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SPORTS
October 23, 1998 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Olympic sprint champion Florence Griffith Joyner died after suffering an epileptic seizure, according to autopsy results released Thursday, and her family and friends say they hope the findings will put to rest rumors that drug use contributed to her death. Griffith Joyner died last month in her sleep at age 38. Her husband, Al Joyner, bitterly criticized those who suggested that she took performance-enhancing drugs.
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BUSINESS
April 25, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan
Elon Musk, founder and chief executive of Hawthorne rocket maker SpaceX, hastily called a news conference Friday in Washington, D.C., where he outlined an array of matters confronting his upstart company. A cryptic email was sent to media around 9 p.m. Pacific time Thursday that said he would "make an important SpaceX announcement" the next day at the National Press Club. The big announcement, however, wasn't quite clear. Musk made several revelations during the half-hour event. First, he provided an update on SpaceX's goal of creating the world's first fully reusable rocket - the holy grail in rocketry.
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SPORTS
January 21, 1992 | THERESA MUNOZ
The fastest 50-meter freestyle swimmers in the world last year were Americans Matt Biondi, Tom Jager and Steve Crocker. But only two of them will advance from the Olympic trials, March 1-6 in Indianapolis, to the Olympic Games, starting July 25 in Barcelona, Spain. In response to U.S. swimming dominance, FINA, the world governing body of the sport, decreased the number of entrants allowed each country from three per event to two in 1980. Other international meets followed suit.
OPINION
April 24, 2014 | Times Editorial Board
Eager to preserve the Internet's openness but not to be rebuked again by the courts, the Federal Communications Commission is crafting yet another set of "Net neutrality" rules to limit broadband providers' control over the data traveling through their networks. The tentative proposal unveiled Thursday seems more permissive than the rules a federal appeals panel rejected in January, prompting some critics to warn that Internet service providers will rush to create "toll lanes," giving preference to some content providers and moving their data faster to end-users.
BUSINESS
May 12, 1992 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
J. D. Power & Associates in Agoura Hills is nearly synonymous with car research, which Power has earned by publishing customer-satisfaction surveys and other analyses for the world's auto makers for more than a decade. But that isn't stopping AutoPacific Group Inc. of Santa Ana from trying to muscle in on parts of Power's business.
SPORTS
February 12, 1987
Even though UCLA and Michigan recruited Jim Bonds of Hart and Ken Sollom of Canyon heavily, neither of the quarterbacks will sleep walk his way to the starting spot. Newcomers contesting for the Wolverines' quarterback position vacated by graduating Jim Harbaugh, are highly recruited Eric Bush of Quincy, Ill., Wilbur Odom of San Antonio, Texas, and Sollom. Besides Bonds, Bobby San Jose, from Long Beach Wilson High and Troy Aikman, a transfer from Oklahoma, will compete for the UCLA spot.
NEWS
August 27, 2013 | By Nika Soon-Shiong
  Missy Lynn, an active-duty member of the United States Air Force and freelance makeup artist, won the NYX Fine Artistry of Cosmetic Elites (FACE) Awards competition on Saturday, beating out 1,000 other online beauty gurus for the title of Beauty Vlogger of the Year. The 23-year-old Louisiana native submitted this video, showing how to create a beautiful alien face worthy of a feature film, to earn her place among the six finalists.  And then she came out on top in the final, live challenge during the BeautyCon convention in Los Angeles.
NEWS
August 5, 2013 | By Jay Jones
Women paddlers from around the world will celebrate 40 years of inclusion in the Queen Liliuokalani Outrigger Canoe Races when they return to the Big Island's Kona Coast on Aug. 31. It was in 1973 that wahine ("women" in Hawaiian) first participated in the long-distance competition . Back then, it was a six-mile race. It has since expanded to 18 miles between Kailua and Honaunau.  “We knew we could do it,” Blondie Kamaka, one of the pioneering members of the Kai Opua Canoe Club  crew, said in a news release.
BUSINESS
July 24, 2012 | By William D'Urso
Someone, let the lollipop guild know. See's Candies now owns the Guinness World Records title for the largest lollipop. The company constructed the behemoth in its See's Candies Lollypop Factory (yes, See's spells it with a 'y') in Burlingame on July 18. The chocolate flavored confectionary collossus weighs in at 7,003 pounds and is 4 feet 8.75 inches in length, 3 feet 6 inches in width and 5 feet 11 inches in height. With the stick, the lollipop is nearly 12 feet long.  See's Candies is owned by Berkshire Hathaway Inc., which bought the company from the See family in 1972.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2014 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
British architect David Chipperfield has won a high-profile competition to design a home for the Nobel Foundation in Sweden. His proposal, on which he collaborated with his partner Christoph Felger, calls for a light-on-its-feet building overlooking the water on the Blasieholmen peninsula in central Stockholm with a largely transparent facade and brass detailing. It prevailed over finalists Johan Celsing and Gert Wingardh, both Swedish architects. An earlier round in the competition included proposals from firms including Snøhetta , Japan's SANAA and OMA, the Dutch firm led by Rem Koolhaas.
