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ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1987
I would like to rectify some omissions regarding certain people who helped me during my earlier days ("Conti's 'Rocky' Road Leads to Rome and Back," by Charles Champlin, Oct. 17). While I was composing the score of my first American picture, "Blume in Love," in Rome, Alan Peppe, the still photographer, helped persuade me to come to Hollywood where I stayed with him. Peppe suggested I compose some music on speculation and took a tape with him when he started work on "Harry and Tonto."
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2014 | By Barbara Isenberg
CHICAGO - When London-born Anna Clyne was 7, friends of her parents gave her family a piano with randomly missing keys. Undeterred, Clyne not only played that piano but by age 11 had written a few little songs for herself and a flute-playing friend. She had fun doing it, she remembers, but "I never thought I would become a composer. " These days, there is no longer any doubt on her part or anyone else's. Her idiosyncratic music has been performed not only at Symphony Center in Chicago but also in Los Angeles' Walt Disney Concert Hall, New York's Carnegie Hall and London's Barbican Centre.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2008
I ENJOYED Ann Powers' article on Dolly Parton ["A Sweet '9 to 5' gig," Sept. 21]. I've read other articles and interviews that, of course, portray her as genuine and hard-working. However, this was most comprehensive in pointing out how talented she is at composing on the fly as well as dealing with male chauvinism early in her career. Mark Jones St. Petersburg, Fla.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2014
Sheila MacRae Actress-singer was on '60s 'Honeymooners' Sheila MacRae, 92, a versatile actress and singer who performed in a popular 1950s nightclub act with her husband, Gordon MacRae, and appeared opposite Jackie Gleason in his late '60s revival of "The Honeymooners," died Thursday night at the Lillian Booth Actors Home of the Actors Fund in Englewood, N.J. She had undergone surgery a few weeks ago and had apparently been recovering well...
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2009 | Diane Haithman
As he was the leader of the Los Angeles Philharmonic for 17 years, there are some who probably expected former music director Esa-Pekka Salonen, 51, to be sitting front and center when his successor, 28-year-old Venezuelan Gustavo Dudamel, stepped up to the podium for his inaugural concerts earlier this month at the Hollywood Bowl and Walt Disney Concert Hall. But that's not Salonen's style. During a recent telephone chat, Salonen, who stepped down from the post largely to pursue his passion for composing and now holds the title of the Philharmonic's first conductor laureate, talked about why he was conspicuously absent from the hoopla.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2008 | August Brown, Times Staff Writer
The FIRST vocal lines of young composer Nico Muhly’s new album, "Mothertongue," consist of a seemingly arbitrary list of numbers and addresses. Sung by mezzo-soprano Abigail Fischer over aching strings and a distorted sub-bass synthesizer, the arrangement feels like a Stockhausen gag; a misdirection that subverts your expectations about how the work might move you. For Muhly, however, there's poetry in all that data. "If you ask someone to name all the phone numbers you can off the top of your head, it's going to be pretty interesting," the Manhattanite said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2008 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Bob Florence, a pianist, arranger, composer and bandleader who won a Grammy and two Emmy awards in a career reaching back to the late '50s, died Thursday at Barlow Respiratory Hospital in Los Angeles after a lengthy bout with pneumonia. He was 75. Although his schedule of activities was cut back a few months ago because of his illness, he had remained active, leading his Bob Florence Limited Edition big band in October and writing composing commissions from the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers, the International Assn.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2011 | Randy Lewis
At Glen Campbell's house in Malibu, a large framed painting of the great Gypsy jazz guitarist Django Reinhardt hangs over a baby grand piano in the living room. Campbell is proud of the portrait of the musician who quite possibly is Campbell's biggest hero on the instrument with which both men came to fame, happily showing it off to a visitor on an overcast morning recently. "I was walking down the street -- not this one...," he says, prompting his wife, Kim, to remind him: "Rodeo Drive.
