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September 22, 1991 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. presidents from Dwight D. Eisenhower to Ronald Reagan worried about communism in America's back yard. Obviously, times have changed: As world communism cracks and crumbles, the "Red menace" in Latin America is all but forgotten. Today, most Latin American Communist parties have renounced old dreams of Cuban-style revolution. Some are splitting up, falling apart or withering away. Others are overhauling their ideologies to embrace democratic and even free-market principles.
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NEWS
September 22, 1991 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. presidents from Dwight D. Eisenhower to Ronald Reagan worried about communism in America's back yard. Obviously, times have changed: As world communism cracks and crumbles, the "Red menace" in Latin America is all but forgotten. Today, most Latin American Communist parties have renounced old dreams of Cuban-style revolution. Some are splitting up, falling apart or withering away. Others are overhauling their ideologies to embrace democratic and even free-market principles.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1985
In Michael Mindlin Jr.'s letter (May 14) on the situation in Nicaragua, he seems to believe that a "3-foot midget" country like Nicaragua could do no harm to an "8-foot giant" country like the United States. How soon people forget that a previously little known country called Iran had President Carter and all Americans at their mercy. The spread of communism in Latin America and its power should be on the minds of every American. It is time that all Americans get involved to stop any and all communism in the Western world before the United States is the only democratic nation left.
NEWS
July 4, 1991
Robert Wesson, a political science scholar and Hoover Institution senior research fellow, has died of cancer. He was 71. Wesson died Saturday at his home on the Stanford University campus. The author of more than 30 books on political science, international affairs, communism and Latin America, Wesson was a writer and researcher in natural science and philosophy. "I am deeply saddened by Robert's death.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1986
Messing evidences a total insularity in regard to the consistent American anti-communist foreign policy pursued since the end of World War II. Whether pursued by a Democratic or Republican administration, the interpretation of geopolitics has been compatible. Any shades of differences between them have been blurred by an anti-communism that has become orthodoxy. Harry Truman expressed his concern for the threat of communism in the Truman Doctrine. John Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson, although liberal on domestic policy, were hawkish in containing communism.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1986 | LEE MARGULIES, Times Staff Writer
With the House scheduled to vote Thursday on President Reagan's controversial proposal to provide $100 million in U.S. aid to anti-Sandinista rebels, the producers of public television's "Frontline" series have juggled their schedule to present a documentary tonight about the contras. Reagan will not be pleased. While most of the program is rooted in the United States, where private citizens have taken it upon themselves to underwrite the contras , "Who's Running This War?"
WORLD
June 29, 2010 | By Devorah Lauter, Special to The Times
Manuel Noriega, the aging former dictator of Panama, went on trial here Monday on charges of laundering money by stowing profits from drug trafficking in French bank accounts and purchasing luxurious Parisian apartments. Noriega, 76, was extradited to France two months ago from U.S. custody, where he was held for 20 years after being deposed and convicted of helping Colombian cartels ship drugs to American soil. He did not speak in his defense Monday, but called out his name and birth date in a surprisingly strong voice that contrasted with his hunched-over physical appearance.
WORLD
January 22, 2006 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
Canada and Spain invest in oil exploration and beachfront hotels. The United States imposes an economic embargo. Eastern European nations offer up their own success in throwing off communism. Latin America's leftist leaders, meanwhile, take a collective none-of-our-business posture.
NEWS
July 25, 1992 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Cuban President Fidel Castro a disapproving bystander, the nations of Iberia and Latin America agreed here Friday to a liberal agenda of political, economic and social goals aimed at carving a Latin niche in a world dramatically changed by the collapse of communism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1998 | GEORGE WEIGEL, George Weigel, a senior fellow of the Ethics and Public Policy Center in Washington, is writing a biography of Pope John Paul II
Pope John Paul II's visit to Cuba is, from his point of view, a pastoral pilgrimage aimed at strengthening the Catholic Church for whatever future lies ahead of it. The Cuban government, for its part, invited the pope as part of its effort to reintegrate Cuba into the life of the Western hemisphere. Immediate interests, ecclesiastical and political, will be in play throughout the week. But if we widen the analytic lens, the papal pilgrimage looks rather more dramatic.
OPINION
January 21, 1990 | Michael Massing, Michael Massing, a New York writer, is a 1989 Alica Patterson Fellow
In a matter of weeks, the United States switched from fighting the Cold War to fighting the drug war. The invasion of Panama ushered in the new era; we will pay any price, bear any burden, to combat the drug menace. A Marine patrol has already fired on suspected traffickers crossing the Mexican border and the Pentagon drafted plans (now on hold) to mount a naval blockade off the coast of Colombia.
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