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Computer Games

NEWS
November 2, 2001 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Inside a concrete-and-glass laboratory at the Naval Postgraduate School, a computer simulation of Osama bin Laden's Al Qaeda terrorist network is beginning to take shape. Scientists are preparing to conjure deserts, urban landscapes, communications networks, weapon systems, immigration patterns and an army of terrorists cunning enough to design plots of mass destruction. They also are fashioning millions of potential victims who will be preyed on thousands and thousands of times.
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BUSINESS
March 21, 2001 | JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Having carved out a leading role in Internet audio and video, RealNetworks Inc. is trying to become a top distributor of computer games. The Seattle-based company plans to expand its fledgling games Web site into a comprehensive service for game developers, making a wide selection of their works available to consumers for downloading or playing online. The company is expected to launch the developers' service today, with new RealArcade software for consumers available this summer.
BUSINESS
February 18, 2001 | MATT MOORE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ferry Zuiderwijk is still too young to be a commercial pilot or to hold an MBA. But at age 17, he knows how to keep the nose up while running a sizable airline. The resident of Wateringen, Netherlands, earned his flight stripes playing "Airline Tycoon," a computer simulation game that subjects users to the hassles of federal regulators, crafty equipment dealers and surly passengers.
BUSINESS
January 29, 2001
Over the next five years, video and computer games are expected generate more than $10 billion in sales, a sum that will make them one of the most popular forms of entertainment and an undisputed cultural force. More than 30 speakers, from academics to designers, will examine the changes in video and computer games content and technology that are fueling that growth during a two-day conference starting today at USC's Davidson Conference Center.
BUSINESS
August 24, 2000 | GARY GENTILE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Making a computer game may once have been the exclusive domain of techno-geeks working alone. But today's games, especially those based on television shows or films, can require as much star power and behind-the-scenes expertise as any Hollywood epic. The upcoming "Star Trek: Voyager--Elite Force," for instance, required a casting director, voice-over director and most of the cast of the Paramount TV series, from Captain Janeway to Officer Tuvok.
BUSINESS
August 2, 1999 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER
Hoping to encourage the growth of Northern California game software companies, the organizers behind the Computer Game Developers' Conference in San Jose are taking their show on the road. "Demo or Die" is the theme at this popular gathering of the top guns in the computer gaming industry. It's also a chance for those trying to break into the field to network, swap secrets and find a place among elite programmers, designers and product managers.
NEWS
August 1, 1999 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She came out of nowhere and blew them all away. That's the word on Stevie Case, 22, a.k.a. KillCreek--the cyber world's first chick game champ. Yes, Stevie is a girl. This won't mean much to lovers of sunny, outdoor sports. But in the vast, dark netherworld of those obsessed with electronic "shooters" and "kills," less than 10% of all serious gamers are girls, according to Electronic Gaming Monthly magazine.
NEWS
August 1, 1999 | RENEE TAWA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's frag time, and Ivy Girl's grandparents were just in town. Of course Ivy Girl--24-year-old Deanna Barberino--was happy to hang out with them in San Diego, but her fingers were itching for the rocket launchers of her favorite video game. Two weeks ago, Female Frag Fest '99--the first large-scale, all-female Internet gaming event of its kind--got underway, and Barberino was busy with schoolwork and family.
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