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BUSINESS
March 24, 2001 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Employees of Chinese Daily News in Monterey Park, one of the largest Asian daily newspapers in the United States, voted this week to unionize. Organizers with the Communication Workers of America said the vote covering 152 workers is part of a trend by foreign-language media to join unions. The bargaining unit covers all employees, from reporters to printers.
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BUSINESS
March 24, 2001 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Employees of Chinese Daily News in Monterey Park, one of the largest Asian daily newspapers in the United States, voted this week to unionize. Organizers with the Communication Workers of America said the vote covering 152 workers is part of a trend by foreign-language media to join unions. The bargaining unit covers all employees, from reporters to printers.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1987 | KENNETH REICH AND ROBERT D. DAVILA, Times Staff Writers
The cutting of a cable television company's power lines, blacking out the second half of Sunday's Lakers championship game for 20,000 Eagle Rock-area customers, prompted charges from the company Monday that a "gangster" element in its workers' labor union is committing sabotage. Leonard Tow, president of Century Southwest Cable Television Inc.
BUSINESS
September 30, 1997 | STUART SILVERSTEIN and JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Providing the biggest private-sector recruiting victory for any U.S. union in more than a decade, passenger service employees at US Airways have voted to join the Communications Workers of America, officials said Monday. If it survives a pending court challenge by the company, the election will provide union representation for close to 10,000 US Airways employees, including ticket counter, reservations and airport gate workers.
NEWS
September 23, 1989 | BOB BAKER, Times Labor Writer
In what could set the stage for another California phone strike, the membership of the Communication Workers of America rebuffed its leaders Friday by voting resoundingly to reject a contract that was tentatively approved last month by union and Pacific Bell negotiators. The tentative settlement had ended a two-week work stoppage by more than 40,000 employees. The vote against ratification was announced in Oakland, where ballots submitted by workers from 30 CWA locals were tallied.
BUSINESS
October 29, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Union Plans to Organize NCR Workers: Officials of the Communications Workers of America, which represents more than 100,000 AT&T workers, said it will seek to organize employees of NCR Corp. in the wake of the merger of the two companies. About 40 CWA members from across the country staged an informational picket line outside NCR's headquarters in Dayton, Ohio. Under the merger, NCR became a subsidiary of AT&T. About 1,400 of NCR's 28,000 U.S. workers are organized.
NEWS
August 19, 1989 | BOB BAKER, Times Labor Writer
Pacific Bell officials said Friday that "substantial progress" has been made this week toward resolving a 13-day-old strike by 40,000 telephone workers, but officials of the Communications Workers of America said they are less optimistic about the possibility of a quick settlement. Both sides maintained their policy of refusing to discuss any specifics of what are described as "informal" conferences between their chief negotiators.
NEWS
August 20, 1989
Random negotiations were under way in the telephone walkout against three regional "Baby Bell" companies. Bell Atlantic and the Communications Workers of America, having reached a tentative pact, conducted talks on local issues, and a company spokesman said he was optimistic the Tuesday midnight deadline would be met.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1989
The union representing 15,000 hourly employees of GTE California said Friday it will take a strike vote against the telephone company next week. The union's contract with GTE was to expire tonight but has been temporarily extended until Tuesday at midnight. Communications Workers of America represents operators, customer representatives, repair people and other GTE employees. GTE spokesman Larry Cox said a strike would cause a slowdown in repairs as well as new orders for telephone service.
BUSINESS
October 29, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Union Plans to Organize NCR Workers: Officials of the Communications Workers of America, which represents more than 100,000 AT&T workers, said it will seek to organize employees of NCR Corp. in the wake of the merger of the two companies. About 40 CWA members from across the country staged an informational picket line outside NCR's headquarters in Dayton, Ohio. Under the merger, NCR became a subsidiary of AT&T. About 1,400 of NCR's 28,000 U.S. workers are organized.
NEWS
September 23, 1989 | BOB BAKER, Times Labor Writer
In what could set the stage for another California phone strike, the membership of the Communication Workers of America rebuffed its leaders Friday by voting resoundingly to reject a contract that was tentatively approved last month by union and Pacific Bell negotiators. The tentative settlement had ended a two-week work stoppage by more than 40,000 employees. The vote against ratification was announced in Oakland, where ballots submitted by workers from 30 CWA locals were tallied.
NEWS
August 20, 1989
Random negotiations were under way in the telephone walkout against three regional "Baby Bell" companies. Bell Atlantic and the Communications Workers of America, having reached a tentative pact, conducted talks on local issues, and a company spokesman said he was optimistic the Tuesday midnight deadline would be met.
NEWS
August 19, 1989 | BOB BAKER, Times Labor Writer
Pacific Bell officials said Friday that "substantial progress" has been made this week toward resolving a 13-day-old strike by 40,000 telephone workers, but officials of the Communications Workers of America said they are less optimistic about the possibility of a quick settlement. Both sides maintained their policy of refusing to discuss any specifics of what are described as "informal" conferences between their chief negotiators.
NEWS
August 10, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
No progress was reported Wednesday in informal talks in Oakland between Pacific Bell and representatives of 42,000 striking telephone workers in the fourth day of a work stoppage that also involves two regional telephone companies on the East Coast. As the strike continued, tensions were high outside phone company offices.
NEWS
August 9, 1989 | BOB BAKER, Times Labor Writer
Eileen Colson, a 38-year-old Pacific Bell clerk, was walking a picket line in Burbank with her 6-year-old daughter, Kristen. It was her first time on a picket line. Colson, one of more than 150,000 striking employees at three regional U.S. telephone companies in California and 14 other states, was upset because her union had told her the proposed contract would require her to pay for a greater share of her health-care benefits. "Don't take it away from us," she said emotionally.
BUSINESS
May 27, 1989
AT&T and Unions Report Progress: AT&T and its unions reported progress in negotiations, but remaining disputes over wages and particularly health benefits left in doubt whether a new contract could be settled before tonight's deadline. "Things have started to heat up," said Francine Zucker, a spokeswoman for the Communications Workers of America. "I think we're going to get very close, and we may reach a settlement--but that can change quickly." AT&T officials said the company offered to limit its use of temporary workers, a key union job-security demand.
NEWS
August 9, 1989 | BOB BAKER, Times Labor Writer
Eileen Colson, a 38-year-old Pacific Bell clerk, was walking a picket line in Burbank with her 6-year-old daughter, Kristen. It was her first time on a picket line. Colson, one of more than 150,000 striking employees at three regional U.S. telephone companies in California and 14 other states, was upset because her union had told her the proposed contract would require her to pay for a greater share of her health-care benefits. "Don't take it away from us," she said emotionally.
BUSINESS
July 29, 1989 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The 50,000 members of the Communications Workers of America who work for Pacific Bell and Nevada Bell have authorized a strike if a new contract is not reached by Aug. 5, CWA officials said Friday. "We're having a difficult time bargaining for any gains," said Marie Malliett, president of CWA Local 9410 in San Francisco. The union's contracts with the two subsidiaries of San Francisco-based Pacific Telesis Group expire Aug. 5.
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