Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsComputer Industry History
IN THE NEWS

Computer Industry History

FEATURED ARTICLES
MAGAZINE
May 7, 1995 | Leslie Helm, Times staff writer Leslie Helm is based in Seattle. Her last article for the magazine was about Japan's growing use of nuclear power
Seattle billionaire Paul G. Allen didn't want to make a big deal out of it. When David Geffen called to ask if he wanted in on DreamWorks SKG, with its ambitious plans for a new studio, Allen had his investment bankers pore over the numbers. But he didn't quibble over the stiff asking price. Allen was out to build a "wired world" and an opportunity to work with Hollywood's all-star team on a new, technology-driven entertainment company seemed too good to pass up.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 9, 2001 | DAVID COLKER, david.colker@latimes.com
Your first kiss. Your first car. Your first job. And of course, your first computer. Remember the excitement of opening the box, removing all the components, poring over the manual, and then making your first call to the help line? (It was probably closed.) It might have been love at first sight, but for the next few weeks, you wondered what could have ever possessed you to get such an infuriating, time-consuming machine.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 9, 1998 | BOOTH MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It may be the most important connection between the digital and the physical. Happy birthday to the mouse, the little critter that put the computer revolution into the palms of our hands, into our homes and into our collective consciousness. First introduced at a hobbyists conference in San Francisco on Dec. 9, 1968, the mouse was more of a curiosity than anything else.
NEWS
August 9, 2001 | MICHELLE MALTAIS, michelle.maltais@latimes.com
There once was a time when the personal computer didn't come with a mouse, CD-ROM drive or Web cam. Yes, it is true. Shortly after Earth's crust cooled and human beings began to walk upright, there were such devices. (Of course, sitting hunched over a keyboard did nothing for that newfound posture, but that's another story.) To prove it, check out sites online paying tribute to our PCs' predecessors. Take a stroll through the dinosaur hall of fame at http://www.pc-history.org.
BUSINESS
September 6, 1999 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No cake, no candles, not even a simple round of "Happy Birthday" was offered to celebrate a revolution that began at UCLA 30 years ago and ultimately eclipsed the walk on the moon, the war protests and the urban riots of the era. But UCLA's School of Engineering and Applied Sciences did throw a party--if you can call a symposium a party--last Thursday for its most famous offspring, the Internet.
BUSINESS
June 14, 1995 | KATHLEEN WIEGNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Long before anyone had dreamed of a Pentium chip or heard of the Internet, before there was an Apple II or a Commodore PET or an IBM PC, there was a humble computer called the Altair. The machine and its maker, MITS, are seldom accorded more than a footnote in the history of the personal computer industry, and any mention is usually in conjunction with a history of Microsoft: how Microsoft co-founders Bill Gates and Paul Allen dropped out of Harvard to write software for the Altair.
MAGAZINE
October 27, 1996 | JONATHAN WEBER, Jonathan Weber is editor of The Cutting Edge, The Times' technology section. His last article for the magazine was about the fall of Apple Computer
Microsoft Corp. Chairman Bill Gates gazed around the dark, wooden interior of Harvard's Sanders Theatre and recalled for the standing-room-only crowd the last time he was in that room--for the classics class taught by the legendary professor John Finley. The audience, on hand for an event called the Harvard University Conference on the Internet & Society, roared with laughter.
MAGAZINE
March 14, 1999 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Michael A. Hiltzik is a Times staff writer who covers business and technology
Come, journey back three decades, to a time before the Internet and laptops and disc drives--back to the moment when a major corporation established a legendary incubator for a new technology, and the personal computer was born. As the 1970s opened, Xerox Corp. was coming face to face with both triumph and adversity. Triumph because its standard-bearing product, the Model 914 office copier, was generating a cascade of cash as befit the most successful commercial product in history.
BUSINESS
November 20, 1997
Stanford University has acquired thousands of pieces of memorabilia and artifacts that chronicle the unique 21-year history of Apple Computer Inc. The donation, which filled about 2,000 boxes, comprises documents, hardware, software and other items, and portrays the culture and history of the Cupertino-based company that Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak started in a garage in 1976. The items range from rare to quirky to cheeky, including items that never made it to the production line.
NEWS
August 9, 2001 | DAVID COLKER, david.colker@latimes.com
Your first kiss. Your first car. Your first job. And of course, your first computer. Remember the excitement of opening the box, removing all the components, poring over the manual, and then making your first call to the help line? (It was probably closed.) It might have been love at first sight, but for the next few weeks, you wondered what could have ever possessed you to get such an infuriating, time-consuming machine.
