Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCompanies
IN THE NEWS

Companies

ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2014 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
The only thing better than one Kermit is two. And the only thing better than two Kermits is one with a Russian accent. Throw Tina Fey into a gulag, force Ricky Gervais to play second fiddle to a nefarious frog, stick Ray Liotta in a chorus line and you have a sense of the zany extremes to be found in "Muppets Most Wanted. " After the magically nostalgic return of the fuzzy-wuzzies to the big screen in 2011's "The Muppets," it's natural to think of "Most Wanted" as a sequel. Don't.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
March 19, 2014 | By Shan Li
Texas Gov. Rick Perry says that his swings through California to poach businesses work. As proof, Perry said Wednesday that California companies had created about 14,000 new jobs in Texas over the last two years. These Golden State companies, which number 60 in all, have expanded, relocated or moved jobs to Texas, Perry said. Eleven of the businesses have relocated their headquarters to the Lone Star State, including longtime Los Angeles-based Occidental Petroleum. PHOTOS: World's most expensive cities "As states continue to compete for jobs and investment, it's clear the formula for this success exists in red states," Perry said in a Wednesday statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2014 | By Daniel Miller
Walt Disney Co. held its annual meeting in Portland, Ore., on Tuesday and used the occasion to reveal a few tidbits about its forthcoming film projects, including a pair of animated sequels and the company's first "Star Wars" picture. Shareholders of Disney, the world's largest entertainment company, also confirmed all 10 members of the board of directors who were up for reelection. The meeting was also notable for what did not transpire there. The Burbank company was able to avoid a vote on a proposal put forward by a group of activist investors who wanted to amend the process by which candidates are nominated to the board.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2014 | By Kim Christensen
Scores of small businesses burned in a payroll-tax scam got some welcome news late last week when an insurance company said it would cover $3 million of their total losses. "We won't get all of our money back, but at least it looks like we will get a good chunk," said Melissa Meltzer, who with her husband, Robert, owns a Los Angeles children's fitness franchise that lost about $55,000. The Meltzers are among about 150 mostly Southern California restaurateurs, dentists, hairstylists and others who learned around Christmas that money they had deposited with LA Payroll for state and federal taxes had disappeared - as had the company's owner, Tovmas Grigoryan.
BUSINESS
March 17, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Silicon Valley is wrestling with yet more damaging allegations of harassment and sexism as a prominent engineer accuses her company of creating a hostile work environment that led to her resignation. Julie Ann Horvath, who was a developer with GitHub, made the allegations public on Twitter and in an interview with technology blog TechCrunch over the weekend. GitHub, which has raised $100 million in funding, said Sunday night that it would conduct an investigation into Horvath's claims.
BUSINESS
March 17, 2014 | David Lazarus
Time Warner Cable has assured customers that the company's $45-billion acquisition by Comcast will improve service and innovation. Customers might wonder how the pairing of two profit-hungry cable giants will remedy the biggest problem: ever-increasing monthly bills. Time Warner Cable has just sent out notices of its latest rate hikes, which take effect with the next bill. As usual, the company says higher prices were unavoidable. On the one hand, it says, "the rates that TV networks and programming providers are charging us to deliver your favorite channels have risen to new highs.
BUSINESS
March 16, 2014 | By Hannah Kuchler
Like bacteria, big data are lurking in the stomachs of cows. Some farmers are using sensors and software to analyze it and predict when a cow is getting ill. Just like customers, cows do not always speak out when something is wrong. But companies can use data to predict potential risks and opportunities in cows and customers alike. The message of a new book, "Big Data @Work," by Thomas H. Davenport, a fellow of the MIT Center for Digital Business, is that companies are only beginning to understand the questions they can ask of their vast stores of data - and how to build the internal structures to make the most of it. "Big data" is a fashionable, sometimes overused term for the vast amounts of information that can now be stored because of the growth of online activity and the low cost of storage.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2014 | By Joseph Carman
NEW YORK - In "Banquet of Vultures," veteran Paul Taylor Dance Company member Michael Trusnovec, dressed in a crisp black suit with a red power tie, yanks his bent knee toward his ear, conjuring up a bird of prey as he steps shrewdly through a mass of bodies. As he unfolds his talon-like hands, he evokes both a predator and a profiteer. Hands on hips, elbows splayed wide, he thrusts his leg back and swivels around a woman holding a candle, then tosses her overhead and onto the floor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2014 | By Jessica Garrison and Kim Christensen
A Northern California metal-plating business and its owner were charged Thursday with felony violations of state hazardous waste laws, including storing cyanide near acid in a way that could have triggered a deadly accident. Electro-Forming Co. and Marion Ingrid Patigler face 11 felony counts and 12 misdemeanor charges related to the alleged illegal disposal, storage, treatment and transportation of hazardous waste. The alleged crimes - which include storing cyanide and other toxic substances in an unpermitted, 6,900-gallon tank at the Richmond site - occurred over a two-year period beginning in March 2011, according to a criminal complaint filed by the Contra Costa County district attorney's office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2014 | By Dan Weikel
An airline services company at Los Angeles International Airport has won a court victory in a longstanding battle with a labor union fighting to regain its representation of the firm's workers. Aviation Safeguards announced Thursday that U.S. District Judge Stephen Wilson threw out a lawsuit filed in July 2012 by several company workers and United Service Workers West, a local of the Service Employees International Union. The case accused company managers of coercing their employees' choice of union representation before a majority of workers voted to terminate an SEIU contract in December 2011.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|