Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCompulsive Gambling
IN THE NEWS

Compulsive Gambling

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1985 | STEVE GEISSINGER, Associated Press
The state will be closely watching who plays its new lottery, and it's a safe bet that both gambling critics and supporters will find ammunition in the marketing studies for their endless clash. Critics such as the National Council on Compulsive Gambling in New York say that the spreading state lotteries are basically a regressive tax on those who can least afford to pay, and that at least 2% of the Californians who discover gambling through the lottery will become compulsive gamblers.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
May 23, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Tiger Woods' mistresses. Arnold Schwarzenegger's secret child. Bill Clinton's sexual escapades in the Oval Office. Every case of a prominent man risking his family, career and status for extramarital sex raises the question: What were they thinking? Mental health experts wonder this too, and not just because of the cases that make headlines. Each year, thousands of men and women from all walks of life seek psychiatric help for sexual conduct disorders, said doctors gathered here last week at the annual meeting of the American Psychiatric Assn.
Advertisement
SCIENCE
February 1, 2006 | Robert Lee Hotz, Times Staff Writer
For the estimated 6 million compulsive gamblers in the U.S., the long odds are on a pill. In the largest clinical study of its kind, researchers at the University of Minnesota found that daily doses of an experimental drug called nalmefene, often used to treat alcoholism, appeared to curb the craving to gamble.
SCIENCE
February 1, 2006 | Robert Lee Hotz, Times Staff Writer
For the estimated 6 million compulsive gamblers in the U.S., the long odds are on a pill. In the largest clinical study of its kind, researchers at the University of Minnesota found that daily doses of an experimental drug called nalmefene, often used to treat alcoholism, appeared to curb the craving to gamble.
NEWS
March 28, 1989 | GARY LIBMAN, Times Staff Writer
For 12 years, Diane played poker in Gardena casinos nightly until 4:30 a.m. While regularly kiting checks and stealing from her husband and children to finance her habit, she quit her job because she believed she could earn a living gambling. Johnny also gambled in Gardena--three nights during the week and all weekend. Although he counted cards well and won regularly at blackjack in Nevada casinos, he didn't feel the narcoticlike rush he got from poker.
BUSINESS
October 28, 1986 | NANCY L. ROSS, The Washington Post
He was just 19 years old when he went to work in the Chicago commodity pits, and within two years he'd bought his own seat on the exchange. Soon he was earning as much as $200,000 a year speculating in corn, beans and stock options. Risking his fortune every day for a living, he soon found himself doing the same thing for pleasure, betting heavily on sports. Somewhere between the ages of 20 and 27 he says he "crossed the line."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1988 | From Times staff and wire reports
According to a federal study, up to 4.2 million Americans may be addicted to the "high" of placing bets. The figure is about four times greater than previous estimates on the extent of the problem of compulsive gambling nationally. Preliminary findings of the study, commissioned by the National Institute of Mental Health, also suggest that the stereotypical profile of the compulsive gambler as a white, middle-aged, middle-class male is inaccurate.
NEWS
December 13, 1998 | MATEA GOLD and DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Rex Coile's life is a narrow box, so dark and confining he wonders how he got trapped inside, whether he'll ever get out. He never goes to the movies, never sees concerts, never lies on a sunny beach, never travels on vacation, never spends Christmas with his family. Instead, Rex shares floor space in cheap motels with other compulsive gamblers, comforting himself with delusional dreams of jackpots that will magically wipe away three decades of wreckage.
SPORTS
September 27, 1985 | Associated Press
The security director of the National Football League said Thursday that compulsive gambling is the second most serious problem, behind drug abuse, facing professional athletes. And the director, Warren R. Welch, said that NFL officials are placing signs in locker rooms and inserts in playbooks to supplement training camp talks aimed at discouraging the league's 1,200 players from gambling.
SPORTS
August 2, 1989 | From Associated Press
A psychologist who treats compulsive gamblers believes that even if Manager Pete Rose of the Cincinnati Reds has bet on the Reds, banning him from baseball would be a major error. "I've never met this man," Rob Hunter said of Rose. "I have no idea if he's a compulsive gambler. If he is, I think it should be treated as an addiction. I think it would be criminal if they throw him out of baseball.
