Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCommunity Service Programs
IN THE NEWS

Community Service Programs

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1990 | GEORGE FRANK
A new welfare office to serve poor and elderly residents in South County will open April 1 near La Paz Road and McIntyre Street. Financing the office became a priority in September after an attempt by county officials to close down the small welfare office in San Juan Capistrano caused a public outcry. Those opposing the closure said it would force the poor to make the long trip to the county welfare office in Costa Mesa. The San Juan Capistrano office was closed for less than a week.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
March 25, 2013 | By Gary Klein
USC's athletic department received a $5-million gift to endow its community service program and fund a coordinator's position that will be named in honor of former quarterback Matt Barkley, the school announced. The gift from the Otis Booth Foundation "will provide long-term funding for the program, which supports Trojan student-athletes' volunteer efforts to engage and inspire elementary age children in the neighborhoods surrounding USC," the school said in a release. Barkley, who will participate in a Pro Day workout for NFL scouts on Wednesday at USC, has been involved in local community service projects and also has traveled internationally on humanitarian trips.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1994 | MIMI KO
A group of teen-agers and a well-known local artist are using a Lemon Park block wall as the canvas for a mural to deter graffiti vandals. The wall had long been a popular "tagging" spot in Fullerton until last month, when the group began converting it into a mural titled "Children of the World," city officials said. "This painting is the heart of Fullerton and people will respect it," 16-year-old Daniel Rodriguez said as he painted an ocean on the wall Wednesday afternoon.
SPORTS
March 16, 2011 | Staff and wire reports
Former USC quarterback Mitch Mustain , who was arrested last month on suspicion of selling prescription narcotics, will not face misdemeanor charges if he completes a pre-file diversion program, a spokesman for the Los Angeles city attorney's office said Wednesday. Mustain, 23, must complete a drug-education program, perform 100 hours of community service and not be involved in another instance with police over the course of one year, city attorney spokesman Frank Mateljan said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1993 | BERT ELJERA
The city is reviving the tradition of free family movies on Friday nights at the park. From Friday through Aug. 8, full-length movies, including "Beauty and the Beast" and "Homeward Bound," will be shown on a 12-foot screen at the new Arovista Park Amphitheater. Families are encouraged to bring blankets and beach chairs. Kathie DeRobbio of the city's Cultural Arts Division said there will also be live entertainment on certain Fridays.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2001 | KARIMA A. HAYNES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A nonprofit organization that serves low-income families in the northeast San Fernando Valley launched a new program over the weekend that will provide social and educational activities for poor women and their children. The program, sponsored by MEND, or Meet Each Need with Dignity, a social service agency in Pacoima, is designed to bring relief to low-income, uneducated mothers who cannot afford to take their children to a movie, a museum or the bowling alley, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1993 | CARMEN VALENCIA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the second such incident this year, parks workers and officials have been accused of allowing convicts to avoid performing their full community service sentences, this time in the city of San Fernando. According to confidential memos obtained by The Times, "abuses have continued" since first reported internally in April, with "workers receiving credit for hours not worked." One city official confirmed that the alleged abuses are now under investigation by the district attorney's office.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1991 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There he was, telling the crowd at a benefit dedicated to helping dysfunctional families about his own fantasy of murdering his. The atmosphere at the UC Irvine Bren Events Center on Saturday night changed, as if a storm invaded a sunny day. Louie Anderson, that chubby dear of a comic known for his wise but usually benign observations, veered from the buoyant and bemused to the creepy and cathartic. "I used to think about killing my whole family.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1992 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Special Investigations Division of the district attorney's office confirmed Monday it is investigating two city of Los Angeles employees suspected of taking bribes from convicted offenders ordered to perform community service in city parks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1994 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A dozen public health clinics, youth sports leagues and job-training programs were guaranteed funding in next year's Los Angeles city budget, after an impassioned appeal Wednesday by Councilwoman Jackie Goldberg. Goldberg also led a successful campaign--on the third day of City Council deliberations of Mayor Richard Riordan's proposed budget--to demand continuation of a $1-million project that provides mentors for troubled young people.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2005 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Elena Valencia, who founded community service programs for homeless senior citizens, disabled athletes and single mothers, has died. She was 73. Valencia was hospitalized with pulmonary fibrosis at Marlinda Convalescent Hospital in Pasadena. She died there June 18, according to Corrine Cardiel, a close friend. In East Los Angeles, she was as well known for being Cha-Cha the Clown as she was for her volunteer work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2005 | Rachana Rathi, Times Staff Writer
An Orange County judge plans to open an outreach court to connect the homeless with mental health services, job training and legal counsel under one roof in hopes of saving money and reducing criminal recidivism. "We've been filling our prisons with the mentally ill, and that's not working.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
ChevronTexaco gave $1 million to a coalition of Latino community organizations Wednesday to help promote efforts promoting literacy and reduce high school dropout rates. The donation will be split between the Alliance for a Better Community and a Literacy Network/Urban League partnership.
