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Communications Industry

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NEWS
April 28, 1994 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The communications industry, which has a big stake in government decisions about the "information superhighway," gave more than $50 million in political action committee and "soft money" contributions to congressional candidates and political party units during the last decade, a Common Cause study showed Wednesday. AT&T donated $5.
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BUSINESS
November 28, 2010 | By Richard Waters
Faced with the evidence presented in this book about the evolution of promising communications and media networks over the last century, it is hard to feel optimistic about the Internet. As told by Tim Wu of Columbia University in "The Master Switch: The Rise and Fall of Information Empires," the history of modern communications ? from telephone to cable television ? is one of freedoms thwarted. Monopolies or cartels, often sanctioned by government in the name of efficiency and public service, have a habit of asserting themselves.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1993 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Heeere's Johnny: Johnny Carson will be honored Monday in New York for helping young people get their start in show biz when he was host of "The Tonight Show." Ted Koppel will present the award to Carson on behalf of the Center for Communication, a nonprofit group dedicated to encouraging young people in the communications industry.
BUSINESS
June 9, 2002 | EDMUND SANDERS and SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Shortly after his appointment last year as chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, Michael K. Powell surprised and delighted a cable trade show audience by performing a somersault on his way to the podium. The spontaneous stunt--a spoof of the acrobatic act that had preceded him onstage--was classic Powell, symbolizing the energy that industry leaders hoped the new FCC chief would bring to the stodgy but powerful agency. At this year's trade show, Powell avoided the circus acts.
BUSINESS
January 26, 1993 | Dean Takahashi / Times staff writer
Hello, England: Subscriber Computing Inc. in Irvine, which makes software for cellular phone and paging companies, said it has opened a support office in England to serve its clients in Europe. The office in Middlesex, England, will be headed by David Jones, a portable communications industry veteran who previously worked for a unit of British Telecom. The company makes software that allows paging companies and cellular phone firms to automatically bill their customers for use of services.
NEWS
December 19, 1993
I was in your city and read the article about Lovelace Lee III ("Chasing a Dream: What One Man Can Do," Nov. 28). I share the same view of the communications industry that does little or nothing to show the true colors of our society. Sometimes I wonder whether or not they believe in the demographics or data they pay so much money for. It is time for African Americans to invest more in themselves and a communications system to tell their stories. What are they afraid of? America will slowly be strong when we all are strong and productive.
BUSINESS
February 12, 1989
Those who ignore the lessons of history are doomed to repeat it. This tenet is being proven today in the area of government regulation. Government regulations for private industry were not created by a bunch of back-room congressmen just fishing for laws to pass. They were created in response to an outcry against abuses perpetrated by the greedy and powerful. Regulatory agencies were created to protect the public interest in areas of vital concern against those who would abuse their power and take advantage of innocent people.
BUSINESS
September 7, 1998 | KAREN KAPLAN
There's a new subject on the syllabus this fall at USC: What are the legal and policy implications of changes in the communications industry? To answer that question, the university last week established the USC Center for Communications Law and Policy at USC Law School. The Annenberg School for Communication and the Annenberg Center for Communication will also sponsor the new interdisciplinary center.
BUSINESS
August 18, 1995 | From Associated Press
A computer trade group wants a federal judge to expand the scope of an antitrust settlement that Microsoft Corp. reached last year with the Justice Department. The Computer and Communications Industry Assn. has filed a motion asking U.S. District Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson to alter the consent decree that restricts Microsoft from engaging in unfair licensing practices for its Windows 3.1 software. Microsoft filed court papers Thursday opposing the request, a day after the group's filing.
BUSINESS
December 14, 1995 | JONATHAN WEBER, Jonathan Weber is technology editor for The Times' business section. His e-mail address is Jonathan.Weber@latimes.com
[It] is a highly controversial proposal to restructure the communications industry. Currently, the industry is nominally governed by the Communications Act of 1934. This law, however, is so outdated and so inadequate to modern technologies that the industry is de facto governed by a range of FCC and court rulings. That some sort of comprehensive communications legislation is needed is not disputed by any party.
