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November 30, 1988 | HILLIARD HARPER, San Diego County Arts Writer
"I love the way he blends colors to create forms." Local LeRoy Neiman fan "Neiman's paintings require no work from viewers. Like TV, they provide a passive kind of enjoyment. They do not provide visual nourishment. Caveat emptor. These Twinkies of painting may induce visual madness."
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2012 | By Chris Barton
Boldly going where many have gone before, William Shatner is bringing his one-man Broadway show "Shatner's World" to Orange County in early 2013. The 80-year-old actor, song stylist and travel-site pitchman will bring a  mix of storytelling and songs in a performance that acts as a comic autobiography. The show, which enjoyed a monthlong run at the Music Box Theatre in New York in February, played for one night at the Pantages in March as part of a national tour. A bit of an acquired taste in self-aware turns since his days as James T. Kirk on "Star Trek," Shatner earned mixed reviews on stage.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1994
U.S. history is the history of the Americans, all of us. That simple and uncontroversial-sounding thesis has in fact something revolutionary about it. Gary B. Nash, director of the UCLA National Center for History in the Schools, is not exaggerating when he calls the just-released "National Standards for United States History" for grades 5 through 12 "nothing short of a new American revolution in history education."
WORLD
April 11, 2012 | By Jonathan Kaiman, Los Angeles Times
CHONGQING, China — Change has come quickly to this sprawling city of 30 million people since the charismatic local party chief, Bo Xilai, was fired last month by the national Communist Party leadership in China's most high-profile political shake-up in 20 years. Signs in public squares now ban gatherings to sing "red songs," a prominent element of Bo's effort to revitalize Mao-era values. Advertising has replaced propaganda messages on television. Bo's supporters say some old problems — be it the nuisance of unwanted leaflets or a bigger issue like prostitution — are creeping back.
TRAVEL
June 4, 2000
Regarding "Queen for a Day" (Weekend Escape, May 14): Now I know the Los Angeles Times has lost all touch with reality. The Hotel Bel-Air, $855 per night? How many people could afford that? Is there another travel publication aimed at common people? A couple of more changes to The Times, and I will save myself the cost of a subscription. BOB YOUNKER Lancaster
OPINION
December 2, 1990
Zealous conservatives Margaret Thatcher and Ronald Reagan are out. The anxious liberals, with their greatest obstacles and complaint removed, now have their golden opportunity to show what they can do to cure the misery of the common people. The state of the underprivileged is so bad, and their pain so severe, that even a slight move in the right direction will be a great victory. We will see what the liberals can do. ALI WASSIL Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1998
Re "Keep Politics Off the Bench," Commentary, April 19: While Terry Friedman makes a quixotic argument for the separation of the legislative and judicial branches in the public's mind, he is reaching for the unattainable ideal. Americans are passionate about certain issues, including abortion, free speech, racism, affirmative action, victims' rights, etc. When a judge issues an order that is perceived as either unjust or immoral, then the judge risks censure by the public's hands at the voting booth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1988
In his column ("Rejecting an Aristocracy of Experts," Op-Ed Page, Oct. 19), Michael Novak claims that Michael Dukakis represents the arrogant aristocracy of managerial "experts" who look down on ordinary people and tell them that they are stupid; the common people are going for George Bush because he wants to be loved as one of them and be the self-image they desire to see in their "king." Novak may be right about the way in which many people respond to the office of President, but I refuse to simply accept that American presidential politics has come to this.
OPINION
June 11, 1989
Beatty is right on target when he states that the Democratic Party "is losing its soul." For too long, Democrats have been feeding from the trough of big business in a futile attempt to keep up with the Republican Party. In a two-party system in which both parties are beholden to corporate America, who is left to speak up for the common people? The Democratic Party needs to return to its roots, and start to represent the vast majority of Americans who haven't profited from the prevalent greed, corruption and selfishness of the Reagan-Bush years.
SPORTS
October 5, 1991
The Coliseum after 1992: Say goodby to crowds of 92,000 for football. Say goodby to tickets available to the common man. Say goodby to major track meets in Los Angeles, including future Olympics. Say hello to limited high-priced seats. Say hello to exclusive seats for big-money Hollywood types--a la the Lakers. The Coliseum was built to be enjoyed by Los Angeles' common people, not so Al Davis can get his way. By the way, Al, if you wanted an intimate crowd environment, why did you leave Oakland?
