NEWS
September 20, 1992
I really enjoy the live broadcast of Fox's "Roc." I think all the actors are outstanding and I especially enjoy Charles Dutton's expression of enthusiasm and energy. It's fun to see the stage crew and prop changes at commercial time. Kathy Clark, Laguna Niguel
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2014 | By Meg James
The lighting of the Olympic flame in Russia will launch a nearly $900-million bet by U.S. advertisers that this year's Winter Games will become a feel-good event for television audiences. Leading up to Friday's official opening of the XXII Olympic Winter Games, most of the attention has centered on difficulties - and not the athletes. The Sochi athletic competitions will be unfolding against a backdrop of threats of terrorist attacks, allegations of corruption, tense U.S.-Russia relations and protests over Russia's controversial anti-gay laws.
SPORTS
May 9, 1987
I am watching an NBA playoff game. It's commercial time and an NBA player comes on and says don't do drugs. Next is a message which says don't drink and drive. Then comes four commercials pushing beer, a mind-altering drug. Is this not a double standard, or is the whole world just going crazy? STEVE URBANOVICH Burbank
NEWS
January 28, 1987
Chrysler Motors Corp., which was to have been one of the biggest commercial sponsors of ABC's "Amerika" miniseries next month, said it has pulled its ads off the program after reviewing part of it. The company said it found the six hours of the 14 1/2-hour program that it had been allowed to review "so intense and emotional" that it would be inappropriate for the company's "upbeat product commercials."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2005 | From Associated Press
CBS' "60 Minutes" has sold all of its advertising time on Sunday's show to Philips, which the network said would allow the newsmagazine's stories to run longer. The electronics company will use half of the show's normal commercial time. As a result, the first two stories of the week will run uninterrupted. It's the first time this has happened since the newsmagazine began in 1968, and executive producer Jeff Fager said he hoped it would become more common.
SPORTS
February 25, 2006
Sunday's Daytona 500 broadcast on NBC was a tremendous disappointment. I bet that a review of the tape would show that the commercial time exceeded the coverage of actual racing. They would show two laps and go to another commercial. They always left the race with a promise that they would return if there was a crash. I would like to see them come back for a brilliant pass or block. Even when they were showing the race, the announcer was reading a plug for their Olympic coverage or some other sponsor.
BUSINESS
August 5, 1987 | PAUL RICHTER, Times Staff Writer
When business is too good, business can be hurt, the sales staff at the ABC Television Network learned to its mild embarrassment last month. They were thrilled, of course, by the unexpected strength of demand when they began selling commercials for the television season that begins in September. But as they booked advance sales during the habitually frenzied "upfront" negotiations with advertisers, they lost track of how much of their inventory they were selling.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1987 | DAVID CROOK, Times Staff Writer
A San Francisco television station will begin airing commercials for prophylactics within two weeks and contribute revenues from the controversial ads to AIDS research, officials of NBC-affiliated KRON-TV said Friday. The station's move is believed to be a first among TV broadcasters serving major cities.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2013 | By Meg James
This post has been updated. See below for details. CBS Corp. Chief Executive Leslie Moonves sold 450,000 shares of CBS stock this week for about $22 million, according to a regulatory filing. The television titan, whose compensation package last year topped $62 million , acquired the stock as part of his long-term incentive program. The sales, which were part of a regular schedule of sales to avoid the appearance of market timing, occurred on Monday and Tuesday, according to the filing.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2013 | By Meg James
U.S. advertising spending during the first quarter of 2013 was flat compared to the year-earlier period, reflecting television network ratings woes and caution amid mixed signals on the economy. Marketers during the January-March period spent $30.2 billion, according to a quarterly advertising analysis released Tuesday by Kantar Media. That represented a decline of less than 1% compared to the first quarter of 2012. Spending was surpressed, in large part, because the major broadcast TV networks, including Fox, NBC and ABC, were suffering from falling ratings.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2013 | By Meg James
The small CW television network has wrapped up its upfront advertising sales, becoming the first broadcast network to pass the finish line in the TV industry's annual auction. Fox last week kicked off the broadcast ad bazaar, haggling with advertisers over the sale of their commercial time for the upcoming 2013-2014 TV season. Fox, owned by News Corp., has been negotiating rate increases of between 5% to 7%, according to knowledgeable people who asked not to be identified discussing sensitive financial information.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2013 | By Meg James, Los Angeles Times
For this year's Super Bowl, more marketers are benching the standard 30-second spots and paying pricey sums - in some cases more than $7.5 million - to run 60-second commercials during the NFL championship Feb. 3. Longer commercials are part of a game plan to win the attention and the affection of viewers, including the tens of millions of people who watch the Super Bowl primarily to see the ads. A Harris Interactive study last year found that...
