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Complaints

BUSINESS
September 25, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
A Wall Street regulatory body has been too quick to let brokers wipe their records clean of customer complaints, and in many cases made allegations disappear without a hearing, an organization of lawyers who represent individual investors said Monday. Arbitration panels convened by the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority approved brokers' requests to wipe out 98% of customer complaints, according to a study by the Public Investors Arbitration Bar Assn.
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NEWS
July 10, 1991
Here are the types of allegations, as classified by the LAPD, made against its officers by the public. There were 8,274 allegations from January, 1986, through December, 1990. False Imprisonment: 1.9% Miscellaneous: 7.0% Other*: 2.7% Excessive Force: 24.7% Improper Tactics: 14.5% Discourtesy: 18.5% Unbecoming Conduct: 12.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 1994
A 90-minute flight exercise Monday night involving a squadron of jets about to be deployed on an aircraft carrier sparked a number of noise complaints to the El Toro Marine Corps Air Station, a base spokesman said. "They practiced landing like they will on the ship," said the officer, who asked not to be identified. "It's something that's a perishable skill. Landing on an aircraft carrier is not the easiest thing in the world."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1997
Want to complain about a city department, police officer or commission but don't want to leave your computer? Los Angeles City Councilwoman Laura Chick has just the idea: Get on the Internet and let your fingers do the talking. Under a motion approved Wednesday by the City Council, the 44 city departments, agencies and commissions with home pages on the World Wide Web will include complaint forms by January 1998. Gov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1997 | FRANK WILLIAMS
With Gov. Pete Wilson's signing of Assembly Bill 206 on Sunday, Californians can now avoid weeks of waiting on the phone or dealing with snail mail when they want to express their frustrations with state agencies. The bill allows people to call up state Web sites and electronically file formal complaints or comments about particular state departments. Constituents also may lodge complaints against state workers the same way.
BUSINESS
August 27, 1999 | ROBIN FIELDS, Robin Fields covers consumer issues for The Times. She can be reached at (714) 966-7810 and at robin.fields@latimes.com
The National Consumer League's gripe report for the first half of 1999 shows a dramatic drop in complaints about cramming, the nickname for billing consumers for telephone services they never ordered. The telephone industry adopted voluntary guidelines in July 1998 giving consumers more protections. Several companies now block third-party vendors from billing consumers for services unless consumers specifically instruct the carrier to do so.
BUSINESS
February 15, 2000 | Bloomberg News
EBay Inc., the largest Internet auction operator, said it will assist the Federal Trade Commission and other law enforcement agencies combating the fastest-growing type of fraud by turning over complaints by its customers. The information that EBay will provide to the FTC can be used by more than 200 law enforcement agencies that are grappling with an explosion in Internet auction fraud. The announcement came as officials from the FTC, the Justice Department, the U.S.
TRAVEL
June 24, 2001 | Times Staff
Travel often is marred by glitches. Airlines, cruise lines, hotels and tour operators may disappoint. To whom should a traveler turn? In many cases there's an agency somewhere that wants to hear your complaints. A few general rules apply: * Write down a detailed account of your problem. * Complain as soon as possible after the problem has occurred. * When asking for compensation, specify the amount. * Begin with your travel agent, if you used one.
BUSINESS
September 22, 1998 | Bloomberg News
The Teamsters union filed new complaints against Anheuser-Busch Cos. with the National Labor Relations Board and said it will challenge plans by the beer maker to start operating under its most recent contract offer. The Teamsters, representing more than 8,000, or about a third, of Anheuser-Busch's employees, said the company refuses to put proposals in writing and has stopped allowing union members to pay dues through payroll deduction.
BUSINESS
May 25, 2000 | Sharon Bernstein
A year after a legal case and a devastating internal report forced Kaiser Permanente to revamp its system of binding arbitration, complaints against the state's largest HMO are being heard sooner, according to a report issued by the independent attorney who now runs the program.
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