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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1998 | JOHN CANALIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Members of a Costa Mesa religious commune pleaded not guilty at Municipal Court in Newport Beach on Friday to charges that they violated city codes at their crafts store and warehouse. Judge Susanne S. Shaw denied a request from the Piecemakers, who also call themselves the Body of Christ Fellowship, to dismiss the charges. Shaw ordered them to stand trial Feb. 10.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 12, 2012 | By Karen Kaplan
Go take a hike - it's good for your brain. So says a new study that supports something called Attention Restoration Theory , which holds that exposure to nature can replenish our cognitive reserves when they are worn out by overuse. And if you live a modern urban or suburban life, your cognitive reserves are surely depleted: A typical teenager spends more than 7.5 hours per day juggling a computer, cellphone, TV and other media, and the number is surely higher for a typical adult, according to the study: “Our modern society is filled with sudden events (sirens, horns, ringing phones, alarms, televisions, etc.)
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1990 | NANCY HERNDON, THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR
It was 1967 when residents of conservative, rural Louisa County learned that some young people were starting a commune on a 400-acre farm outside town. "Most people here didn't even know what a commune was," recalled Hilda Powell, a lifelong resident and editor of the Central Virginian newspaper. Families living on the area's historic farms were as much astonished as alarmed at the prospect of abutting a radical social experiment.
NEWS
August 11, 2012 | By Craig Nakano
When the L.A. design firm Commune shared photos of its new pop-up in Japan -- a traveling shop and cafe featuring collaborations with Heath Ceramics and"Beginners" director and artist Mike Mills, among others -- what initially caught our eye weren't Mills' limited-edition prints, which are great, but rather a series of fingerprint graphics lining one wall. It turns out the prints in question belong to the thumb of Bauhaus artist Herbert Bayer. Commune uses the thumbprint as a maker's mark, its signature "for anything we do that is handcrafted," Roman Alonso, a partner in the firm, said via email in response to our inquiry.
NEWS
October 16, 1988 | SHERYL STOLBERG, Times Staff Writer
A Watts-based group that set up camp in rural Oregon--ostensibly to help inner-city youths through what it called "toughness training"--became the target of a criminal investigation this weekend when authorities arrested six of its members in the fatal beating of their leader's daughter and took custody of 53 children under the group's care. The children, aged 3 months to 16 years, are all from the Los Angeles area and were found living in a four-bedroom farmhouse in Sandy, Ore.
NEWS
July 29, 1995 | From Associated Press
Two followers of a guru who founded a lavish commune in a remote desert town were convicted Friday of conspiring to murder a federal prosecutor investigating their sect. Sally-Anne Croft and Susan Hagan face a sentence of up to life in prison for plotting to kill Charles Turner when he was Oregon's U.S. attorney. Turner, who was never attacked, was investigating allegations that followers of the Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh were conducting sham marriages to circumvent immigration law.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1987 | RUSSELL CHANDLER, Times Religion Writer
The dusty streets are deserted now. Rajneeshpuram, once the teeming commune of 4,000 red-clad disciples of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh, is just a "bad dream" in the minds of many longtime residents nearby. The leader of this ill-starred experimental paradise is long gone, having returned with his religion of personal freedom and sexual liberation to his native India. The 64,000-acre ranch that Rajneesh followers bought for $5.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1988 | LYNN O'SHAUGHNESSY, Times Staff Writer
About 60 sheriff's deputies raided a fundamentalist Christian sect's rural Saugus commune early Thursday morning and arrested four sect members over alleged child abuse. Tony Alamo, the leader of commune, was still being sought late Thursday. Authorities said the raid on the Tony and Susan Alamo Foundation commune, scattered along Sierra Highway, was prompted by complaints from a child--removed from the commune last week--that he and other children had been beaten.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1998 | JOHN CANALIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Piecemakers and the city have made peace. Members of the religious commune agreed to a plea-bargain on misdemeanor charges that they hosted special events at their Country Store without city permits and allowed unsafe conditions in a storage warehouse. Terms of the agreement, reached Friday and announced Monday, require three members to serve probation, perform community service and pay a total of $2,000. "They've admitted their guilt for breaking the city's laws," said Steven H.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1992 | From Religious News Service
Hippies live. So do "Jesus freaks," many of them in a later incarnation: Christian evangelicals. Those memorable symbols of the turbulent 1960s in America are alive and well, two American scholars of religion say.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2012 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
There are so many things to feel guilty about liking in the pure and prurient guilty pleasure that is "Wanderlust. " Starring Paul Rudd and Jennifer Aniston, this is a comedy of no manners about finding your bliss and escaping the modern grind. The laughter is served up naughty and nice, and frequently au naturel, earning it an R rating when perhaps RR (really raunchy) would have been more appropriate. Appropriateness, however, has pretty much been jettisoned by the filmmakers, who have opted instead for the good-fun-found-in-bad-taste tradition of "The Hangover.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2011 | By Patrick Pacheco, Special to the Los Angeles Times
? At a recent preview of the Broadway revival of "That Championship Season," actor Jason Patric took a fall so convincingly that the audience gasped. The headlong tumble down the steps was part of his role as Tom Daley, the cynical sports star turned alcoholic failure who joins a 20-year reunion of his former basketball champs at the home of their coach. But the bruises are real enough. "Most of my injuries happened during the first week of rehearsal," recalls the 44-year-old actor.
