YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCommercials


December 14, 2009 | By Richard Simon
Rep. Anna G. Eshoo (D-Menlo Park) wanted advertisers to hear her loud and clear. So she introduced the Commercial Advertisement Loudness Mitigation -- or CALM -- Act, aimed at lowering the volume on televised sales pitches. "In my 17 years in the House of Representatives, I've never carried a bill which has been received with so much enthusiasm," Eshoo said. "Only the do-not-call list has even come close." Rep. Rick Boucher (D-Va.), chairman of the House telecommunications subcommittee, who supports the legislation, said, "All of us have had the experience of enjoying a favorite program only to find ourselves scrambling to locate the remote control when, at the commercial break, the volume of the television seemingly doubles."
July 12, 1992
Watching a Dodger game on television is supposed to be a family treat. Yet the games televised on KTTV are loaded with commercials for Fox's most violent offerings. Thus, on June 19 there was a commercial for "America's Most Wanted," featuring one father who raped his daughter and another who murdered his son. Seven minutes after that there was an ad for "Code 3," showing a man being kicked and beaten by a mob. Eight minutes after that, the fathers were back. If there are no limits to what this network and station will do for greed, it is up to the Dodgers to insist on standards.
October 25, 1999
It's obvious that, while Melody Suppes loves foreign movies, she's unfamiliar with foreign culture ("For Love of Movies, Stop Commercials," Oct. 18). Commercials have been a staple in French and British cinema for years. They do have intermissions (at least in Italy). And because production (and creative) values are held to a higher standard than on TV, audiences find them entertaining. Given a choice, I certainly would rather sit through Super Bowl-quality commercials made by budding filmmakers than the monotonous, repetitious drivel of the L.A. Times' "Get the Story" (sorry, guys)
July 19, 1992
Is there any way on this green planet that we, the viewers, can beg, cajole, threaten or plead the television stations to stop cutting movies and series just so they can squeeze in a commercial, obnoxious or otherwise? I can't watch "MASH" anymore because KFMB-Channel 8 has cut it so badly that there is only a skeleton of a series left. I know because I have seen the originals ... and they are butchered now. S.L. Zuckerman, Fallbrook
November 8, 2012 | By Dan Loumena
Danica Patrick, a month removed from speculation that she might lose her starring role with , will star in two more spots for the Internet domain provider during the 2013 Super Bowl. With turning over production of the commercials to Deutsch Inc., many began to wonder if Patrick was on her way out as GoDaddy's pitch person. founder and chief executive Bob Parsons announced Thursday that Patrick will be in both commercials to air during the Super Bowl on Feb. 3. "I definitely thought there was a chance I wouldn't be in them," Patrick said.
May 31, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
SAG-AFTRA members overwhelmingly approved new contracts covering work in commercials. The new three-year contracts, which cover performers working in commercials for television, radio, the Internet and new media, were approved by a 96% margin, the union said in a statement Friday night. The contracts, which take effect immediately and will be retroactive to April 1, will result in wage increases and other payments totaling $238 million for all categories of performers, improvements in cable use fees, increases in payments for work on the Internet and new media platforms and higher contributions to the union's health and pension/retirement plans.
February 4, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
It's not good enough to simply air a commercial during the Super Bowl anymore; companies aim to start Internet buzz. Networked Insights, a marketing analytics company, analyzed viewer conversations across the social Web during Sunday's Super Bowl XLVII to discover what people thought about the ads and celebrities. The New York firm found that more than 24 million real-time social media conversations took place about the game across Twitter, Facebook, blogs and forums for the duration of the game.
May 8, 2012 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski, Los Angeles Times
Build-a-Bear Workshop was introducing a line of stuffed animals called smallfrys and wanted to reach moms through Facebook. One video used in the online promotion showed a woman pulling up to a fast-food window. Her young daughter requests "a smallfry. " When her mom suggests a fruit cup or celery sticks, the daughter says, "Mom, order me a curly-haired bunny in a purple sequined bathing suit. " The 45-second smallfrys spot came not from a traditional advertising agency but from Poptent Inc., a "crowdsourced" video production studio that has built a global community of 50,000 writers, directors, cinematographers and animators to create commercials for Build-a-Bear, American Airlines, Dell, Intel, Jaguar, General Mills and others.
September 23, 2013 | By Steve Dilbeck
It may feel like ESPN wants to own the entire sports universe - OK, it does - but however you feel about the mega-conglomerate, they have made some clever commercials over the years. Now they've managed to produce one that's both self-serving and clever, which, when you think about it, is right up their alley. They have a new spot that plays off the ESPN - - what? -- theme music. I hesitate to call it that, because it's only a few notes, though they have become ingrained in the American sporting public's consciousness.
Los Angeles Times Articles