NEWS
August 9, 2001
10-20 BILLION YEARS AGO: The Big Bang starts it all off. SOMETIME LATER: Homo sapiens begins counting on fingers and toes. 500 B.C.: Earliest known calculating device, the abacus, is developed in China. 1632: Slide rule created. 1700 1820s: Englishman Charles Babbage proposes the first "computer," a machine that automates the construction of mathematical tables called the Difference Engine. 1940 1946: ENIAC, which is 1,000 times faster than its contemporaries, is unveiled to the public.
BUSINESS
September 6, 1999 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No cake, no candles, not even a simple round of "Happy Birthday" was offered to celebrate a revolution that began at UCLA 30 years ago and ultimately eclipsed the walk on the moon, the war protests and the urban riots of the era. But UCLA's School of Engineering and Applied Sciences did throw a party--if you can call a symposium a party--last Thursday for its most famous offspring, the Internet.
MAGAZINE
March 14, 1999 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Michael A. Hiltzik is a Times staff writer who covers business and technology
Come, journey back three decades, to a time before the Internet and laptops and disc drives--back to the moment when a major corporation established a legendary incubator for a new technology, and the personal computer was born. As the 1970s opened, Xerox Corp. was coming face to face with both triumph and adversity. Triumph because its standard-bearing product, the Model 914 office copier, was generating a cascade of cash as befit the most successful commercial product in history.
NEWS
December 9, 1998 | BOOTH MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It may be the most important connection between the digital and the physical. Happy birthday to the mouse, the little critter that put the computer revolution into the palms of our hands, into our homes and into our collective consciousness. First introduced at a hobbyists conference in San Francisco on Dec. 9, 1968, the mouse was more of a curiosity than anything else.
BUSINESS
November 20, 1997
Stanford University has acquired thousands of pieces of memorabilia and artifacts that chronicle the unique 21-year history of Apple Computer Inc. The donation, which filled about 2,000 boxes, comprises documents, hardware, software and other items, and portrays the culture and history of the Cupertino-based company that Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak started in a garage in 1976. The items range from rare to quirky to cheeky, including items that never made it to the production line.
MAGAZINE
October 27, 1996 | JONATHAN WEBER, Jonathan Weber is editor of The Cutting Edge, The Times' technology section. His last article for the magazine was about the fall of Apple Computer
Microsoft Corp. Chairman Bill Gates gazed around the dark, wooden interior of Harvard's Sanders Theatre and recalled for the standing-room-only crowd the last time he was in that room--for the classics class taught by the legendary professor John Finley. The audience, on hand for an event called the Harvard University Conference on the Internet & Society, roared with laughter.
NEWS
August 9, 2001 | MICHELLE MALTAIS, michelle.maltais@latimes.com
There once was a time when the personal computer didn't come with a mouse, CD-ROM drive or Web cam. Yes, it is true. Shortly after Earth's crust cooled and human beings began to walk upright, there were such devices. (Of course, sitting hunched over a keyboard did nothing for that newfound posture, but that's another story.) To prove it, check out sites online paying tribute to our PCs' predecessors. Take a stroll through the dinosaur hall of fame at http://www.pc-history.org.
NEWS
August 9, 2001
10-20 BILLION YEARS AGO: The Big Bang starts it all off. SOMETIME LATER: Homo sapiens begins counting on fingers and toes. 500 B.C.: Earliest known calculating device, the abacus, is developed in China. 1632: Slide rule created. 1700 1820s: Englishman Charles Babbage proposes the first "computer," a machine that automates the construction of mathematical tables called the Difference Engine. 1940 1946: ENIAC, which is 1,000 times faster than its contemporaries, is unveiled to the public.
BUSINESS
June 14, 1995 | KATHLEEN WIEGNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Long before anyone had dreamed of a Pentium chip or heard of the Internet, before there was an Apple II or a Commodore PET or an IBM PC, there was a humble computer called the Altair. The machine and its maker, MITS, are seldom accorded more than a footnote in the history of the personal computer industry, and any mention is usually in conjunction with a history of Microsoft: how Microsoft co-founders Bill Gates and Paul Allen dropped out of Harvard to write software for the Altair.
MAGAZINE
May 7, 1995 | Leslie Helm, Times staff writer Leslie Helm is based in Seattle. Her last article for the magazine was about Japan's growing use of nuclear power
Seattle billionaire Paul G. Allen didn't want to make a big deal out of it. When David Geffen called to ask if he wanted in on DreamWorks SKG, with its ambitious plans for a new studio, Allen had his investment bankers pore over the numbers. But he didn't quibble over the stiff asking price. Allen was out to build a "wired world" and an opportunity to work with Hollywood's all-star team on a new, technology-driven entertainment company seemed too good to pass up.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|