NATIONAL
September 20, 2009 | Deborah L. Shelton
At 84, Juan Guano would seem an unlikely candidate for a kidney transplant. But the kidney he received was 69. Until recently, that kidney would not have been eligible for use in a transplant. But this summer, surgeons at Northwestern Memorial Hospital placed it into Guano, making him among the nation's oldest organ recipients. His surgery illustrates intersecting trends in transplant medicine: People 60 and older represent the fastest-growing age group on transplant waiting lists, and kidneys increasingly are being accepted from "expanded-criteria donors" -- older people and those who had health problems.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2009
I note in Choire Sicha's Sunday feature ("The Sunday Conversation," May 17) his statement that "Life is short; it's about having nice things now." I am amused that an interviewer would make this statement rather than a celebrity, but despite its source, the statement adequately summarizes the major problem with today's younger American generation -- the economic woes we face in this country are the result of our leaders' and the common people's inability...
OPINION
October 18, 2006
Re "Peace Prize Winner Sees Every Cent as a Seed," Oct. 14 Over the past few months, The Times has published a number of articles about microcredit and its benefits to the poor. I particularly enjoyed the article about Muhammad Yunus, who pioneered the concept of microcredit, winning the Nobel Peace Prize. However, the stories failed to mention how regular people of modest means can join Yunus in his fight against poverty. The information can be found by anyone interested in joining the fight against poverty at smallfortunes.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2005 | Anthony Day, Special to The Times
In his new book of essays on political, social and artistic aspects of modern life, Theodore Dalrymple falls upon his victims with singular ferocity, raging against modern British life in general and Labor Prime Minister Tony Blair in particular, as well as multiculturalism, the welfare state, modern art (Joan Miro and contemporary British art especially), D.H. Lawrence and Virginia Woolf. What? Mrs. Woolf a menace to civilization?
TRAVEL
October 24, 2004
John Shors' article, "An Enduring Monument to the Power of Love" [Traveler's Journal, Oct. 17], was interesting. The Taj Mahal is definitely one of the most remarkable buildings in the world. However, behind the beauty lies a painful and ugly history. It took 20,000 people more than 22 years to build this dream mausoleum, and legend has it that the masons had their hands amputated after it was completed [supposedly to ensure that the masterpiece would never have a rival]. To me it does not symbolize the power of love but rather egotistical vision at the expense of the common people.
OPINION
April 5, 2003
Anne Burley (letter, April 1) risks overstating her case when she says London's "entire East End disappeared" because of German bombing in World War II. I lived in the East End until recently, and my house had been built in 1826. Huge damage was inflicted by the Luftwaffe, but only a fraction of the housing stock was destroyed. However, there are interesting parallels between that war and this. Churchill's contingency plans for a German invasion involved the use of chemical weapons (mustard gas)
TRAVEL
October 24, 2004
John Shors' article, "An Enduring Monument to the Power of Love" [Traveler's Journal, Oct. 17], was interesting. The Taj Mahal is definitely one of the most remarkable buildings in the world. However, behind the beauty lies a painful and ugly history. It took 20,000 people more than 22 years to build this dream mausoleum, and legend has it that the masons had their hands amputated after it was completed [supposedly to ensure that the masterpiece would never have a rival]. To me it does not symbolize the power of love but rather egotistical vision at the expense of the common people.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2009
I note in Choire Sicha's Sunday feature ("The Sunday Conversation," May 17) his statement that "Life is short; it's about having nice things now." I am amused that an interviewer would make this statement rather than a celebrity, but despite its source, the statement adequately summarizes the major problem with today's younger American generation -- the economic woes we face in this country are the result of our leaders' and the common people's inability...
OPINION
March 4, 2003
Re "For Sheen, Being a Peacemaker Is Not a Role but a Calling," March 2: How sad that in times like these, many people completely lose sight of what it means to be an American. Martin Sheen is a "true American" because he is standing up for what he believes in, simple as that. Don't we value freedom of speech? Does the speech have to fall in line with the official stance on all issues? I too have been called names and told to go to Iraq as a human shield if I am against the war, and told to be a "true American" and support the war. Our founding fathers would be disgusted if they were here to hear this rhetoric.
OPINION
November 5, 2002
Re "All Alone at the Marble Altar," by Steve Lopez, Nov. 1: Thank goodness for a voice of rationality and compassion! During the Middle Ages, when the grand cathedrals of Europe were constructed with golden altars and stained-glass windows, the common people starved and died of terrible diseases in their hovels. Now we build a $189-million Rog Mahal while people lie homeless in the streets and others search for work. Significantly, Lopez is able to say what we need to hear without being considered a heretic and burned at the stake.
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