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November 14, 1987
I would like to rectify some omissions regarding certain people who helped me during my earlier days ("Conti's 'Rocky' Road Leads to Rome and Back," by Charles Champlin, Oct. 17). While I was composing the score of my first American picture, "Blume in Love," in Rome, Alan Peppe, the still photographer, helped persuade me to come to Hollywood where I stayed with him. Peppe suggested I compose some music on speculation and took a tape with him when he started work on "Harry and Tonto."
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2014 | Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Anne LeBaron is a composer as transformer. She transforms instruments, such as putting objects on the strings of the harp to tease out hidden sounds. She transforms cultural contexts, be they Kazakh, Bach or Katrina. She deals with what we know, with issues of our time and place. But her knack is for alternative realities, showing us the here and now from a point just slightly off the beaten track. That, of course, makes it difficult to generalize about a two-part portrait of LeBaron in two concerts Saturday and Sunday at REDCAT.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2008
I ENJOYED Ann Powers' article on Dolly Parton ["A Sweet '9 to 5' gig," Sept. 21]. I've read other articles and interviews that, of course, portray her as genuine and hard-working. However, this was most comprehensive in pointing out how talented she is at composing on the fly as well as dealing with male chauvinism early in her career. Mark Jones St. Petersburg, Fla.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Susan King
Quincy Jones knew even at a young age that he wanted to compose film scores. "I used to go to movies for 11 cents," Jones said at his mansion nestled in the Bel-Air hills. "I used to play hooky in Seattle every day. I could tell if a movie was scored at 20th Century Fox with Alfred Newman or at Paramount with Victor Young. I could just feel it. " Jones, who studied with composers Nadia Boulanger and Olivier Messiaen in Paris in 1957, would become one of the top film composers in Hollywood by the 1960s.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2009 | Diane Haithman
As he was the leader of the Los Angeles Philharmonic for 17 years, there are some who probably expected former music director Esa-Pekka Salonen, 51, to be sitting front and center when his successor, 28-year-old Venezuelan Gustavo Dudamel, stepped up to the podium for his inaugural concerts earlier this month at the Hollywood Bowl and Walt Disney Concert Hall. But that's not Salonen's style. During a recent telephone chat, Salonen, who stepped down from the post largely to pursue his passion for composing and now holds the title of the Philharmonic's first conductor laureate, talked about why he was conspicuously absent from the hoopla.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2008 | August Brown, Times Staff Writer
The FIRST vocal lines of young composer Nico Muhly’s new album, "Mothertongue," consist of a seemingly arbitrary list of numbers and addresses. Sung by mezzo-soprano Abigail Fischer over aching strings and a distorted sub-bass synthesizer, the arrangement feels like a Stockhausen gag; a misdirection that subverts your expectations about how the work might move you. For Muhly, however, there's poetry in all that data. "If you ask someone to name all the phone numbers you can off the top of your head, it's going to be pretty interesting," the Manhattanite said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2008 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Bob Florence, a pianist, arranger, composer and bandleader who won a Grammy and two Emmy awards in a career reaching back to the late '50s, died Thursday at Barlow Respiratory Hospital in Los Angeles after a lengthy bout with pneumonia. He was 75. Although his schedule of activities was cut back a few months ago because of his illness, he had remained active, leading his Bob Florence Limited Edition big band in October and writing composing commissions from the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers, the International Assn.
NEWS
September 5, 1987 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Morton Feldman, an expressionistic composer who gloried in his iconoclasm as he both irritated and intrigued audiences with esoteric exercises in form and melody, died Thursday of cancer. He was 61 and had been in a hospital in Buffalo, N.Y., near the State University of Buffalo where he had taught for the last 15 years. Although based in New York most of his life, Feldman taught across the country, primarily at conservatories and colleges where his works normally were performed.