NEWS
November 8, 1999 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From this little-known university town at the northern end of the Gulf of Bothnia, an army of Nordic computer nerds looks poised to overrun America's Internet innovators and software supremos as the desktop-dominated world goes wireless. Nowhere has mobile communication caught on as it has in sparsely populated Finland, where nearly 70% of the 5.3 million residents are armed with wireless phones and an ever-expanding array of tools, games and services they can use on the fly.
BUSINESS
July 17, 1999 | ELIZABETH DOUGLASS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moving to add digital video to its service offerings, SBC Communications Inc. struck a broad marketing and distribution deal with El Segundo-based DirecTV Inc. that allows the phone company to package satellite television with its phone and Internet services in seven states, including California. The pact, announced late Friday, represents a key step in positioning San Antonio-based SBC to challenge AT&T Corp. and others for national dominance in the communications industry.
BUSINESS
September 7, 1998 | KAREN KAPLAN
There's a new subject on the syllabus this fall at USC: What are the legal and policy implications of changes in the communications industry? To answer that question, the university last week established the USC Center for Communications Law and Policy at USC Law School. The Annenberg School for Communication and the Annenberg Center for Communication will also sponsor the new interdisciplinary center.
BUSINESS
April 5, 1997 | MARLA MATZER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Financial transactions in the communications industry topped $100 billion for the first time last year, according to a report from New York media investment banking firm Veronis, Suhler & Associates. The report said $113 billion in transactions included mergers and acquisitions, public offerings, private placements, redemptions and other corporate financings made by publicly reporting companies during 1996.
NEWS
March 5, 1997 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When they've already changed the world, what are two brothers supposed to do as retirement looms? For Ben and Harold Rosen, the answer is to try to do it again. The Louisiana-bred, Caltech-educated Rosens have embarked on their biggest challenge ever--to produce a clean, efficient and powerful automotive power source that will do nothing less than replace the internal combustion engine. If that sounds familiar, it is. There have been countless schemes to rid the world of the noxious power plant.
BUSINESS
December 30, 1996
A.T. Kearney, a management consulting firm in New York, offers up the following predictions for the fast-changing communications industry: * Congress will call for more regulation of the Internet, especially to prevent security abuses and potential breakdowns due to lack of capacity. * Baby Bells Ameritech and US West will merge, following in the footsteps of Pacific Telesis and SBC Communications and Bell Atlantic and Nynex.
BUSINESS
April 5, 1997 | MARLA MATZER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Financial transactions in the communications industry topped $100 billion for the first time last year, according to a report from New York media investment banking firm Veronis, Suhler & Associates. The report said $113 billion in transactions included mergers and acquisitions, public offerings, private placements, redemptions and other corporate financings made by publicly reporting companies during 1996.
NEWS
February 8, 1995 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a bold overhaul of the rules governing foreign ownership of U.S. communications firms, the Federal Communications Commission on Tuesday proposed scrapping the 60-year-old limits on foreign ownership in cases where other countries open their markets to U.S. companies. The new rules, likely to be adopted following a comment period, are designed both to help pry open foreign telecommunications markets and to spur investment and competition in the burgeoning domestic communications industry.
BUSINESS
February 2, 1996 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congress on Thursday passed a sweeping measure to rewrite the nation's telecommunications laws. The bill will have a major and immediate impact on the communications industry, though the fallout for consumers will be more gradual. Q: Why are legislators and industry officials so enthusiastic about the telecom reform bill?
BUSINESS
December 14, 1995 | JONATHAN WEBER, Jonathan Weber is technology editor for The Times' business section. His e-mail address is Jonathan.Weber@latimes.com
[It] is a highly controversial proposal to restructure the communications industry. Currently, the industry is nominally governed by the Communications Act of 1934. This law, however, is so outdated and so inadequate to modern technologies that the industry is de facto governed by a range of FCC and court rulings. That some sort of comprehensive communications legislation is needed is not disputed by any party.
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