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BUSINESS
November 9, 2013 | By Greg Braxton and Meg James
Television has a split image: one by day and another by night. In the daytime, blacks and other people of color are a prominent presence, hosting popular talk shows and playing juicy roles in soap operas. But at night, minorities are largely sidelined, with white performers holding most of the marquee roles. The industry's Jekyll-and-Hyde approach to diversity is underscored by the controversy engulfing NBC's "Saturday Night Live. " The sketch comedy series came under fire from within its own ranks and from outside observers who decried the show's long-standing lack of ethnic diversity.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2014 | By Meg James
For Maria Bartiromo, it was time to take stock. "Sometimes in life you have to have a little courage," the longtime star of business channel CNBC said over the phone. "I wanted to try something new, something in which I could learn and grow. " After 20 years, Bartiromo gave up her comfortable perch at CNBC and moved to rival Fox Business Network, where on Monday she debuts a live, two-hour morning show, "Opening Bell With Maria Bartiromo. " PHOTOS: Behind the scenes of movies and TV CNBC may have nearly three times the audience of Fox Business, but her defection is a big loss.
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BUSINESS
March 24, 1995
We'd like to hear your comments about Company Town and suggestions for entertainment industry stories. We regret that we can't always respond to individual queries. From time to time, we will seek your comments about specific subjects and publish some responses. This week, we'd like to hear your thoughts about the joint interactive venture by Microsoft and DreamWorks SKG, as well as the $500-million investment by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen in DreamWorks.
BUSINESS
November 16, 2013 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
The online video site Hulu once had ambitions of ushering in the future of television by shaking up the status quo. But under its new management, the site will throw off its old mantle of TV disrupter as it seeks to work in partnership with cable and satellite companies. Veteran Fox television executive Mike Hopkins took over as chief executive less than a month ago, an appointment that signaled the media companies that control Hulu wanted to turn the popular service into a feature offered through pay-TV distributors.
BUSINESS
September 17, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
Despite the growth of Netflix, Amazon.com and other legal channels for watching entertainment online, the volume of pirated movies, TV shows, music, books and video games online continues to grow at a rapid pace. The amount of bandwidth used for copyright infringement in North America, Europe and Asia Pacific has grown nearly 160% from 2010 to 2012, accounting for 24% of total Internet bandwidth, according to a study from NetNames, the British brand protection firm. At the same time, the number of people engaged in copyright infringement has grown dramatically too. In January2013, 327 million unique users illegally sought copyrighted content, generating 14 billion page views on websites focused on piracy, up 10% from November 2011, according to the report.
BUSINESS
December 6, 1994 | ALAN CITRON
Hollywood's favorite movie title these days isn't "The Santa Clause" or "Interview With the Vampire," despite their box office success. Insiders say it's more like "The Great Escape." Industry executives looking to get out from under their oppressive workloads are taking longer and more frequent vacations than at any time in recent memory, sources say. One studio is holding its Christmas party two weeks earlier this year than last.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
It's not enough these days to wonder what to watch on your TV; a growing question for many is how to watch. Just like any device in your life, TVs can now connect to the Internet. This lets you grab shows from the Internet and watch content whenever you want. Most new TVs come with the ability to connect to the Internet, but there are a number of ways to easily turn an existing TV into a so-called smart TV. Here's a primer. The simplest way to do so is to connect a TV to a laptop or computer using either a VGA or HDMI cable.
BUSINESS
October 22, 2013 | By Daniel Miller
Whimsic Alley calls itself "a shopping haven for wizards of distinction," catering to "Harry Potter" fans with merchandise that includes wands, books, neckties and sweater vests for those looking to re-create the boy wizard's look. It even has a Hogwarts-style "Great Hall" that can be rented out for children's birthday parties and is reminiscent of a hall of the same name in the "Harry Potter" series' fictional boarding school for wizards. Now the Miracle Mile shop is the target of a lawsuit filed by Warner Bros., distributor of the "Harry Potter" movies and since 1998 the owner of the bulk of the "Potter" trademarks.
BUSINESS
May 16, 2013 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
Cinemark Holdings Inc., the nation's third-largest theater chain, is bulking up in Los Angeles County with plans to open a multiplex at the SouthBay Pavilion shopping mall in Carson. Vintage Real Estate, which owns and manages SouthBay Pavilion, said it had recently signed a lease with Cinemark to bring a 14-screen theater to the mall. Set to open in December 2014, the multiplex will be among the highest-profile locations for Cinemark in the Los Angeles region. PHOTOS: Celebrities by The Times The Plano, Texas, circuit, which has 5,259 movie screens in the U.S. and Latin America, already has a dozen cinemas in the Los Angeles area and is expanding its footprint in Southern California.
