Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsComplaint
IN THE NEWS

Complaint

SPORTS
February 26, 2014 | By Mike Bresnahan
MEMPHIS, Tenn. -- Welcome to the Lakers. Enjoy the crossfire. Newcomers Kent Bazemore and MarShon Brooks went all of six days before the latest Lakers drama unfolded, indirectly bringing them into the battle of words between Pau Gasol and Lakers Coach Mike D'Antoni . Bazemore's take since being traded to the Lakers? Whoa. "It's been a long season, especially for them," he said. "They've been probably doing this all year. I don't get caught up in that stuff.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2014 | By Jason Felch and Jason Song, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
Thirty-one current and former UC Berkeley students filed two federal complaints against the university Wednesday alleging a decades-long pattern of mishandling sexual assault investigations by campus administrators. The complaints allege that officials for years have discouraged victims from reporting assaults, failed to inform them of their rights and led a biased judicial process that favored assailants' rights over those of their victims. The reports were filed with the U.S. Department of Education, which investigates violations of Title IX, the federal anti-discrimination law, and the Clery Act, a federal law that requires campuses to accurately report incidents of serious crimes, including sexual assault.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2014 | By Jason Felch
Thirty-one current and former UC Berkeley students filed two federal complaints against the university Wednesday alleging a decades-long pattern of mishandling sexual assault investigations by campus administrators. The complaints allege that officials for years have discouraged victims from reporting assaults, failed to inform them of their rights and led a biased judicial process that favored assailants' rights over those of their victims. The reports were filed with the U.S. Department of Education, which investigates violations of Title IX, the federal anti-discrimination law, and the Clery Act, a federal law that requires campuses to accurately report incidents of serious crimes, including sexual assault.
BUSINESS
February 21, 2014 | David Lazarus
Maybe Capital One should take a course in remedial English. The credit card issuer seems to be having a tough time communicating relatively simple ideas. Betty Rome, for example, would be thousands of dollars wealthier now had Cap One expressed itself clearly. Instead, she says, the company spent months trying to trick her into opening an account she didn't want. Yet that corporate misdirection pales in comparison to the Cap One contract update I wrote about Tuesday. The company recently informed its millions of cardholders that "we may contact you in any manner we choose," including a "personal visit" to your home or workplace.
SPORTS
February 20, 2014 | Sam Farmer
INDIANAPOLIS - A scant three weeks into the off-season, the NFL is dealing with three public relations infernos, two involving current players. There's the Miami Dolphins bullying saga, chronicled in a just-released investigation that pulled back the curtain on the team's toxic locker room culture. The Dolphins have fired their offensive line coach and longtime trainer, and player suspensions could be in the works. There's the arrest of retired Pro Bowl safety Darren Sharper, most recently an NFL Network analyst, on charges that he drugged and raped two women.
SPORTS
February 14, 2014
Bill Plaschke's Feb. 13 article about disappointing Olympic performances should never have been printed. Has he ever competed for or received an Olympic medal? Our fabulous, hard-working athletes have spent their lives achieving a spot on the US Olympic Team. They deserve better than Plaschke's ridicule. After putting so much effort in their events, we know their hearts are broken, which happens by mere fractions of a second. They are our heroes and should be lauded as such! Joann Duray Playa del Rey :: I find it disgusting that Bill Plaschke called Shaun White "the biggest loser of all" in his Olympics rant.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2014 | By Jerry Hirsch
After years of improving car reliability, automakers have shifted into reverse while attempting to exact better fuel economy and add in-dash technology, J.D. Power & Associates reported in its 2014 U.S. Vehicle Dependability Study. Owners of 3-year-old vehicles reported more problems than in the same study from the prior year, the automotive research firm said Wednesday. It was the first increase in problems reported since 1998. The slip in quality might be the first sign in a trend toward declining reliability in cars, according to the firm, whose research identified transmissions and infotainment systems as key trouble spots.
BUSINESS
February 11, 2014 | By Hugo Martin
Complaints filed by air travelers about commercial airlines dropped by 14% in 2013, compared to the previous year, according to federal statistics released Tuesday. During last year, airline passengers filed 13,168 complaints with the U.S. Department of Transportation, down from the 15,338 complaints filed in 2012, according to the federal agency. The decline came despite a drop in the overall on-time performance by the nation's largest carriers. In 2013, the carriers reported a 78% on-time arrival rate, down from 82% in 2012, according to federal data.
SPORTS
February 10, 2014 | By Lisa Dillman
SOCHI, Russia - Improvements were made to the much-maligned halfpipe at Rosa Khutor Extreme Park but not enough to satisfy the leading Olympic snowboarders. The high-profile extreme sports stars had extreme reactions after a practice session scheduled for earlier in the day was moved to Monday night with the hope that conditions would improve. Sloppy snow and edgy riders were not an ideal combination. The men's event starts Tuesday and the women's on Wednesday. FRAMEWORK: Best images from the Sochi Olympics Two-time gold-medal winner Shaun White said that he had a "frustrating" practice.
BUSINESS
February 10, 2014 | By Jerry Hirsch
Here's how Toyota Motor Corp. plans to finally put the sudden-acceleration issue to rest: Pull out the checkbook. The automaker is reportedly close to paying a $1-billion fine to settle a four-year federal criminal investigation into whether it properly reported safety complaints to regulators. Meanwhile, Toyota's lawyers are in settlement talks over hundreds of civil lawsuits alleging wrongful deaths or injuries, potentially adding hundreds of millions to the tab. Previously, Toyota agreed to pay $1.6 billion to settle a class-action case brought by thousands of Toyota owners who contended that sudden-acceleration problems damaged the value of their vehicles.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|