Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCommunist Party Ussr
IN THE NEWS

Communist Party Ussr

NEWS
February 5, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The rumors have faded that President Mikhail S. Gorbachev is about to resign, frustrated by his inability to pull the Soviet Union out of its deepening crisis. But real questions remain here about how certain a hold he has on power and about his ability to push through further reforms of the country's political and economic system. Gorbachev will be tested hard on both issues at a meeting, opening today in the Kremlin, of the Communist Party's policy-making Central Committee.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 5, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A quarter of a million people, gathered outside the walls of the Kremlin in central Moscow, called Sunday for an end to the Soviet Union's system of one-party rule in one of the biggest political demonstrations since the Bolshevik Revolution brought the Communists to power more than 70 years ago.
NEWS
April 13, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Mikhail S. Gorbachev is being pressed by conservatives within the Soviet Communist Party to call an urgent meeting of the party's policy-making Central Committee to discuss the looming split in the party, informed political sources said Thursday. So far he is resisting the pressure, out of apprehension over the passions that such a debate would arouse, the sources said. Boris V.
NEWS
July 8, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev halted a hunt for scapegoats in his Kremlin leadership Saturday with a display of power and political skill, reining in belligerent conservatives who accused his top lieutenants of driving the nation to the brink of ruin.
NEWS
July 2, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the Soviet Union trapped in an increasingly grave domestic crisis, the ruling Communist Party begins a crucial congress here today with the nation's fate and its own future the main items on the agenda. President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, who will open the congress with a lengthy report as the party's general secretary, is expected to bid for a mandate to initiate even bolder reforms that will establish a multi-party political system and accelerate development of a market economy here.
NEWS
July 31, 1990
The second round of talks between the African National Congress and the South African government scheduled next Monday had been expected to resolve remaining obstacles to an ANC cease-fire and formal constitutional negotiations. But a possible hitch has emerged in government suspicions that the revitalized Communist Party, influential in the ANC's military wing, plans an armed insurrection if peace talks break down.
NEWS
July 17, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration will open a dialogue with Boris N. Yeltsin and other Soviet Communist Party defectors if they establish themselves as a genuine political opposition, Secretary of State James A. Baker III said Monday. Baker said the Administration hopes to deal with Soviet dissidents just as it did with the democratic forces that ousted Communist regimes in Poland, Hungary, Czechoslovakia and East Germany.
NEWS
July 27, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While much of the Soviet Union appears to be daydreaming about Black Sea beaches or a dacha lost among the cool birches, Vladimir Lysenko and his comrades have set off by train, boat and plane on grueling journeys far off the beaten track, to places like Vladivostok and the sweltering Volga delta. They're not vacationing but trying to persuade as many members of the Communist Party as possible to defect and join their reformist group, the Democratic Platform.
NEWS
July 1, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
However dramatic the changes that President Mikhail S. Gorbachev has worked in the Soviet Union over the last five years, they were just a prologue to the battle now being waged over the future of the country. The struggle is over the nature of its political system, the type of economy it will have, how it will use its remaining influence as a superpower, what kind of society it will be.
NEWS
July 11, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Where did we go wrong?" That question has burned throughout the debate at the 28th Soviet Communist Party Congress, searing radicals and conservatives alike as they have sought to apportion blame for their nation's increasingly desperate decline. Guilt for the past, far more than hope for the future, has permeated the delegates' discussions for the past nine days. The hunt for culprits, contemporary and historical, quickly overtook the search for bold new leaders.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|