SPORTS
March 22, 2009 | T.J. SIMERS
ESPN brackets, shmackets -- let's see how good the President is against the spread. Here's the scene -- it starts Thursday morning here, a bigger crowd in the Mandalay Bay Sports Book than in some of the arenas hosting first-round NCAA tournament games. Maybe it's time Staples Center considered putting in a few slot machines to encourage better attendance at Clippers games. Every chair is taken by men -- with the exception of the one woman sitting in the back row.
TRAVEL
August 17, 2008 | Hugo Martin, Times Staff Writer
SECRET SPOTS OF THE WEST We asked you to nominate your favorite vacation places in the West -- your travel touchstones, so to speak -- and you came back with a satchel full of suggestions. We sifted and sorted and chose six to explore for ourselves. Marvelous or mundane? You be the judge. -- "It's so peaceful there. It's just such a beautiful place to go," says Michele Johnson of Los Angeles, in nominating the Best Friends Animal Society's sanctuary in Utah. THE SETTING Angel Canyon, a postcard-perfect, rust-colored sandstone canyon outside of Kanab, Utah, is home to the Best Friends animal sanctuary, said to be the country's largest no-kill animal shelter.
IMAGE
March 9, 2008 | Adam Tschorn, Times Staff Writer
There isn't anything remotely fashionable about this stretch of Burbank Boulevard in North Hollywood, where car dealerships, auto body repair shops and fast-food joints sit cheek by jowl, baking in the sun. But duck down the 5600 block of Elmer Avenue, through the rusted metal gate, past the treehouse and broken-down school bus, and you'll find clothes so fresh the paint hasn't even dried yet. Welcome to "the Compound," the ramshackle home of Elmer...
MAGAZINE
June 3, 2007 | David L. Ulin, David L. Ulin is book editor of The Times, and the author of "The Myth of Solid Ground: Earthquakes, Prediction and the Fault Line Between Reason and Faith."
Rick Caruso's office is palatial--that's the only way to describe it. Walk in and it stretches before you like a stage set: one vast room, subdivided into areas (a bar, a desk, spaces for conversation), with framed family photos on nearly every surface and a conference/dining room off to one side through a set of double doors. Outside Caruso's third-floor windows, the Grove stretches like the boulevard he means for it to be; noise drifts up from the sidewalk, a low-grade conversational buzz.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 1990 | From United Press International
Federal officials say they will attempt to confiscate everything at the Hare Krishna New Vrindaban commune except the temple, alleging that it was all purchased with money obtained through fraudulent means. Three members of the Hare Krishna community--including its founder-leader, Keith Gordon Ham, 54, also known as Kirtanananda Swami Bhaktipada--were indicted by a federal grand jury last week, accused of conspiring to murder two dissident members of the sect in West Virginia and Los Angeles. U.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1991 | MICHAEL CONNELLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Religious cult leader Tony Alamo, appearing in a courtroom packed with longtime followers, was ordered Friday to be moved to Arkansas to face charges that he threatened to kidnap and hang a federal judge.
TRAVEL
May 6, 2007 | Susan Chenery, Special to The Times
WALK through the Vatican at night and you can hear your footsteps on the marble floors, echoing down the centuries, along corridors where great artists once trod, through the opulent apartments where popes plotted stratagems for power. On through the loggias, vaults and galleries where a succession of pontiffs surrounded themselves with regal splendor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2007 | Carla Hall, Times Staff Writer
SUNDAY night, 7 p.m. Time for the Sugar Shack weekly house meeting. The group gathers on mismatched pieces of furniture in the living room. Dalai, the resident calico cat, drapes herself on the back of an old leather lounge chair. They tick through the agenda: Is it OK to buy fabric for new curtains? (Yes.) What color is the downstairs bathroom being painted? (White.) Oh, and the sofa in the garden -- it's got to go.
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