BUSINESS
October 29, 2012 | By Joe Flint, Los Angeles Times
One of the most popular new shows of the fall television season is NBC's "Revolution," a drama about post-apocalyptic America. But the real revolution is how people are watching it. About 9.2 million viewers tuned in to a recent episode, a so-so performance. But that number jumped by nearly 5 million when the Nielsen ratings service added in the people who recorded the show and watched it later or saw it through video on demand or online. Full coverage: Television reviews "Revolution" isn't the only show whose popularity can no longer be measured solely by traditional TV ratings.
BUSINESS
May 25, 2012 | By Meg James and Joe Flint, Los Angeles Times
Fox Broadcasting, NBCUniversal and CBS Corp. have sued Dish Network to try to sink the satellite company's controversial new ad-skipping feature AutoHop, which makes it possible for subscribers to automatically remove commercials in broadcast TV shows. Dish fired back with its own lawsuit, asking a federal judge to declare that AutoHop violates no laws. Dish sued Fox, NBC, CBS and ABC, which is expected to join the other broadcast networks in the effort against the satellite TV company.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2009 | Scott Collins
The television business may be rediscovering that there are Americans who matter who aren't ages 18 to 49. For the last 20 years, the television industry has been all about young-adult demographic groups, or "demos" in the slang of Madison Avenue, because marketers have believed that young people are most likely to develop lifelong loyalties to certain brands. Thus, whichever network attracts the most adults under 50 has been considered the winner, commanding premium rates for commercial time.
BUSINESS
May 16, 2008 | Meg James, Times Staff Writer
Here's a first. Fox wants to sell fewer ads. Yes, fewer. The first-place broadcast network, in a move aimed at quelling viewer backlash against the rising number of ads shoehorned into TV shows, told advertisers Thursday that it would slash by half the number of commercials next season for two of its most promising new dramas: "Fringe" produced by J.J. Abrams, and "Dollhouse," created by Joss Whedon.
BUSINESS
June 18, 2011 | By Meg James, Los Angeles Times
Boasting popular sporting events and original entertainment shows, cable programmers long ago surpassed the broadcast networks in viewers. Now they are beginning to close the advertising-revenue divide. "For the first time, the cable upfront take will be greater than the broadcast upfront," Bill Koenigsberg, chief executive of Horizon Media, said this week at the National Cable & Telecommunications Assn. convention in Chicago. This year, many top cable channels, including Time Warner's Turner networks, have been able to raise their ad rates more than 10% in the so-called upfront market, the period when advertisers commit to buying the bulk of the commercial time for the upcoming TV season.
BUSINESS
October 14, 2010 | By Meg James, Los Angeles Time
Google Inc.'s ambitions to broaden its advertising reach beyond the Internet have been dealt a blow by the loss of its marquee media partner ? NBC Universal. NBC said Wednesday that it had stopped providing unsold commercial time from several of its cable channels to Google. Two years ago, Google's efforts to ramp up its television ad sales brokerage system received a substantial boost when NBC Universal became the first major TV programmer to sign on. NBC had been contributing time from its Syfy, Oxygen, MSNBC, Sleuth and Chiller channels.
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