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Community Service Programs

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September 17, 1989 | PAUL DEAN, Times Staff Writer
She used the syringe needle to explore her arms and legs for some space between the sores. An abscess glistened white and a friend diagnosed a common complication. Maggots. Then Morocco, a 57-year-old heroin addict, injected.
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December 21, 2004 | Elizabeth Mehren, Times Staff Writer
Until her first breakdown, Pat was trim and active, even playing on the volleyball team in college. But deep scars on her forearms attest to a lifetime of self-abuse. Pat, 53, grew sedentary, obese and reclusive. She said she has been hospitalized 25 times. "The sicker I got, and the more doped up I became, the more I tended to become isolated," she said. This year, Pat enrolled in a program here called In Shape, designed to provide regular structured exercise for people with mental illness.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1991 | LESLIE EARNEST
After two years of lean budgets and belt-tightening, a youth shelter held a mortgage-burning ceremony Tuesday to commemorate the final payment on a house where 300 youngsters and their families go for help each year. About 75 guests--including city officials, shelter volunteers, residents and schoolchildren--gathered during the afternoon at the CSP Youth Shelter, a two-story house on a quiet residential neighborhood near the ocean. County Supervisor Thomas F.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1994 | MIMI KO
About 15 children recently chanted " Si se puede! " meaning "Yes, it can be done!" during a picnic at Ralph B. Clark Regional Park. Their meaningful words brought attention to the way they feel about themselves. "You can do anything you want to do in your life," said Luis Torrez, 10. "I want to be a lawyer because I want to help people, and I know if I try I can do it, even if I don't have a lot of money."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1997 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After seven years of rushing to murder scenes, comforting grieving families, helping gang victims plead their cases in court and even burying the dead, Community Service Programs Inc. has been awarded the nation's highest honor for service to crime victims. Margot Carleson, executive director of the Gang Victim Service Program, and program supervisor Christine Lopez will receive a Crime Victim Service Award in Washington on Friday from Atty. Gen. Janet Reno.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1992 | DAVAN MAHARAJ and LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Women with broken bones, black eyes and bruises are walking into Orange County shelters, hospitals and courtrooms in record numbers this year to report physical abuse by their partners. Officials of an Irvine-based agency that assists victims of domestic violence handled 8,701 cases during a 10-month period ending May 31, 1992.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2001 | TINA BORGATTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The parents of a Laguna Hills teen who was severely beaten at a party in December 1999 have teamed up with a local counseling service to advise families how to keep youth get-togethers from running out of control. "It's not like we're trying to wipe out every teen party," said Greg Lerum, who in the year since his son Kris was assaulted has spoken to small parent groups and PTAs.
NEWS
October 23, 1994 | ENRIQUE LAVIN
For the third consecutive year, South-Central-based Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion has contributed $25,000 to nonprofit educational and community service programs in the area. Third-time recipients Hoover Intergenerational Center and the United Neighborhood Council, as well as Hope in Youth, Girls Inc., Central Recovery and Development Ministry and the National Conference of Christians and Jews benefited from the college's gifts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 2004 | Eric Slater, Times Staff Writer
To graduate from college, Tracy Burke spent time in a halfway house for female felons. Alicia Gregory filled grocery bags at a food bank. Tiana Trutna taught elementary students how to grow vegetables for their school cafeteria. Here at Cal State Monterey Bay, it's required work. To the university, it's an essential part of an education. But some educators elsewhere say required community service squanders precious education dollars -- and time.
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