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Communist Party China

NEWS
January 23, 1992 | Reuters
Disgraced former Chinese Communist Party leader Zhao Ziyang has been cleared of charges of counter-revolution made against him after 1989 pro-democracy protests were crushed, a reliable source said today. The source said that Zhao has been cleared by a party committee investigating him on charges of splitting the party and supporting the "rioting"--the official term to describe the demonstrations that were crushed by the army around Beijing's Tian An Men Square on June 3-4, 1989.
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BUSINESS
December 16, 1991 | From Associated Press
Chinese companies and individuals, worried about the stability of the last great communist regime, are moving billions of dollars out of China, say diplomats, bankers and real estate brokers. They report that state-owned companies, collectives and the private firms permitted to operate in recent years are putting money into foreign bank accounts and property, including condominiums in the United States.
NEWS
November 13, 1991 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush and the U.S. Congress, while seeming to disagree on China policy, are actually united in an attempt to bring about the collapse of Chinese communism, asserts an internal party analysis leaked to reporters here Tuesday. To hold on to power in the face of such Western pressure, the document says, the Communist Party must enforce its dictatorship and fight internal supporters of democratic socialism.
NEWS
September 14, 1991 | DAVID HOLLEY and CHRISTINE COURTNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Martin Lee, this British colony's most prominent advocate of greater democracy, is a man who seldom minces words. So, there may have been some surprised listeners recently when Lee, campaigning for votes in a key legislative election set for Sunday, seemed about to dodge a question. The question, about whether communism faces the same fate in China that it has in the Soviet Union, was too sensitive to answer directly, Lee said.
NEWS
August 27, 1991 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an apparent response to the collapse of Communist authority in the Soviet Union, China sharply reminded its citizens Monday that hard-line leaders here are willing to use the army to defend their power. Vice President Wang Zhen, in remarks published by all major state-run newspapers, stressed that the dictatorship in Beijing will not tolerate any challenge to its rule. "The People's Liberation Army is a strong pillar of the people's democratic dictatorship.
NEWS
August 21, 1991 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The ouster of Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev brings hard-line Chinese leaders a windfall both in domestic politics and international diplomacy. But it also carries potential risks. The Soviet coup is likely to make it more difficult for the reformist wing of the Chinese Communist Party to launch any renewed push for political relaxation, foreign analysts and Chinese intellectuals in Beijing say.
NEWS
July 2, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Communist Party leader Jiang Zemin vowed that the nation will remain a socialist dictatorship, with no room for capitalism or multi-party democracy. He addressed a meeting in Beijing celebrating the party's 70th birthday. Many Beijing residents, however, were in no celebratory mood, remembering the thousands killed or injured June 3-4, 1989, in pro-democracy protests. Some voiced a subtle message of dissent through T-shirts, some of which read, "I'm depressed, leave me alone."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1991 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The poem that appeared last March in the overseas edition of China's Communist Party newspaper, People's Daily, was one of the journal's usual patriotic offerings, which are packed with lofty ideals and sentiment and often written in tribute to the party and the nation. But for the attentive Chinese reader, there was a secret meaning buried within. By reading a line of characters diagonally through the poem, the poet's real message appeared: "Li Peng step down, pacify the people's anger."
NEWS
June 2, 1991 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three reformist Chinese leaders ousted from power two years ago have been given vice ministerial posts in what amounts to partial rehabilitation, official media announced Saturday. Most prominent of the three is Hu Qili, 62, a former member of the policy-setting Politburo Standing Committee. In the mid-1980s, Hu was viewed by many Chinese and foreign observers as a likely future head of the Communist Party.
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