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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1986 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, Times Urban Affairs Writer
Efforts to turn Beach Boulevard into a 19.5-mile "super street," develop a financing plan for widening the Santa Ana Freeway and install commuter lanes along the San Diego Freeway are key elements in the $2.18-million operating budget for 1986-87 adopted Monday by the Orange County Transportation Commission. The new budget represents a slight increase above this year's $2.15-million budget and includes higher maintenance, salary and professional service costs.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1986 | Times Staff writers Kim Murphy, Mark I. Pinsky and Bill Billiter compiled the Week in Review stories.
Just when you thought it was safe to drive on the Costa Mesa Freeway, a committee of drivers opposed to surrending two lanes of the freeway to buses and car pools produced a disturbing statistic: Accidents on the freeway have increased 77% since the new commuter lanes took effect in November.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1986
I just love the Southern California mentality that car-pool lanes are detrimental to easing the basin's traffic problem. It is sickening to read all of the criticism. These people are part of the selfish group that wants to drive by themselves so they can get to work one minute before starting time and leave 30 seconds after the end-of-the-day whistle blows. I ride in a car pool, driving several miles out of my way to save on gas and reduce exhaust emissions from my automobile.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1986 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
Responding to complaints that yellow striping does not keep motorists from illegally crossing into commuter lanes on the Costa Mesa Freeway, Caltrans officials said Monday that they will try blue striping, nine-inch pylons and reflector dots along parts of the freeway to see if they help.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1986 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
Alarmed at the potential for collisions on the new Costa Mesa Freeway commuter lanes, a group of regular freeway travelers has begun a campaign to persuade county officials to open the lanes to regular traffic. Frustrated motorists crawling in 20-m.p.h. traffic directly adjacent to commuters whizzing by at up to 60 add up to "a very dangerous situation" for all motorists using the freeway, said Joe C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1985 | Kim Murphy
Commuters on the Costa Mesa Freeway are getting to work in nearly half the time, even those who are not using the new commuter lanes, according to Caltrans figures released Monday. An analysis of the first three weeks' use of the new lanes, restricted to cars with two or more occupants, shows that drivers in the regular lanes are spending an average of 21 minutes on the 11.7 miles between the Riverside and San Diego freeways.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1985
In response to your article, "Drivers Praise Life in the Express Lane" (Nov. 19), I wish to express my concerns regarding the safety of this commuter lane. I have experienced a shortened transportation time than prior to the express lane. However, I have seen several single-occupant vehicles abusing the express lane. And due to the limited exits from the express lane, I have seen numerous vehicles unsafely exiting the lane in non-designated areas, creating unsafe conditions for motorists in the second lane of the highway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1985
When motorists drive onto the Costa Mesa Freeway (California 55) Monday morning they will find the new express lanes open for use--open, that is, for vehicles with at least two occupants. It's a welcome innovation in Orange County freeway driving that motorists should waste little time using. The new commuter lanes, one each running north and south for 12 miles between the Riverside (California 91) and San Diego (Interstate 405) freeways, is an historic first in Orange County.
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