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Computer Industry Orange County

BUSINESS
October 8, 1989 | DAVID OLMOS, Times Staff Writer
Charles W. Missler savors the panoramic view from his spacious offices on the seventh floor of a futuristic-looking Irvine office tower. From there, Missler can look past the busy San Diego Freeway to the headquarters of Western Digital Corp., the computer manufacturer he nursed back from bankruptcy in the late 1970s. The view serves both as a reminder of the struggling company he saved and of the sizable personal fortune he made.
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BUSINESS
July 31, 1999 | P.J. Huffstutter
Kingston Technology Co. founders John Tu and David Sun said Friday that they completed their previously announced purchase of 80% of Kingston from Japanese conglomerate Softbank Corp. for $450 million. The deal, handled by Synapse Capital LLC, closed Friday. Sun and Tu sold the stake in Kingston to Softbank three years ago for $1.5 billion in cash and stock. Tu and Sun still own 4.7 million Softbank shares, which are worth about $1.23 billion.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1999 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
CalComp Technology Inc., which has struggled for years to become profitable after being spun off by aerospace and defense giant Lockheed Martin Corp., said Friday it will begin shutting down its operations, terminating 450 employees by the end of the month. CalComp, which manufactures computer graphics products and employs about 250 people in its Anaheim offices, said it hopes to sell off major parts of its business and have an orderly shutdown of operations over the next six months.
NEWS
October 26, 1998 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They wire their hilltop estates for seven computers and shun living anywhere they can't get blisteringly fast access to the Internet. In Land Rovers outfitted with tiny cell phones, they glide the freeways to fortress-like plants in Irvine and Costa Mesa. They commute to Taiwan and Singapore with nonchalance, work 100 hours a week for fun and install Pentium chips in their home computers on New Year's Day for kicks.
BUSINESS
July 2, 1992 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a shift that emphasizes computer software over hardware, Archive Corp. has formed a division to develop computer programs for the data-storage market, the company said Wednesday. The division will combine the software development organizations from its different operating divisions, Chairman D. Howard Lewis said in a statement. The unit will be based in Lake Mary, Fla., where the company already has a subsidiary, Maynard Electronics. It will employ 100 people, none of them new hires.
BUSINESS
August 1, 1990 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
EECO Inc., the computer parts maker that filed for bankruptcy protection in May, said Tuesday it has sold the assets of its Maxi-Switch Keyboard Division to a Taiwanese electronics company. EECO said in a statement it sold the Tucson-based division to Silitek, exclusive of any liabilities. Terms of the deal were not disclosed. Silitek will retain EECO's 100 employees in Tucson, where Taipei-based Silitek will establish its U.S. headquarters.
BUSINESS
June 18, 1994 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Graphix Zone, a multimedia company best known for making an interactive music compact disc for the singer formerly known as Prince, raised $3.9 million Friday in an initial public offering. The company issued 1.2 million shares at $3.25 a share on Nasdaq. Cruttenden & Co., an Irvine-based investment bank, managed the underwriting. Some portion of the money raised goes to the underwriters; the rest will be used as working capital.
BUSINESS
October 4, 1992 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Something went terribly wrong on the way to the computer systems market. Jamshed (Jim) Farooquee, chief executive of CMS Enhancements Inc., in Irvine knows that all too well. A failed joint venture and other ills have cost his company $17 million in losses for the past two years and forced him to lay off more than 350 employees.
BUSINESS
September 13, 1989 | DAVID OLMOS, Times Staff Writer
Charles W. Missler, chairman of Phoenix Group International, said Tuesday that knowing the right people helped his Irvine-based, high-technology company nail down a deal to supply personal computers to the Soviet Union. But just in case knowing the right people was not enough, Missler said, his small company tried to impress its prospective Soviet customers by flying them to Silicon Valley meetings with corporate chieftains in a leased Lear jet and in a helicopter.
BUSINESS
January 18, 2000 | By ROBIN FIELDS,
Broadcom Corp., an Irvine developer of networking modem chips, has struck a deal with a Milpitas chip maker to license technology that enables high-speed voice transmission over the Internet. LSI Logic Corp. announced the agreement with Broadcom on Monday, but did not disclose the financial terms. The agreement makes Broadcom the most significant customer for LSI's so-called ZSP technology, a blueprint for changing light, heat and other signals into digital computer language, LSI said.
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