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Community Access Channels

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NEWS
November 26, 1987
Costa Mesa residents recently were asked to rate the types of programming they would most like to see on cable TV community access channels. 1,441 people responded to the survey conducted by the city's cable television committee. Programs they would watch on a regular basis: Movie classics 47% Travel 27% Arts 26% "How-to" programs 21% Business/finance 20% Local sports 20% Civic/political 20% Fitness/health 19% Children 14% Science/math 13% Programs they would watch occasionally: 1.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2000 | Tariq Malik, (714) 520-2503
Residents should be able to witness City Council meetings without leaving their homes in September, when city officials expect to make the first cable broadcasts from council chambers. In a recent council meeting, city officials approved a four-camera system to televise meetings on Cable Channel 3, which has been designated for educational and local government programming.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1990 | KEVIN BRASS
"Kill Them With Comedy" is not so much a cable community access show as humor anarchy, a tribute to the "Saturday Night Live" generation gone out of control.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1997 | MIMI KO CRUZ
Three years ago, Alan Morton, one of the city's most vocal critics, succeeded in convincing the City Council to televise its meetings. Now, he wants the Fullerton School District board to do the same. The 72-year-old retired real estate broker and aerospace executive has already gathered more than 700 signatures on a petition, requesting the district start airing its meetings on the local cable television station. District officials have said they are considering Morton's proposal.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 1991 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
While the networks and their local affiliates scramble to cover the latest news from Saudi Arabia and the Pentagon, low-budget producers on cable television's community access stations are reaching out to cities and towns with the view from the grass roots.
NEWS
January 30, 1994 | MARTIN MILLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sometimes, it's more like watching "America's Funniest Home Videos" than the dignified proceedings of representative democracy. In Tustin, a speaker brandishing a stuffed rooster urged the City Council to lift a longstanding ban on live farm animals. In Newport Beach, a city official--who had tuned in at home--phoned in during a meeting to talk a colleague through technical difficulties he was experiencing with a council video presentation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1997 | MIMI KO CRUZ
Three years ago, Alan Morton, one of the city's most vocal critics, succeeded in convincing the City Council to televise its meetings. Now, he wants the Fullerton School District board to do the same. The 72-year-old retired real estate broker and aerospace executive has already gathered more than 700 signatures on a petition, requesting the district start airing its meetings on the local cable television station. District officials have said they are considering Morton's proposal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1997 | MIMI KO CRUZ
Police will star in a new cable television program aimed at educating the public about crime prevention starting today. The half-hour program, called "Street Beat," will be produced by the Police Department and will be shown for the first time at 5:30 p.m. on Channel 53. It will be reshown throughout the upcoming weeks at various hours. The first episode will deal with domestic abuse. Officers will offer information that could be helpful to families dealing with the issue, police said.
NEWS
April 4, 1992 | JESSE KATZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three years ago, after gang members killed her elder son, Lorna Hawkins channeled her grief by creating a public-access TV program called "Drive-by Agony." Each month, she invites other parents of slain children to mourn their loss before the cameras, demanding that viewers confront the grim toll exacted by drive-bys--a term now so ingrained in Los Angeles' lexicon that the show's title needs no explanation. This week, Hawkins' mission took on even greater urgency.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1992
How much more talent does Jim Harrick need to get UCLA to the Final Four? Lackluster performance in must-win situations is becoming a Harrick trademark. The school's patience with his coaching ability must be wearing thin. And Mr. Harrick wants comparable compensation? If anything, UCLA should be demanding a rebate. CHARLES SARTORIUS Irvine
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1997 | MIMI KO CRUZ
Police will star in a new cable television program aimed at educating the public about crime prevention starting today. The half-hour program, called "Street Beat," will be produced by the Police Department and will be shown for the first time at 5:30 p.m. on Channel 53. It will be reshown throughout the upcoming weeks at various hours. The first episode will deal with domestic abuse. Officers will offer information that could be helpful to families dealing with the issue, police said.
NEWS
June 27, 1996 | JESSE KATZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Darrell Flinn's message is hateful and racist, a rhetorical sewer of Old South, white supremacist, Ku Klux Klan ideology. To the dismay of black residents, it's broadcast live every other Sunday night on Lafayette's public-access cable TV channel--an hour of hooded robes, Confederate flags and burning crosses. Flinn, Imperial Wizard of the Knights of the White Kamellia, considers his show a paragon of 1st Amendment rights, exactly the sort of unpopular speech a true democracy must tolerate.
NEWS
May 8, 1996 | ELEANOR RANDOLPH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The lead news story on Channel 75 was about the Jelly Bean--a tiny shop near the high school where a clerk had been caught selling cigarettes to a minor. On the screen, the young merchant could be seen trying to explain why he hadn't asked the girl for an ID, a mistake that had earned him a citation from the police. "She looked old enough," he said sourly before turning his face away from the camera.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1996 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A long-debated proposal to publish and televise the photos and names of men arrested for soliciting prostitutes hit a roadblock Monday when police told a Los Angeles City Council committee that they don't photograph every man who is arrested. The proposal, which Councilman Hal Bernson has supported for years, was also criticized by an assistant city attorney who said the city would face a "very, very, very substantial risk" of being sued if the wrong person is accused. Assistant City Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1995 | STEVE RYFLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Like other cities, Glendale has its share of would-be celebrities who host an array of offbeat programs in the netherlands of public access television--the difference is that they have to take their shows on the road. The local gurus of the alternative airwaves include a UFOlogist, a man who hosts a show on upper-class lifestyles, and a real estate broker who gives investment tips.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1995 | RUSS LOAR
Don't touch that dial. City Council members have delayed action on a request by Dimension Cable to switch the channel that carries local government meetings from Channel 3 to Channel 30. If government programming is switched to Channel 30, it will put City Council meetings in "the graveyard of the Dimension Cable hit list," Mayor Michael Ward said. "As long as I've lived in Irvine, Channel 3 has always been the station for City Council and school board meetings," Ward said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1993 | BERT ELJERA
Residents are circulating a petition demanding that the local cable television company restore 24-hour broadcasting of public affairs and other government-related issues. Donna McDonnalltold the City Council this week that Paragon Cable has "severely curtailed" C-Span 1 broadcasts since early this month. She said broadcast is now limited to a few hours a day, instead of 24 hours as in the past.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1993 | DOUGLAS ALGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
City officials are seeking volunteers to serve on a panel that will create rules governing Santa Clarita's controversial cable access channel. The Community Cable Channel Committee will look at policies and procedures used by other cable access channels in Southern California and use that information to establish guidelines for cable access programming, such as when the programs will air and what content will be permitted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1995 | STEVE RYFLE
A longstanding debate over whether the Glendale City Council should air its meetings on local cable television will finally come to an end Feb. 7, with the first live broadcast from City Hall. Video cameras have been installed inside the council chambers, and council members began practicing their on-the-air skills this week in a mock broadcast of Tuesday's council meeting.
NEWS
January 30, 1994 | MARTIN MILLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sometimes, it's more like watching "America's Funniest Home Videos" than the dignified proceedings of representative democracy. In Tustin, a speaker brandishing a stuffed rooster urged the City Council to lift a longstanding ban on live farm animals. In Newport Beach, a city official--who had tuned in at home--phoned in during a meeting to talk a colleague through technical difficulties he was experiencing with a council video presentation.
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