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NEWS
July 22, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
So, was that one small carry-on for a pope, one giant leap for Roman Catholics? Heading off Monday f or his first overseas trip , Pope Francis demonstrated the common touch we heard so much about when he was elected pontiff: He waited in line to board, just like the other passengers, and he toted his own luggage up the ramp, just like (too many of) the other passengers. And, like a lot of us modern folks, Francis had to get in some last-minute social networking before all those electronic devices had to be turned off, tweeting to his followers his excitement about heading off to Brazil to take part in World Youth Day. SLIDE SHOW: Pope Francis' small steps to lift liberals' hearts Unfortunately, there was no word in The Times' story on whether the pontiff bashed anyone in the knee/elbow/head while negotiating the too-narrow aisle of the modern jetliner to get to his seat and stow his carry-on bag. Nor on whether he flew first class or economy, or got a window or aisle seat.
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NEWS
July 22, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
So, was that one small carry-on for a pope, one giant leap for Roman Catholics? Heading off Monday f or his first overseas trip , Pope Francis demonstrated the common touch we heard so much about when he was elected pontiff: He waited in line to board, just like the other passengers, and he toted his own luggage up the ramp, just like (too many of) the other passengers. And, like a lot of us modern folks, Francis had to get in some last-minute social networking before all those electronic devices had to be turned off, tweeting to his followers his excitement about heading off to Brazil to take part in World Youth Day. SLIDE SHOW: Pope Francis' small steps to lift liberals' hearts Unfortunately, there was no word in The Times' story on whether the pontiff bashed anyone in the knee/elbow/head while negotiating the too-narrow aisle of the modern jetliner to get to his seat and stow his carry-on bag. Nor on whether he flew first class or economy, or got a window or aisle seat.
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BUSINESS
June 15, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
The Cheesecake Factory is at once an ostentatious den of dining and decorative excess as well as a homespun throwback to family tradition. Witness the florid murals and French-inspired checked floors, the dozens of cheesecakes in sumptuous flavors such as white chocolate caramel macadamia and the calorie-laden dishes that regularly land the chain on extreme eating lists. But behind the extravagant menu and interior design, there's a classically American story involving an entrepreneurial housewife and a cheesecake tweaked from a newspaper recipe.
BUSINESS
June 15, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
The Cheesecake Factory is at once an ostentatious den of dining and decorative excess as well as a homespun throwback to family tradition. Witness the florid murals and French-inspired checked floors, the dozens of cheesecakes in sumptuous flavors such as white chocolate caramel macadamia and the calorie-laden dishes that regularly land the chain on extreme eating lists. But behind the extravagant menu and interior design, there's a classically American story involving an entrepreneurial housewife and a cheesecake tweaked from a newspaper recipe.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2002
The hard-luck guys in Matthew Klein's new comedy "The Common Man" need cash and a reason to get out of bed each morning. Success on these fronts might give them something they need still more: self-respect. So when a moneymaking scheme comes along, they sign on, even though it means doing a little job for the mob. The resulting mayhem leaves them holding the bag--two, actually, both full of rotting parrot carcasses--in a funny, frenetic staging at the Met Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1988 | HOLLY GLEASON
It is no wonder that country music in the '80s is plagued with image problems, given the sort of Conan-macho attitude and leering stage demeanor demonstrated by Bobby Bare at the Crazy Horse in Santa Ana Monday night. Anyone who can make jokes about incest, make repeated references to women's breasts and underarm hair, and who would sing a supposed lament about a cowpoke who has sex with cattle, hardly qualifies as an adult, let alone a performer of any value.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1986 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
Kihachi Okamoto's "Tokkan" and "The Human Bullet" (at the Nuart Sunday through next Saturday) view chaotic historic events from the point of view of the powerless ordinary man and are dazzling revisionist satires from the director of such frequently revived samurai movies as "Sword of Doom" and "Samurai Assassin."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1987 | STEVE GEISSINGER, Associated Press
A tobacco-chewing millionaire in khaki work clothes says he is going to make nothing less than the "Eighth Wonder of the World" rise from wind-swept hills near San Francisco. Some folks like the idea, others don't. A few think he is crazy. But it seems they are all taking him seriously.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2003 | Robert Hilburn, Times Staff Writer
Because Johnny Cash had been in and out of the hospital with such regularity in recent years, we all should have been ready for the news of his death Friday morning. Still, it hit hard. This voice of the American experience for a half-century seemed as indestructible as a national monument. He certainly was a national treasure who set a standard of excellence in pop music.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1991 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's appropriate that John Conlee performs at the Crazy Horse Steak House when he tours. Not only is he a solid country performer, but he's also got a voice that's a lot like a steak--big, basic and, of course, beefy. The stocky singer serves his songs up unadorned by finesse or variation. He has a limited range and does little to set one tune apart form another with changes in dynamics or inflection. But who wants to mess up a good steak with anything fancy?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2012 | By Liesl Bradner, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Before the era of the 24-hour news cycle and weekly televised debates, the predominant and most creative outlet for presidential candidates to communicate their vision was the campaign poster. With "Presidential Campaign Posters" (Quirk Books), the Library of Congress takes a look back at two centuries of memorable election art. The book begins with the 1828 Andrew Jackson / John Quincy Adams race, spanning through 2008's Barack Obama / John McCain battle - including Shepard Fairey's memorable Obama "Hope" poster - and covering every campaign in between.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2009 | JAMES RAINEY
Los Angeles writer Amy Wallace knew there would be blow back when she wrote a story for Wired magazine debunking the idea that autism is caused by childhood vaccinations. But she didn't imagine anything like this. Two weeks after the story hit the Internet, the e-mail keeps flowing. A majority voice support for "An Epidemic of Fear: How Panicked Parents Skipping Shots Endangers Us All." But at least one in five disagrees. Many seethe with indignation. A few sling vile names and veiled threats.