NEWS
September 4, 2005 | Larry McShane, Associated Press Writer
For Andrew, the neon buzz of the Strip in Las Vegas was his mecca. Once he was old enough, Andrew planned a pilgrimage from his East Coast birthplace to the bright lights in the Nevada desert. Yet before he was old enough to enter a casino, the teenager was already struggling with compulsive gambling. His high school grades were dropping, his bank account dwindling, his hopes for the future fading. Now 18 years old, he explains in his own words how gambling messed up his life.
HEALTH
August 8, 2005 | Marianne Szegedy-Maszak, Special to The Times
THE day that Marilyn Lancelot won the biggest jackpot of her life, she left the casino in Yuma, Ariz., with every penny of the $4,000 that had poured out of the slot machines. This time she knew that she would never gamble again. She was right, although not for the reasons she thought. The next day, seven police cars appeared in her Phoenix driveway and she was taken out of her house in handcuffs.
SCIENCE
July 12, 2005 | Brad Wible, Times Staff Writer
A handful of drugs that are commonly prescribed for Parkinson's disease can convert a tiny fraction of patients into compulsive gamblers in as little as a month, according to a study published today in the journal Archives of Neurology. The study is one of several to show the link and confirms that the drug pramipexole -- widely prescribed under the brand name Mirapex -- is the most likely to cause the rare side effect. Dr. M. Leann Dodd, a psychiatrist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.
NEWS
June 13, 2004 | Alan Sayre, Associated Press Writer
Legalized gambling has provided a jackpot of tax dollars for many states, but virtually no money is being funneled to treat the exploding numbers of problem players -- the ones who could lose everything. Louisiana has the nation's only two state-supported residential treatment centers for problem gamblers. Among the other gambling states, only New Jersey chips in -- on a limited basis -- for outpatient treatment.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2002 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Of all the performances that have made Jeanne Moreau revered among actresses, her work in "Bay of Angels" is one of the most compelling and one of the least seen. Directed in 1963 by Jacques Demy, "Bay of Angels" has been unavailable theatrically in this country for nearly 40 years. But a new 35-millimeter wide-screen print has been struck, and this celebrated film is once again open for business, playing at the Nuart in West Los Angeles for one week.
NEWS
April 22, 2001 | DAVID CRARY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The chartered bus from Brooklyn was just one of hundreds that roll into the depots of Atlantic City's huge casinos each day. The passengers disembarked, some spry and feisty, a few inching down the steps with their canes. Past the Showboat Casino's reception desks and uniformed greeters awaited slot machines by the thousands--the playthings of choice for legions of elderly Americans. Group leader Lola Kendzierski was ready for action.
SCIENCE
July 12, 2005 | Brad Wible, Times Staff Writer
A handful of drugs that are commonly prescribed for Parkinson's disease can convert a tiny fraction of patients into compulsive gamblers in as little as a month, according to a study published today in the journal Archives of Neurology. The study is one of several to show the link and confirms that the drug pramipexole -- widely prescribed under the brand name Mirapex -- is the most likely to cause the rare side effect. Dr. M. Leann Dodd, a psychiatrist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.
SPORTS
June 25, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Manager Pete Rose of the Cincinnati Reds should be given a chance at treatment for compulsive gambling instead of being banned from baseball if he is found to have bet on the sport, a New Jersey counselor for compulsive gamblers said Saturday. Arnold Wexler, executive director of the Council on Compulsive Gambling in New Jersey, said Rose should be treated no differently than players who have been found to be addicted to drugs or alcohol. "When a baseball player admits he has an alcohol or drug dependency, that player is placed in a rehabilitation program and then given an opportunity to return to his profession," Wexler said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 2000 | MATEA GOLD
Two years ago, Gwen was so dead broke that the woman at the pawnshop where she'd hocked all of her belongings had to spot her $50 so she and her son could buy a Christmas tree. That was a cold, hard holiday. In those days, her car seemed to know its own way to the card club, where she'd bet hundreds of dollars a night. She felt hollow, twisted--had trouble remembering what she was living for.
NEWS
June 18, 1999 | DAVID FERRELL and RICHARD T. COOPER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a report that provides the broadest look yet at compulsive gambling in America, a special federal commission is urging a moratorium on the growth of legalized wagering and sweeping policy reforms to try to stop reckless losses, especially among teenagers and the poor. It places the number of compulsive gamblers at 5.4 million, substantially more than previously thought and more than the nation's rolls of hard-core drug users.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|