SPORTS
April 24, 2014 | By David Wharton
MESA, Ariz. - A buzz ran through the crowd, an accumulation of murmurs and applause that drifted across the pool to where Michael Phelps stood. It was just loud enough to make the swimmer grin as he stepped onto the block. "You heard people starting to get excited," he said. The 1,200 spectators at poolside weren't alone - an entire sport watched intently as the most-decorated athlete in Olympic history began his comeback from retirement this week. With an unprecedented 22 medals from three Games, Phelps is the Michael Jordan of swimming.
AUTOS
April 19, 2014 | By Jerry Hirsch
The battle for buyers of family sedans - already the most competitive U.S. auto segment - will heat up this fall when Toyota and Hyundai launch dramatically restyled versions of their respective offerings, the Camry and the Sonata. A decade ago, the default choices in this biggest slice of the auto market were the Camry and Honda's Accord, but the competition has grown fierce in the last five years. Automakers can't afford a misstep with a new model, and they can't fall behind with a dated model.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2014 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
British architect David Chipperfield has won a high-profile competition to design a home for the Nobel Foundation in Sweden. His proposal, on which he collaborated with his partner Christoph Felger, calls for a light-on-its-feet building overlooking the water on the Blasieholmen peninsula in central Stockholm with a largely transparent facade and brass detailing. It prevailed over finalists Johan Celsing and Gert Wingardh, both Swedish architects. An earlier round in the competition included proposals from firms including Snøhetta , Japan's SANAA and OMA, the Dutch firm led by Rem Koolhaas.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2014 | By Joe Flint and Meg James
Comcast Corp., already the nation's largest cable and Internet provider, says it needs to get bigger to compete against the formidable giants of Silicon Valley. The Philadelphia-based cable behemoth said in a government filing Tuesday that its proposed $40-billion acquisition of Time Warner Cable Inc. will benefit consumers without limiting competition. Both companies contend that they need muscle to compete against emerging competition from Google Inc., Apple Inc., Netflix Inc. and Amazon.com Inc. Comcast said in a 175-page document filed with the Federal Communications Commission that the deal would mean better Internet and cable TV service for millions of consumers.
SPORTS
April 5, 2014 | By Chris Foster
The entire starting secondary returns for UCLA. And none of those guys should get comfortable. If there is one area where the Bruins have an overabundance of talent, it's at defensive back. By fall, they will have 14 scholarship players in the secondary. "That's always good," said safety Randall Goforth . "We were limited in numbers last season. It was pretty tough. Now we got more people here and more experience. It's less teaching and more evolving. I like it. " But that comes with a warning, and Goforth knows it. "You better compete for your job every day," he said.
SPORTS
April 3, 2014 | By Gary Klein
As USC reached the midway point of spring workouts Thursday, Coach Steve Sarkisian decided to shake things up. About an hour into the Trojans' eighth practice, players gathered in an end zone at Brian Kennedy-Howard Jones Field for a competitive one-on-one drill. A dance contest. Players whooped and hollered as teammates squared off in the surprise competition as music blared from sideline speakers. "Guys have some moves and some guys don't," Sarkisian said. "I think some guys might listen to country music.
NEWS
August 9, 2013 | By Jay Jones
Cocktail connoisseurs will converge on the Big Island on Aug. 17 in search of the best mai tai at a Big Island festival devoted to the drink. The mai tai - a rum-based, coconut and pineapple-flavored drink - is an island favorite. About 20 mixologists from around the world will be blending their recipes at the Don the Beachcomber Mai Tai Festival as they seek the top prize of $10,000. The mix-off will be from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m at the Royal Kona Resort . The panel of celebrity judges includes Philip “Ippy” Alona , a local restaurateur and competitor on Food Network's “ Chopped ”; hockey player T.J. Gorence of the Philadelphia Flyers ; and Mark Nigbur, master distiller for Sammy's Beach Bar Rum , which is produced on Maui.
BUSINESS
December 22, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
Conventional wisdom says that when competition increases, prices go down. In the airline industry, something unexpected also happens when a low-cost carrier enters a market to challenge big network airlines. According to a new study from Indiana University's Kelley School of Business, increased competition from low-cost airlines seems to lower the on-time performance of the big airlines. “As much as more competition means lower prices, it is not as clear that the same is true with quality,” said Jeff Prince, co-author of the report and associate professor of business economics at the school.
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