NEWS
February 16, 1999 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John A. "Jaki" Byard, eclectic jazz pianist, composer and teacher who recorded with such luminaries as Charles Mingus and Rahasaan Roland Kirk, has been found shot to death. He was 76. Byard was shot in the head Thursday in his home in Queens, N.Y., which he shared with his two daughters. The family said no shots were heard, and a police investigation is continuing. His life and his music paralleled the evolution of jazz.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2002 | From Times Staff Writers
Shony Alex Braun, 70, Holocaust survivor, violinist and composer who wrote a "Symphony of the Holocaust," died Friday in Los Angeles of pneumonia. Born in Transylvania, Braun was interned as a teenager by the Nazis at Auschwitz and Dachau and survived a bullet wound. A historical account of Braun's experiences, and those of his wife, Shari, have been included in the archives of the Wexner Learning Center of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Before there was Minimalism there was Post-Minimalism. That might seem hardly feasible if you put your trust in time being an irreversible process. Theoretical physics, however, allows for a more open future in which the concepts of past and present become malleable. With the advent of Minimalism in music 50 years ago, young composers cleaned the slate with basic chords, simple melodic formulas, a beat and, most of all, a salute to repetition. All that was off-limits in the Modernist musical revolution set off a half-century earlier.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2014 | By Barbara Isenberg
CHICAGO - When London-born Anna Clyne was 7, friends of her parents gave her family a piano with randomly missing keys. Undeterred, Clyne not only played that piano but by age 11 had written a few little songs for herself and a flute-playing friend. She had fun doing it, she remembers, but "I never thought I would become a composer. " These days, there is no longer any doubt on her part or anyone else's. Her idiosyncratic music has been performed not only at Symphony Center in Chicago but also in Los Angeles' Walt Disney Concert Hall, New York's Carnegie Hall and London's Barbican Centre.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2014 | By David Ng
He isn't completely deaf. He didn't really compose his own music. And now he's sorry for lying about it. Mamoru Samuragochi, the composer who was once popularly referred to as the Beethoven of Japan, appeared at a news conference in Tokyo on Friday and apologized for deceiving the public. "I have caused a great deal of trouble with my lies for everyone, including those people who bought my CDs and came to my concerts," he said, according to a report from Reuters. GRAPHIC: Highest-earning conductors In February, it was revealed that Samuragochi had employed a ghost writer to compose his symphonies and other music, and that his claims to being totally deaf weren't true.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2014
Sheila MacRae Actress-singer was on '60s 'Honeymooners' Sheila MacRae, 92, a versatile actress and singer who performed in a popular 1950s nightclub act with her husband, Gordon MacRae, and appeared opposite Jackie Gleason in his late '60s revival of "The Honeymooners," died Thursday night at the Lillian Booth Actors Home of the Actors Fund in Englewood, N.J. She had undergone surgery a few weeks ago and had apparently been recovering well...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2014 | By David Ng
Under the Articles of War enacted by the British Navy in the 18th century, many crimes qualified as capital offenses, including mutiny, treason, robbery, sodomy and murder. Executions were often carried out by hanging, with the convict strung up from the ship's yardarm. By accounts from that era, these hangings were more a gradual strangulation than a snap of the neck. They were also complicated, requiring several men to hoist and secure the convict at a considerable height on a moving ship.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
We cannot escape Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky. On Thursday, Gustavo Dudamel and the Los Angeles Philharmonic, with help from the Símon Bolívar Symphony Orchestra of Venezuela, begin an 11-day TchaikovskyFest at Walt Disney Concert Hall that will include the Russian composer's six symphonies along with other orchestral and chamber works. But unlike other festivals - and especially the Mahler Project, Dudamel's concentrated traversal through nine symphonies with the L.A. Phil and his Bolívars two years ago - the TchaikovskyFest has no musical frame.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1986 | CHRIS PASLES
Audiences often wonder why composers don't write symphonies the way Beethoven did. But some of those who try, according to Los Angeles Philharmonic composer-in-residence John Harbison, get left out of the performance mainstream. "The post-classical approach is a lost half of the American tradition," Harbison, 48, said. "That was a line that became cut off in the mid-1950s when it became fairly unpopular with music practitioners." Now, however, Harbison sees a counter-trend forming.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1986 | MARC SHULGOLD
The experimental-music series at Los Angeles Theatre Center goes by the name of Quantum Leap. That's exactly what locally based composer-synthesizer player Michael Stearns provided on Sunday--a giant leap. Backward. Aided by the five-member M'Ocean Dancers (catch the pun?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Driving home from a performance of Handel's "Theodora" the night Pete Seeger died, I switched on the radio. "Where Have All the Flowers Gone" was playing. It was an extraordinary concurrence. Handel's oratorio concerns political protest. Christian martyrs Theodora and her lover stand up to bad government, as Seeger so often, so famously and so effectively did. Handel's score has an unromanticized directness, another Seeger specialty. Plus Seeger, like Handel, lifted spirits, however sad the subject.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2014
John Cacavas Composer's career was helped by Telly Savalas John Cacavas, 83, a composer, arranger and conductor who parlayed his friendship with actor Telly Savalas into a prolific career scoring music for film and television, including a theme to "Kojak," died Jan. 28 at his home in Beverly Hills, his family announced. He had been in declining health. While working in London in the early 1970s, Cacavas met Savalas. He agreed to produce an album for the actor, who promised to help the composer get into the film business.
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