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Commercial Whaling

OPINION
June 25, 1989
The Times reported the shocking discovery of a blue whale population so small (200 to 450) that the species may no longer be able to survive (Part I, June 13). The blue whale is the largest animal ever to have lived on earth--larger, even, than the dinosaurs--and their demise will be directly attributable to whaling. Before commercial whaling began, there were 250,000 blue whales. Hurray for mankind! The report came out at a meeting of the International Whaling Commission in San Diego.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1989
Two alarming developments emerged from the International Whaling Commission meeting in San Diego: --The stock of whales is lower that the grim earlier assessments had predicted, and --Japan is continuing its defiance of the recommendations of the commission's scientific committee with plans for an even larger kill of minke whales in the Antarctic under the scientific- research exemption to the whaling moratorium. Furthermore, the meeting was marked by new estimates of the appalling kill of other sea mammals that suggest an urgent need for the commission to extend its work to dolphins and porpoises.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1989 | JANE FRITSCH, Times Staff Writer
Capping a week of defeats for Japan, the International Whaling Commission on Friday turned down a request that whalers in four Japanese coastal villages be allowed to kill 320 whales in the coming year. The action came on the final day of the commission's annual meeting and prompted a strongly-worded protest from Japan, which has opposed the international moratorium on commercial whaling since it was approved by the commission in 1982 and took effect in 1986. "A lot of suffering is being created under this moratorium decision by the commission," said Kazuo Shima, the Japanese delegate.
NEWS
June 17, 1989 | JANE FRITSCH, Times Staff Writer
Capping a week of defeats for Japan, the International Whaling Commission on Friday turned down a request that whalers in four Japanese coastal villages be allowed to kill 320 whales in the coming year. The action came on the final day of the commission's annual meeting and prompted a strongly worded protest from Japan, which has opposed the international moratorium on commercial whaling since it was approved by the commission in 1982 and took effect in 1986. "A lot of suffering is being created under this moratorium decision by the commission," said Kazuo Shima, the Japanese delegate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1989 | JANE FRITSCH, Times Staff Writer
The International Whaling Commission's scientific committee released a grim report Monday in San Diego, indicating that the populations of some whale species are much smaller than previously thought. The most seriously depleted is the blue whale, the Earth's largest animal, whose number is estimated at 453, but could be as low as 200. Before the advent of widespread commercial whaling, there were an estimated 250,000 blue whales in Antarctic waters. Recent estimates had put their numbers at 6,000 to 11,000.
NEWS
June 13, 1989 | JANE FRITSCH, Times Staff Writer
The International Whaling Commission's scientific committee released a grim report Monday indicating that the populations of some whale species are much smaller than previously thought. The most seriously depleted is the blue whale, the Earth's largest animal, whose number is estimated at 453, but could be as low as 200. Before the advent of widespread commercial whaling, there were an estimated 250,000 blue whales in Antarctic waters. Recent estimates had put their numbers at 6,000 to 11,000.
NEWS
June 11, 1989 | JANE FRITSCH, Times Staff Writer
When delegates to the International Whaling Commission assemble in San Diego this week, they will grapple with the perennial opposition of Japan and several other countries to the worldwide ban on commercial whaling. But a new issue is expected to emerge at the commission's annual meeting, which is being held in the United States for the first time since 1971. Members of Greenpeace, Earth Island Institute and other animal protection groups want the commission to take on the tuna fishing industry for killing thousands of dolphins each year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1989 | JANE FRITSCH, Times Staff Writer
When delegates to the International Whaling Commission assemble in San Diego this week, they will grapple with the perennial opposition of Japan and several other countries to the worldwide ban on commercial whaling. But a new issue is expected to emerge at the commission's annual meeting, which is being held in the United States for the first time since 1971. Members of Greenpeace, Earth Island Institute and other animal protection groups want the commission to take on the tuna-fishing industry for each year killing thousands of dolphins, which die when they become ensnared in the fishermen's nets.
NEWS
March 16, 1989 | From Times wire services
Japan's research whaling program is too small to be scientifically accurate, so more whales should be killed next year, the head of the program said today. Fukuzo Nagasaki, director of the semi-governmental Institute of Cetacean Research, said the 300 whales being caught by Japanese ships in the Antarctic this year are not enough to make an accurate assessment of whale stocks and should be increased to 825 next season.
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