NEWS
September 5, 1987 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Morton Feldman, an expressionistic composer who gloried in his iconoclasm as he both irritated and intrigued audiences with esoteric exercises in form and melody, died Thursday of cancer. He was 61 and had been in a hospital in Buffalo, N.Y., near the State University of Buffalo where he had taught for the last 15 years. Although based in New York most of his life, Feldman taught across the country, primarily at conservatories and colleges where his works normally were performed.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2013 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
When his band mates reach for a way of describing Gustavo Santaolalla, the Oscar-winning musician and producer, they frequently compare him to rock 'n' roll legends: "the Argentine Bob Dylan," the "South American Brian Wilson," and so on. But if they really want to haul out the big-gauge superlatives, they turn to fútbol . (These are Latin Americans, after all.) "I don't know if you're a soccer fan," says Adrián Sosa, longtime drummer for Bajofondo, the stylistically omnivorous band that he and Santaolalla belong to, "but I compare him all the time with guys like Maradona, like Messi.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2014 | By David Ng
He isn't completely deaf. He didn't really compose his own music. And now he's sorry for lying about it. Mamoru Samuragochi, the composer who was once popularly referred to as the Beethoven of Japan, appeared at a news conference in Tokyo on Friday and apologized for deceiving the public. "I have caused a great deal of trouble with my lies for everyone, including those people who bought my CDs and came to my concerts," he said, according to a report from Reuters. GRAPHIC: Highest-earning conductors In February, it was revealed that Samuragochi had employed a ghost writer to compose his symphonies and other music, and that his claims to being totally deaf weren't true.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2014 | By David Ng
Under the Articles of War enacted by the British Navy in the 18th century, many crimes qualified as capital offenses, including mutiny, treason, robbery, sodomy and murder. Executions were often carried out by hanging, with the convict strung up from the ship's yardarm. By accounts from that era, these hangings were more a gradual strangulation than a snap of the neck. They were also complicated, requiring several men to hoist and secure the convict at a considerable height on a moving ship.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
We cannot escape Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky. On Thursday, Gustavo Dudamel and the Los Angeles Philharmonic, with help from the Símon Bolívar Symphony Orchestra of Venezuela, begin an 11-day TchaikovskyFest at Walt Disney Concert Hall that will include the Russian composer's six symphonies along with other orchestral and chamber works. But unlike other festivals - and especially the Mahler Project, Dudamel's concentrated traversal through nine symphonies with the L.A. Phil and his Bolívars two years ago - the TchaikovskyFest has no musical frame.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Driving home from a performance of Handel's "Theodora" the night Pete Seeger died, I switched on the radio. "Where Have All the Flowers Gone" was playing. It was an extraordinary concurrence. Handel's oratorio concerns political protest. Christian martyrs Theodora and her lover stand up to bad government, as Seeger so often, so famously and so effectively did. Handel's score has an unromanticized directness, another Seeger specialty. Plus Seeger, like Handel, lifted spirits, however sad the subject.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2014
John Cacavas Composer's career was helped by Telly Savalas John Cacavas, 83, a composer, arranger and conductor who parlayed his friendship with actor Telly Savalas into a prolific career scoring music for film and television, including a theme to "Kojak," died Jan. 28 at his home in Beverly Hills, his family announced. He had been in declining health. While working in London in the early 1970s, Cacavas met Savalas. He agreed to produce an album for the actor, who promised to help the composer get into the film business.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2014 | By Glenn Whipp
The Motion Picture Academy released its first statement Saturday since revoking the Oscar nomination of Bruce Broughton, the composer of "Alone Yet Not Alone," which would have been one of the five contenders for original song at this year's Academy Awards on March 2. It was the first time the academy had ever nullified an Oscar nomination on ethical grounds. "The Board of Governors' decision to rescind the Original Song nomination ... was made thoughtfully and after careful consideration," the statement read.
NEWS
February 16, 1999 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John A. "Jaki" Byard, eclectic jazz pianist, composer and teacher who recorded with such luminaries as Charles Mingus and Rahasaan Roland Kirk, has been found shot to death. He was 76. Byard was shot in the head Thursday in his home in Queens, N.Y., which he shared with his two daughters. The family said no shots were heard, and a police investigation is continuing. His life and his music paralleled the evolution of jazz.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2002 | From Times Staff Writers
Shony Alex Braun, 70, Holocaust survivor, violinist and composer who wrote a "Symphony of the Holocaust," died Friday in Los Angeles of pneumonia. Born in Transylvania, Braun was interned as a teenager by the Nazis at Auschwitz and Dachau and survived a bullet wound. A historical account of Braun's experiences, and those of his wife, Shari, have been included in the archives of the Wexner Learning Center of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Even for a city in which architectural surprise is no surprise, the Wilshire Boulevard Temple surprises. Do yourself a favor and step inside; the interior has just been magnificently restored. A radiant 1929 mural surrounds the domed synagogue, conveying Jewish history from biblical times to the arrival of Jews in the New World in vivid Hollywood-esque imagery. Commissioned by the Warner brothers, it defies an orthodox reading of the Second Commandment, which forbids graven images.
SPORTS
January 19, 2014 | Bill Dwyre
  Young Patrick Reed regained consciousness just in time to make Sunday's final round of the Humana Challenge golf tournament at La Quinta interesting. He had described his first three rounds of 63-63-63 as similar to "being in a putting coma. " The other players in the tournament could only nod in agreement. Going into Sunday on the Palmer Private course, Reed had made a total of two bogeys. That, along with his 25 birdies and two eagles, gave him a seven-shot lead and reduced the victory expectations of the rest of the field to zilch.
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