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BUSINESS
January 19, 2014 | Michael Hiltzik
The big television networks have faced all number of challenges in recent years. But they could be done in by something called Aereo. Most people probably haven't heard of Aereo, which has been rolling out its video service for just over a year and still serves only 10 cities, none further west than Salt Lake. But millions will be hearing about it now, because on Jan. 10, the Supreme Court agreed to hear the broadcasters' complaints that Aereo's business dramatically breaches telecommunications and copyright law. The New York start-up offers its subscribers signals from their local over-the-air broadcasters in a way that is either a minor tweak of how they can get those signals on their own (that's Aereo's version)
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NATIONAL
December 30, 2013 | By David S. Cloud
TRAVIS AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. - Shortly after he arrived at Ramstein Air Base in Germany in March 2012, Air Force security guard Trent Smith was at an off-base apartment when, he says, a male sergeant touched him and pressed him to go into the bedroom for sex. "I said, 'No, I don't want to spend the night,'" Smith recalled. But Smith, 20, says he felt he had no choice. "I went along with it. " For Smith, the encounter - which he reported up the chain of command three days later - began an emotional ordeal.
SPORTS
December 13, 2013 | By Mike Bresnahan
OKLAHOMA CITY -- Every once in a while, Pau Gasol complains about not getting enough touches in the post. Lakers Coach Mike D'Antoni had a suggestion for him -- and any other Lakers player who didn't like their role in his offense. "Everybody, to a man, we've just got to play harder and worry about things less," he said Friday. "That's one thing, if they just don't want to do it that way. Then you have to accept it or not. But there's no reason to not play hard. " Gasol told the Los Angeles Times on Thursday that his poor play on the court -- averages of 14.4 points a game, 41.4% shooting -- was a result of being underutilized.
NATIONAL
December 3, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - Rabbi S. Binyomin Ginsberg of Minneapolis admits being both a frequent flier and a frequent complainer. He flew on Northwest Airlines about 75 times a year, domestically and internationally, earning enough miles to qualify for "Platinum Elite" status. But he also complained a lot - about two dozen times in seven months, the airline says - demanding compensation for delays, lost bags and losing seats on overbooked flights that Northwest said the rabbi had reserved "with the purpose of being bumped.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
Operators of a controversial urban oil field in South Los Angeles voluntarily agreed Friday to halt operations pending completion of investigations prompted by complaints from neighbors, who blame noxious vapors for persistent respiratory ailments, headaches and nosebleeds. The move comes a few weeks after U.S. Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) urged Allenco Energy Co. to suspend oil production in the University Park neighborhood, half a mile north of USC, "until the experts tell us it is safe for our most vulnerable populations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2013 | By Frank Shyong
A Los Angeles County Superior Court judge Friday delayed a ruling on the city of Irwindale's request to temporarily shut down the Sriracha hot sauce factory in response to residents' claims of a harmful odor. Judge Robert H. O'Brien said he had been anticipating a report from the South Coast Air Quality Management District on the nature of the smell. Inspectors had installed air sampling devices at the factory and around the neighborhood. "I expected more information from your side," O'Brien told attorney John R. Tate, who represents Huy Fong Foods.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2013 | By Frank Shyong
A Los Angeles County Superior Court judge made no ruling Friday whether to grant the city of Irwindale's request to temporarily halt production at the Sriracha hot sauce plant because of odor complaints. Judge Robert H. O'Brien said he would take the matter under submission.  "I expected more information from your side," O'Brien told attorney John R. Tate, who is representing Sriracha maker Huy Fong Foods.  O'Brien said he was hoping to review a report from the South Coast Air Quality Management District, which had installed air-monitoring devices at the Irwindale plant to collect data.  Tate said they have not received any report from the district and have not received any citations for odor problems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2013 | By Emily Foxhall
A 17-year-old Huntington Beach high school senior who committed suicide could have been saved if police had been more aggressive after receiving a warning that the youth was planning to kill himself, the teen's parents are alleging in a lawsuit. Police failed to warn the family when they learned of an online posting by Matthew Cline in which he threatened to kill himself, according to a suit filed in Orange County Superior Court. A varsity football player entering his senior year at Liberty Christian High School, Cline used a website and mobile app called iFunny, which typically features funny images, to warn of his death the day before he shot himself in the head last July, according to the suit.
BUSINESS
November 19, 2013 | By Jerry Hirsch
Today's cars have turned into traveling towers of Babel. Car infotainment systems freeze. Phones don't always sync. Bluetooth sound quality is poor. And simple tasks take too many touches and clicks. At the core of the problem: The cars and devices speak different languages, with no common standard for operating systems or software. "We have to make this work better," said Philip Abram, chief infotainment officer for General Motors Co. "We have to make this easier for our customers.
BUSINESS
November 19, 2013 | By Alana Semuels
It may be some companies' worst nightmare: the National Labor Relations Board, which is fully functioning with all its members for the first time since August 2003, is beginning to investigate labor practices and big companies, and so far, has sided with labor. The NLRB's general counsel said Monday that it had investigated charges against Wal-Mart regarding employee protests last year in 13 states including California. It found that the retailer unlawfully threatened employees with reprisal if they engaged in strikes on Black Friday, unlawfully disciplined workers who did in engage in those strikes and unlawfully treated employees in other stores in anticipation of them participating in strikes or other labor activities.
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