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December 9, 1998 | BOOTH MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It may be the most important connection between the digital and the physical. Happy birthday to the mouse, the little critter that put the computer revolution into the palms of our hands, into our homes and into our collective consciousness. First introduced at a hobbyists conference in San Francisco on Dec. 9, 1968, the mouse was more of a curiosity than anything else.
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NEWS
August 9, 2001 | MICHELLE MALTAIS, michelle.maltais@latimes.com
There once was a time when the personal computer didn't come with a mouse, CD-ROM drive or Web cam. Yes, it is true. Shortly after Earth's crust cooled and human beings began to walk upright, there were such devices. (Of course, sitting hunched over a keyboard did nothing for that newfound posture, but that's another story.) To prove it, check out sites online paying tribute to our PCs' predecessors. Take a stroll through the dinosaur hall of fame at http://www.pc-history.org.
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BUSINESS
September 6, 1999 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No cake, no candles, not even a simple round of "Happy Birthday" was offered to celebrate a revolution that began at UCLA 30 years ago and ultimately eclipsed the walk on the moon, the war protests and the urban riots of the era. But UCLA's School of Engineering and Applied Sciences did throw a party--if you can call a symposium a party--last Thursday for its most famous offspring, the Internet.
NEWS
August 9, 2001
10-20 BILLION YEARS AGO: The Big Bang starts it all off. SOMETIME LATER: Homo sapiens begins counting on fingers and toes. 500 B.C.: Earliest known calculating device, the abacus, is developed in China. 1632: Slide rule created. 1700 1820s: Englishman Charles Babbage proposes the first "computer," a machine that automates the construction of mathematical tables called the Difference Engine. 1940 1946: ENIAC, which is 1,000 times faster than its contemporaries, is unveiled to the public.
BUSINESS
June 14, 1995 | KATHLEEN WIEGNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Long before anyone had dreamed of a Pentium chip or heard of the Internet, before there was an Apple II or a Commodore PET or an IBM PC, there was a humble computer called the Altair. The machine and its maker, MITS, are seldom accorded more than a footnote in the history of the personal computer industry, and any mention is usually in conjunction with a history of Microsoft: how Microsoft co-founders Bill Gates and Paul Allen dropped out of Harvard to write software for the Altair.
NEWS
August 9, 2001 | MICHELLE MALTAIS, michelle.maltais@latimes.com
There once was a time when the personal computer didn't come with a mouse, CD-ROM drive or Web cam. Yes, it is true. Shortly after Earth's crust cooled and human beings began to walk upright, there were such devices. (Of course, sitting hunched over a keyboard did nothing for that newfound posture, but that's another story.) To prove it, check out sites online paying tribute to our PCs' predecessors. Take a stroll through the dinosaur hall of fame at http://www.pc-history.org.
NEWS
August 9, 2001
10-20 BILLION YEARS AGO: The Big Bang starts it all off. SOMETIME LATER: Homo sapiens begins counting on fingers and toes. 500 B.C.: Earliest known calculating device, the abacus, is developed in China. 1632: Slide rule created. 1700 1820s: Englishman Charles Babbage proposes the first "computer," a machine that automates the construction of mathematical tables called the Difference Engine. 1940 1946: ENIAC, which is 1,000 times faster than its contemporaries, is unveiled to the public.
BUSINESS
June 10, 1991 | From Associated Press
Microsoft Corp. has rented a yacht and hired the Dave Brubeck quartet to announce a new version of the world's most widely used computer software. Microsoft says the rollout Tuesday will be the biggest launch of a new software product in computer industry history. The new product is an update of MS-DOS, the base layer of software used on an estimated 60 million IBM-type personal computers worldwide.
BUSINESS
January 7, 1999 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A year ago this week, Hayes Corp. was planning parties to celebrate its historic 20th year in the computer modem business it almost single-handedly created. The company even issued a 20th anniversary commemorative modem, signed by founder Dennis Hayes himself.
BUSINESS
June 14, 1985 | PAUL RICHTER, Times Staff Writer
Sperry Corp. and Burroughs Corp. said Thursday that they are discussing a possible merger that would create the world's second-largest computer manufacturer, with annual revenue of more than $10 billion. Company officials would not elaborate beyond a terse statement saying they are "involved in negotiations with respect to a common stock merger." Industry analysts speculated that Burroughs might pay at least the equivalent of $3.
BUSINESS
September 6, 1999 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No cake, no candles, not even a simple round of "Happy Birthday" was offered to celebrate a revolution that began at UCLA 30 years ago and ultimately eclipsed the walk on the moon, the war protests and the urban riots of the era. But UCLA's School of Engineering and Applied Sciences did throw a party--if you can call a symposium a party--last Thursday for its most famous offspring, the Internet.
NEWS
December 9, 1998 | BOOTH MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It may be the most important connection between the digital and the physical. Happy birthday to the mouse, the little critter that put the computer revolution into the palms of our hands, into our homes and into our collective consciousness. First introduced at a hobbyists conference in San Francisco on Dec. 9, 1968, the mouse was more of a curiosity than anything else.
BUSINESS
June 14, 1995 | KATHLEEN WIEGNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Long before anyone had dreamed of a Pentium chip or heard of the Internet, before there was an Apple II or a Commodore PET or an IBM PC, there was a humble computer called the Altair. The machine and its maker, MITS, are seldom accorded more than a footnote in the history of the personal computer industry, and any mention is usually in conjunction with a history of Microsoft: how Microsoft co-founders Bill Gates and Paul Allen dropped out of Harvard to write software for the Altair.
NEWS
January 27, 1998 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Creating a colossal company with tentacles reaching into every corner of the computer industry, Compaq Computer Corp. on Monday agreed to acquire Digital Equipment Corp. for $9.6 billion in cash and stock. The proposed deal is the largest in computer industry history and could trigger a wave of additional mergers as rivals confront the combined might of two industry legends.
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