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NEWS
July 19, 1992 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid a chorus of ominous warnings and bitter denunciations from national leaders, volunteers in a tiny office only a few hundred yards from the scars of the old Berlin Wall are working on a potentially explosive idea: a new regional political movement for eastern Germany.
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NEWS
July 19, 1992 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid a chorus of ominous warnings and bitter denunciations from national leaders, volunteers in a tiny office only a few hundred yards from the scars of the old Berlin Wall are working on a potentially explosive idea: a new regional political movement for eastern Germany.
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NEWS
April 20, 2005
Judicial filibusters -- A commentary Friday on the congressional stalemate on judicial nominees incorrectly attributed a memo to Clint Bollick. It was C. Boyden Gray, chairman of the Committee for Justice, who made the comments in favor of abolishing filibusters over judicial nominees.
NATIONAL
April 29, 2005 | Maura Reynolds and Johanna Neuman, Times Staff Writers
Amid the battle over filibusters in the U.S. Senate, a side skirmish has broken out over the most iconic, if fictional, filibuster of them all: Jimmy Stewart's last stand in the 1939 film "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington."
OPINION
September 30, 2006
Re "How much of an umpire is the chief justice?" Current, Sept. 24 David Savage wrongly concludes that Supreme Court Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. has strayed from the modest judicial role envisioned by Roberts' analogy of judges as umpires. That analogy contrasted Roberts' judicial philosophy, based on objective interpretation of the law, with judicial activism, in which judges shape the law to fit their own policy preferences. A judge-as-umpire is duty-bound to strike down statutes that violate the Constitution or distort laws.
NEWS
March 12, 1988 | Associated Press
Seventy members of the Israeli Parliament on Friday presented a petition calling on President Reagan to pardon Jonathan Jay Pollard, the Navy analyst who was convicted of passing secrets to Israel. The petition, presented to U.S. Ambassador Thomas R. Pickering, was signed by most of the right-wing Likud bloc in the Knesset, or Parliament, and by the left-wing Mapam faction of the Labor Alignment. It was a rare display of unity among Israel's divided legislators.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 2001 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two years after Torrance resident Myung-Sub "Mike" Lee took his own life, his widow has reached a settlement of her lawsuit that claimed her Korean-born husband's suicide was the result of discrimination by his Japanese bosses. Attorneys for Junko Lee and Nippon Express USA, a worldwide shipping firm, said the two sides have "resolved to the satisfaction of all parties involved" the widow's federal court lawsuit.
NEWS
January 13, 1992 | HOWARD BLUME, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Activists added 20,000 signatures of support Sunday to efforts to send to jail a Korean-born grocer convicted of killing a Los Angeles teen-ager. The support was in the form of almost 20,000 signature cards displayed Sunday at the First African Methodist Episcopal Church in Los Angeles and gathered throughout the city by the Committee for Justice, a group of 20 volunteers.
OPINION
October 14, 2005 | JONATHAN CHAIT
ONE OF THE MANY lessons conservatives seem to be learning from the Harriet E. Miers imbroglio is that it's no fun to be on the receiving end of a vicious smear from the Bush administration. Last week, Ed Gillespie -- the former Republican National Committee chairman designated by Bush to flack for his nominee -- told a group of conservative activists that the criticism of Miers had a "whiff of sexism." And then, to show it's no fluke, Laura Bush repeated the sexism charge this week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1999
Cardinal Roger M. Mahony, who in 1991 fought efforts by archdiocesan cemetery workers to unionize, has told national labor leaders and a worker justice committee that both the church and labor must do more to live up to their highest ideals. "While our church has sought to stand with workers, our record is not pure. Neither is the labor movement's," Mahony told the National Interfaith Committee for Worker Justice meeting recently in Los Angeles.
BOOKS
June 23, 1996 | Ruth Coughlin, Former Detroit News book editor Ruth Coughlin is also the author of "Grieving: A Love Story."
To say that Brian Moore's 18th novel is a thriller would be getting it only half right. To be sure, it is a story of the hunter and the hunted, with a plot as tautly pulled as piano wire. And yes, in the vernacular that currently describes contemporary fiction, "The Statement" is, in fact, a page-turner--a book you're guaranteed to read in one great gulp, fully satisfied by its spectacular and surprising conclusion.
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