OPINION
April 19, 2009 | Mark Gevisser, Mark Gevisser is writer in residence at the University of Pretoria and the author of "A Legacy of Liberation: Thabo Mbeki and the Future of the South African Dream."
Campaigning in his KwaZulu-Natal heartland last week, Jacob Zuma took aim at one of his sharpest critics, the Nobel laureate Archbishop Desmond Tutu. The cleric had "strayed" from his pastoral responsibilities by criticizing him, said Zuma, who has battled charges of fraud and racketeering for most of the last decade. "As far as I know," Zuma said, "the role of priests is to pray for the souls of sinners, not condemn them."
OPINION
October 19, 2008 | Ian Randal Strock, Ian Randal Strock is the author of "The Presidential Book of Lists," which will be published next week. He is also the editor of SFScope and blogs about presidents at uspresidents.livejournal.com.
The 42 men who've been president of the United States share many characteristics besides membership in one of the world's most exclusive clubs. That means, looking at them as a group, we can extract an "average president." The data can't predict who'll win the election, but they can tell us how the current candidates stack up against those who've come before. 1. What's the average age at which a president is first inaugurated? a. 45 b. 50 c. 55 d. 60 -- 2. How tall is the average president? a.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2008 | Susan King
Location. Location. Location. A few years back, Hart Bochner was making a movie in Bakersfield. The production moved to the desert town of Trona for two night shoots. The experience there proved so overwhelming that he was compelled to write and direct a movie about it. "Just Add Water," which opens Friday, is set in the town on the edge of Death Valley.
OPINION
June 21, 2007
Re "The princess and the heiress," Opinion, June 16 What Meghan Daum fails to acknowledge in her comparison of Princess Diana and Paris Hilton are Diana's connections with the common man. Even if she did it for PR purposes, Diana literally embraced people with AIDS at a time when no one else would, traveled to Africa to draw attention to poverty on that continent and made her sons ride the Tube and eat fast food so they would have an appreciation of...
NEWS
July 25, 1995 | MICHAEL P. LUCAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Patty Stephenson will always remember the last time she saw Will Rogers. She had dropped by his Pacific Palisades home, as she did frequently in those days, as the humorist and folk hero was preparing to leave for Alaska on the journey that would end in his death in a plane crash on Aug. 15, 1935. "He was really excited about that trip," she recalled. "He had been talking about it all week."
WORLD
June 15, 2006 | Hector Tobar, Times Staff Writer
The candidate has a certain sex appeal. Imagine a mestizo Bill Clinton: cappuccino-colored skin, a full head of white hair and a charismatic stage presence. Sometimes, his arrival at a campaign stop will provoke a scream from a woman who, a second later, realizes she's too old to be acting that way. Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador is the candidate of the common man (and, clearly, of the common woman) in this year's presidential campaign.
OPINION
March 24, 2007
Re "Blogs can top the presses," Column One, March 17 The Times fails to mention that not only do hundreds of readers offer research information that expands and/or validates the thread of an author's post, but they can also immediately slap it down if it's erroneous. This seems as critical as any other ingredient in the power wielded by blogs. Influential ones are nearly self-vetted. They are returning our democracy to the common man. Major media, on the other hand, are tailored to onlookers content to trust the mouthpiece alone.
WORLD
June 15, 2006 | Hector Tobar, Times Staff Writer
The candidate has a certain sex appeal. Imagine a mestizo Bill Clinton: cappuccino-colored skin, a full head of white hair and a charismatic stage presence. Sometimes, his arrival at a campaign stop will provoke a scream from a woman who, a second later, realizes she's too old to be acting that way. Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador is the candidate of the common man (and, clearly, of the common woman) in this year's presidential campaign.
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