BUSINESS
December 12, 2012 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
The director watches a monitor as an actor rushes down a staircase into a basement wine cellar, searching among the racks of bottles for his childhood crush. The wine cellar is actually a plywood set on the ground floor of a converted Northridge warehouse, one of several newly constructed sets where the MTV series "Teen Wolf" recently began filming its third season after moving from Georgia. "Teen Wolf" is a rarity - a show that relocated to Los Angeles from elsewhere to take advantage of California's film and TV tax credit program since it took effect in 2009.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
When music mogul Sean "Diddy" Combs launched his television channel last month, he did so with a shout-out to hip-hop history. Standing in front of the childhood home of the late hip-hop legend Notorious B.I.G., Combs introduced Revolt TV, a 24-hour music video and news channel in the vein of MTV's early days, before it became a reality TV hub. "To all the dreamers out there, all the believers out there, all the people that want a change in...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
First there was the Boy Scouts' "Respect Copyrights" activity patch, backed by the Motion Picture Assn. of America. Then there was "Crime-Fighting Canines," a weekly anti-piracy comic strip series for children in which two black Labrador retrievers named Lucky and Flo sniffed out bootleg DVDs. The series was part of a school education campaign led by the MPAA. Now that group, along with the Recording Industry Assn. of America and the nation's main Internet service providers, is quietly backing another controversial push to educate schoolchildren about the evils of piracy.
BUSINESS
November 9, 2013 | By Greg Braxton and Meg James
Television has a split image: one by day and another by night. In the daytime, blacks and other people of color are a prominent presence, hosting popular talk shows and playing juicy roles in soap operas. But at night, minorities are largely sidelined, with white performers holding most of the marquee roles. The industry's Jekyll-and-Hyde approach to diversity is underscored by the controversy engulfing NBC's "Saturday Night Live. " The sketch comedy series came under fire from within its own ranks and from outside observers who decried the show's long-standing lack of ethnic diversity.
BUSINESS
November 8, 2013 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
Microsoft Corp., looking to build anticipation for the new Xbox One video game console, emphasized the entertainment features of the device. The struggling Seattle technology giant has been positioning the successor to its Xbox 360 as an all-in-one entertainment system that will enable users to quickly switch from playing games to watching television to listening to music - and back again - by using their voice. "One of the goals we have for Xbox One is for it to be the games and entertainment system for people in their homes," Xbox Marketing Director Jose Pinero said as he demonstrated the new features this week in Venice.  ON LOCATION: Where the cameras roll The Xbox One - scheduled to come out Nov. 22 - seeks to improve on the cumbersome electronic program guides and remote controls that people use to make viewing selections with a new type of navigation.  The Kinect controller recognizes a user when he or she enters the room, and it automatically fills the screen with that person's favorite channels, applications or games.
BUSINESS
November 8, 2013 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
Netflix is bulking up its programming with a roster of new Marvel superheroes. The online movie and television service struck a deal with Walt Disney Co. to develop original live-action TV series based on four of Marvel's lesser-known comic book characters: Daredevil, Jessica Jones, Iron Fist and Luke Cage. The first of four serialized programs and a miniseries will appear on Netflix in 2015. The deal announced Thursday affords Disney's Marvel Television unit the opportunity to develop stories and build audiences for these below-the-radar heroes, without the added scrutiny of daily Nielsen TV ratings or weekend ticket-sale tallies.
BUSINESS
November 6, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
The coming of age of horror cinema in Thailand might seem like an odd subject for the Princess of Thailand to address. But it was Halloween night, after all, and Princess Ubolratana Rajakanya had good reason to single out the Southeast Asian nation's growing reputation as a hub for slasher, horror and monster films. The princess was leading a delegation of Thai officials, including the country's deputy prime minister and minister of commerce, in their first Los Angeles "road show" to promote the country's resources, talent and desirability as a film location.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2013 | By Meg James, Los Angeles Times
The star of this reality show is a Mexican immigrant who carries pink handcuffs. The bounty hunter show "Fugitivos de la Ley: Los Angeles" boasts a cast that includes two real-life federal agents and a fireplug of a man, a former U.S. Marine from Riverside. There's also a 29-year-old firefighter who grew up in Pacoima and is nicknamed "Bombero" - Spanish for fireman - and a German shepherd named Cooper. "Fugitivos" is an attempt by the small bilingual cable channel Mun2 to boost its profile by tapping into the richness of L.A.'s Latino population to find compelling characters and stories.
BUSINESS
November 5, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik and Dawn C. Chmielewski
Can "The Square" put Netflix in Oscar circles? That's one of several questions raised by the company's decision to move into original documentaries with "The Square," filmmaker Jehane Noujaim's nonfiction feature about the Egyptian revolution. On Monday, Netflix announced it had acquired rights to the political film, which centers on real-life protesters in Cairo's Tahrir Square. The movie is considered a frontrunner in the upcoming Academy Award race for best documentary, having won a coveted audience award at the Sundance Film Festival in January and another audience prize at the Toronto International Film Festival in September.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
Los Angeles didn't get chosen as the location for the latest "Fast & Furious" movie, but it did land the spoof version of the popular car chasing franchise. The actual "Fast & Furious 7" has been filming in Atlanta to tap into Georgia's 30% tax credit, though some filming is expected to occur in L.A. But "SuperFast," a parody of Universal's "Fast and Furious" films, began filming in Vernon, south of downtown, last week. The independently produced movie comes from writer-directors Aaron Seltzer and Jason Friedberg, known for the "Scary Movie" films and for parodies of "Twilight" with their satiric "Vampires Suck" and the historical epic "300" with their comical "Meet the Spartans.
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