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Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1999
The world may be a more dangerous place today following the U.S. Senate's untimely and unnecessary rejection of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty--a goal of American presidents for more than 40 years. The GOP leadership of the Senate must bear the responsibility for this decision, the first time the Senate has voted down an arms control pact. The Republican leadership forced the vote Wednesday in spite of desperate efforts to postpone action, probably until the next Congress, in 2001.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1999 | ROBERT E. HUNTER, Robert E. Hunter is a senior advisor at Rand Corp. in Washington
Today, the U.S. Senate is scheduled to pass judgment on the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty--either rejecting it outright or, its proponents hope, postponing a vote, perhaps until 2001. Few Americans understand what the treaty is about, and most have never heard of it. That is precisely the problem: This treaty is being considered without sufficient strategic analysis, public discussion and political debate.
NEWS
September 25, 1998 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under international pressure to curb nuclear tensions in South Asia, India indicated publicly for the first time Thursday that it aims to complete negotiations so a global nuclear test-ban treaty can go into effect within a year. But in an address at the U.N. General Assembly in New York, Indian Prime Minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee did not specifically promise to sign the accord, a key component of international efforts to end the nuclear arms race.
NEWS
January 13, 1999 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration announced Tuesday that it will make ratification of a global treaty banning nuclear testing a priority for 1999, a move that launches President Clinton on a collision course with key Republicans already sworn in as jurors in his Senate impeachment trial. Speaking at an international conference on nonproliferation here, National Security Advisor Samuel R. "Sandy" Berger said Clinton will press the Senate to ratify the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1998 | TOM Z. COLLINA, Tom Z. Collina is director of arms control and international security at the Union of Concerned Scientists in Washington
Now that the dust has settled at the Indian and Pakistani test sites, some conservative politicians and pundits are issuing an eerily consistent reaction: Missile defense, good. Test ban, bad. Although this refrain may be politically convenient, it will not solve the real security threats facing the United States and the world. Many are using these recent global events and their profound implications for U.S. security to "spin" their own political agenda.
NEWS
September 11, 1996 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The landmark Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty won overwhelming approval Tuesday in the United Nations, marking a major step in global disarmament efforts and opening the way to an end to 51 years of nuclear testing by the United States and other major powers. The final vote in the U.N. General Assembly listed 158 countries in favor of the worldwide pact and three against it, with five nations abstaining.
NEWS
October 6, 1999 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Senate leaders Tuesday began backing away from a showdown vote on the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, amid growing signs that the measure, one of President Clinton's top foreign policy priorities, faces almost certain defeat. Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott (R-Miss.), and Senate Minority Leader Tom Daschle (D-S.D.) said that they are discussing whether to delay a vote on the landmark arms proposal, which seeks to halt nuclear proliferation by imposing a worldwide ban on underground testing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 2000 | I.K. GUJRAL, I.K. Gujral was prime minister of India from 1997 to 1998
President Clinton is on a voyage of discovery to see for himself the success story of the parliamentary democracy in India that has evolved to a point where consensus-building and decision-making have become established norms. This is underpinned by the political arithmetic in government formation where coalitions have now become a rule. When I was prime minister, my government consisted of 13 parties.
NEWS
October 12, 1999 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton made another concession to Republicans on Monday, the eve of the Senate's scheduled vote on the nuclear test-ban treaty, raising the possibility that the two sides may hammer out a deal to avert an almost-certain defeat of the pact. With Senate action expected late today or Wednesday, Clinton gave in to Republican demands that he put in writing a request that the vote be postponed. He wrote to Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott (R-Miss.
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