NEWS
February 17, 2005 | Susan Carpenter, Times Staff Writer
They were like trees among shrubs -- three gargantuan Harlem Globetrotters standing waist deep in screaming schoolchildren, all of them holding out shoes and shirt sleeves for an autograph. The setting: An outdoor basketball court at Chatsworth's Sierra Canyon elementary school. The 'Trotters: "Clown Prince of Basketball" Geese Ausbie, "World's Fastest Dribbler" Curley Boo Johnson and Eugene "Edge" Edgerson, known as much for his Afro as his ball-handling skills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 2004 | Sandra Murillo, Times Staff Writer
Guadalupe Lopez and her teenage daughters are not homeless, but for the last week they've gathered their belongings and slept on the floor of a neighborhood community center in Pomona. The Lopezes and about 20 other families are protesting the closure of a place they consider their second home. "They can't get rid of us so easily," Lopez said. "This is the only way we'll get their attention."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 2004 | Erin Ailworth, Times Staff Writer
The door to apartment No. 3 popped open and kids spilled through with backpacks bumping and sneakers churning as they flew up the stairs or dashed through the living room. They don't live at 561 9th St. in Azusa, but the place has the feel of home and the children couldn't wait to start their homework. The apartment is Our Neighborhood Homework House, a Christian-based nonprofit tutoring organization located in the middle of the residential neighborhood it serves.
NEWS
July 22, 1990 | PAUL DEAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is penal service hiding behind coy euphemisms. Work release. Celebrity diversion. Special programs. They are, in essence, chain gangs without shackles. "I sentence a lot of people to work with Caltrans," said a Los Angeles municipal court commissioner. "Because it is hard work that in the heat of summer becomes hard labor."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1999 | Chris Ceballos, (949) 248-2155
The City Council recently approved $36,250 in grants for 25 community service programs this year. The grants range from $500 to $3,500 and were awarded to nonprofit agencies such as the Angels of Saddleback College, who help produce the summer civic light opera series, and the Dayle McIntosh Center for the Disabled. The city is accepting applications until April 1 for the remaining $11,250 in community service grants. Information: (949) 470-3000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An Oakland volunteer center that helped distribute government money to youth groups and community programs for 25 years will undergo a city audit over allegations that it misused public money. The Volunteer Center of Alameda County, which had offices in Oakland and Pleasanton, filed for bankruptcy in late December.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 2003 | Jennifer Mena, Times Staff Writer
The good news for Rose Espinoza's husband is that he can finally use his garage. Perhaps not as good for dozens of students in La Habra is that Rosie's Garage, a nationally recognized tutoring program, has moved from the humble home location where it began 12 years ago. After helping hundreds of children, the after-school homework-help program was moved out of her Corona Park neighborhood last week because of mounting concerns over the possibility of lawsuits and insurance liability.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|