Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCommunist Party China
IN THE NEWS

Communist Party China

NEWS
April 4, 1992 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
China's Parliament cast new doubt Friday on the political future of Premier Li Peng by amending a key government report to add a warning against excessive leftism. The decision to revise the report, which Li delivered last month at the opening of the annual meeting of the National People's Congress, is widely seen as an attempt by Communist Party reformers to undercut the power of Li and other hard-line leaders.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 13, 1992 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A warning against excessive "leftism" issued Thursday by the Communist Party Politburo marks a fundamental ideological shift with profound implications for China's future. Ever since the 1989 crackdown on China's pro-democracy movement, China's leaders have placed top priority on political repression, which was aimed at stabilizing Communist Party rule.
NEWS
March 12, 1992 | From Times Wire Services
China's Communist Party has staked its future on economic reform in a triumph for 87-year-old leader Deng Xiaoping over hard-liners devoted to Marxist ideology. In a two-day meeting this week, the party's Politburo vowed to keep policies of reform unchanged for 100 years and said those who put politics first must be stopped, said a report splashed across front pages of major newspapers today.
NEWS
March 8, 1992 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Senior Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping has triggered an aggressive effort by reformers within the Communist Party to oust hard-line ideologues from key party and government positions. Acting Minister of Culture He Jingzhi has already submitted his resignation, Chinese sources told foreign reporters in Beijing on Saturday. Others facing pressure from reformist forces include Wang Renzhi, head of the party propaganda department, and Gao Di, who heads the official newspaper People's Daily.
NEWS
January 23, 1992 | Reuters
Disgraced former Chinese Communist Party leader Zhao Ziyang has been cleared of charges of counter-revolution made against him after 1989 pro-democracy protests were crushed, a reliable source said today. The source said that Zhao has been cleared by a party committee investigating him on charges of splitting the party and supporting the "rioting"--the official term to describe the demonstrations that were crushed by the army around Beijing's Tian An Men Square on June 3-4, 1989.
BUSINESS
December 16, 1991 | From Associated Press
Chinese companies and individuals, worried about the stability of the last great communist regime, are moving billions of dollars out of China, say diplomats, bankers and real estate brokers. They report that state-owned companies, collectives and the private firms permitted to operate in recent years are putting money into foreign bank accounts and property, including condominiums in the United States.
NEWS
November 13, 1991 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush and the U.S. Congress, while seeming to disagree on China policy, are actually united in an attempt to bring about the collapse of Chinese communism, asserts an internal party analysis leaked to reporters here Tuesday. To hold on to power in the face of such Western pressure, the document says, the Communist Party must enforce its dictatorship and fight internal supporters of democratic socialism.
NEWS
November 12, 1991 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Michael Jackson's voice blared out in the brisk autumn air, but still it was a slow day at the sidewalk army recruitment booth in Beijing's suburban campus district. "I'm bad, I'm bad, don't you know it!" boomed out the rock star's voice on a loudspeaker set up to attract passersby. But not a single Chinese youth was anywhere near the army propaganda billboards and recruiters' table. The irony of the scene clearly escaped those in charge.
NEWS
September 14, 1991 | DAVID HOLLEY and CHRISTINE COURTNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Martin Lee, this British colony's most prominent advocate of greater democracy, is a man who seldom minces words. So, there may have been some surprised listeners recently when Lee, campaigning for votes in a key legislative election set for Sunday, seemed about to dodge a question. The question, about whether communism faces the same fate in China that it has in the Soviet Union, was too sensitive to answer directly, Lee said.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|