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BUSINESS
August 21, 1998 | Associated Press
The antitrust trial against Microsoft will begin next month, two weeks later than planned, a federal judge said. U.S. District Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson agreed to a joint request by Microsoft and the Justice Department to delay the trial until Sept. 23, in part because of the legal fight to let reporters and the public watch the pretrial interviews with Microsoft's billionaire chairman, Bill Gates, and other executives.
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BUSINESS
June 17, 1998 | From Reuters
The U.S. software industry lost $11.4 billion in revenue worldwide last year due to illegal copying of programs such as Microsoft Corp.'s Excel and Adobe Systems Inc.'s Illustrator, according to a study released Tuesday by two industry groups. The study, by the Business Software Alliance and the Software Publishers Assn., found that almost half of all newly installed business programs were pirated. In the United States, 27% of software was pirated, resulting in an estimated $2.
BUSINESS
April 21, 1998 | From Washington Post
Several companies and trade associations critical of Microsoft Corp.'s business practices said Monday that they have banded together to mount an aggressive lobbying campaign against the software giant. The group will encourage federal and state regulators to pursue a broader antitrust case against Microsoft.
BUSINESS
April 7, 1998 | From Reuters
The Justice Department's top antitrust official and his staff will meet with Microsoft Corp. representatives Friday to discuss a possible new antitrust case against the software giant, a person familiar with the case said Monday. Some in the Justice Department believe there is now enough evidence to bring a new case against Microsoft under the nation's antitrust laws, according to the source.
BUSINESS
January 22, 1998 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the face of its growing legal battle with the Justice Department and declining sales in Asia, Microsoft Corp. proved it still could produce stunning financial results, boosting income by 52% in the last quarter of 1997. "It was a super quarter," said Rick Sherlund, analyst at Goldman Sachs, a New York-based brokerage house. With profit of $1.13 billion or 85 cents a share, "they exceeded the Street's earnings estimates again," Sherlund said.
BUSINESS
January 19, 1998 | BETH BERSELLI, WASHINGTON POST
Katherine Mitchell had just plunked down $2,500 for a top-of-the-line desktop computer, so she was more than a little miffed when it went on the fritz. Mitchell, a District of Columbia resident, had no trouble pinpointing the problem--"Control D would do one thing once, and five minutes later it'd do something else," she explained--but as for the cause, she was stumped. Seeking help, Mitchell called the toll-free number for the machine's manufacturer, AST Research Inc. in Irvine.
BUSINESS
November 12, 1997 | RAJIV CHANDRASEKARAN, WASHINGTON POST
The Justice Department's latest antitrust action against software giant Microsoft Corp. is a "perverse" interference that will block the advance of computer technology and hurt consumers, Microsoft said in a harshly worded court filing released Tuesday. Regulators are "taking sides" with Microsoft's competitors in an effort to prevent improvements in its popular Windows software, the company said, calling itself the victim of a Justice Department "smear campaign."
BUSINESS
September 27, 1997 | From Bloomberg News
U.S. software companies accused the Internal Revenue Service Friday of ripping off the tax software they sell to corporate clients. The Software Publishers Assn., which represents software giants Microsoft Corp., Adobe Systems Inc., Netscape Communications Corp. and others, said the IRS takes computer programs that one corporation uses to file its taxes and uses them to improve the way it checks other corporate returns.
BUSINESS
August 8, 1997 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shares of Apple Computer Inc. continued to climb Thursday in the wake of the company's surprising alliance with Microsoft Corp., a move that left others in the industry struggling to find their place in a suddenly altered landscape. Sun Microsystems Inc. and Netscape Communications Corp., in particular, were forced into damage-control mode because of a widespread perception that they had been blindsided by the deal.
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