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BUSINESS
February 3, 1999 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
A top Microsoft Corp. official conceded Tuesday that there are discrepancies in a videotaped demonstration that the company has used in its defense in the antitrust case. Senior Vice President James Allchin admitted under questioning that a video purporting to show a reenactment of a software test he conducted last year appears to have been fouled up.
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BUSINESS
January 11, 1999 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
After weeks of plodding cross-examination of 12 government witnesses, Microsoft Corp. plans a swift counterattack when it begins its defense against federal antitrust charges this week. Before Microsoft even begins to call its own lineup of 12 witnesses, company lawyers will ask U.S. District Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson to dismiss the case. The software giant will argue that America Online Inc.'s planned $4.2-billion purchase of Microsoft archrival Netscape Communications Corp.
BUSINESS
January 7, 1999 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A year ago this week, Hayes Corp. was planning parties to celebrate its historic 20th year in the computer modem business it almost single-handedly created. The company even issued a 20th anniversary commemorative modem, signed by founder Dennis Hayes himself.
BUSINESS
December 31, 1998 | Associated Press
The Clinton administration enacted more lenient rules on the export of powerful data-scrambling technology, used to guarantee privacy of e-mail and credit card sales over the Internet. But critics complained that the relaxed restrictions still leave sensitive data vulnerable to dedicated hackers with sufficient financial resources. The new rules from the Commerce Department allow U.S.
BUSINESS
December 13, 1998 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Despite fears that the world economy is having a long, bad winter and U.S. semiconductor electronics companies are suffering the chills, the stocks of prominent companies such as Intel, Texas Instruments and Advanced Micro Devices are selling at or near 52-week highs. Prices of semiconductor newcomers such as Broadcom and Rambus are soaring. And electronic manufacturing companies such as Solectron, Jabil Circuit and Flextronics all hit new highs in the last week. What's going on?
BUSINESS
November 21, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Microsoft Corp. will release modified versions of its Windows 98 operating system and other software to comply with a court order in a civil lawsuit, though the world's leading software company still might appeal the ruling, company executives said Friday. Microsoft said the changes would have no impact on customers, nor would they affect products that already have been shipped.
BUSINESS
October 28, 1998 | Associated Press
IBM has developed the world's fastest computer, capable of performing 3.9 trillion operations a second and simulating a nuclear bomb test, government officials said Tuesday. The development was to be announced today at the White House. The new supercomputer, dubbed Pacific Blue and built for the Energy Department, will enable scientists to maintain the reliability of atomic weapons stockpiles without having to conduct nuclear tests, the officials said, speaking on condition of anonymity.
BUSINESS
October 16, 1998 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
The high-tech industry scored two big victories on Capitol Hill on Thursday as lawmakers approved a three-year moratorium on new Internet taxes and gave the final OK to a separate measure that will let thousands more skilled foreign workers into the United States.
BUSINESS
October 12, 1998 | GARY CHAPMAN
The Microsoft antitrust trial scheduled to begin this month will no doubt dominate high-tech industry news as an epic and historic battle between the dominant company in the Information Age and the U.S. Justice Department. But, like most other news stories about high tech in newspapers, magazines and on the World Wide Web, this legal battle obscures deeper problems in the relationship between our high-tech companies and the country in which they operate.
BUSINESS
August 29, 1998 | From Associated Press
Government lawyers spent a second day Friday questioning Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates in preparation for a trial next month of their antitrust suit against the software giant. Gates, the world's richest man with more than an estimated $50 billion in assets, was questioned for nine hours Friday in a conference room at the company's headquarters near Seattle.
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