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Computer Industry United States

BUSINESS
December 13, 1998 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Despite fears that the world economy is having a long, bad winter and U.S. semiconductor electronics companies are suffering the chills, the stocks of prominent companies such as Intel, Texas Instruments and Advanced Micro Devices are selling at or near 52-week highs. Prices of semiconductor newcomers such as Broadcom and Rambus are soaring. And electronic manufacturing companies such as Solectron, Jabil Circuit and Flextronics all hit new highs in the last week. What's going on?
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BUSINESS
November 21, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Microsoft Corp. will release modified versions of its Windows 98 operating system and other software to comply with a court order in a civil lawsuit, though the world's leading software company still might appeal the ruling, company executives said Friday. Microsoft said the changes would have no impact on customers, nor would they affect products that already have been shipped.
BUSINESS
October 28, 1998 | Associated Press
IBM has developed the world's fastest computer, capable of performing 3.9 trillion operations a second and simulating a nuclear bomb test, government officials said Tuesday. The development was to be announced today at the White House. The new supercomputer, dubbed Pacific Blue and built for the Energy Department, will enable scientists to maintain the reliability of atomic weapons stockpiles without having to conduct nuclear tests, the officials said, speaking on condition of anonymity.
BUSINESS
October 16, 1998 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
The high-tech industry scored two big victories on Capitol Hill on Thursday as lawmakers approved a three-year moratorium on new Internet taxes and gave the final OK to a separate measure that will let thousands more skilled foreign workers into the United States.
BUSINESS
August 21, 1998 | Associated Press
The antitrust trial against Microsoft will begin next month, two weeks later than planned, a federal judge said. U.S. District Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson agreed to a joint request by Microsoft and the Justice Department to delay the trial until Sept. 23, in part because of the legal fight to let reporters and the public watch the pretrial interviews with Microsoft's billionaire chairman, Bill Gates, and other executives.
BUSINESS
June 17, 1998 | From Reuters
The U.S. software industry lost $11.4 billion in revenue worldwide last year due to illegal copying of programs such as Microsoft Corp.'s Excel and Adobe Systems Inc.'s Illustrator, according to a study released Tuesday by two industry groups. The study, by the Business Software Alliance and the Software Publishers Assn., found that almost half of all newly installed business programs were pirated. In the United States, 27% of software was pirated, resulting in an estimated $2.
BUSINESS
April 21, 1998 | From Washington Post
Several companies and trade associations critical of Microsoft Corp.'s business practices said Monday that they have banded together to mount an aggressive lobbying campaign against the software giant. The group will encourage federal and state regulators to pursue a broader antitrust case against Microsoft.
BUSINESS
April 7, 1998 | From Reuters
The Justice Department's top antitrust official and his staff will meet with Microsoft Corp. representatives Friday to discuss a possible new antitrust case against the software giant, a person familiar with the case said Monday. Some in the Justice Department believe there is now enough evidence to bring a new case against Microsoft under the nation's antitrust laws, according to the source.
BUSINESS
January 22, 1998 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the face of its growing legal battle with the Justice Department and declining sales in Asia, Microsoft Corp. proved it still could produce stunning financial results, boosting income by 52% in the last quarter of 1997. "It was a super quarter," said Rick Sherlund, analyst at Goldman Sachs, a New York-based brokerage house. With profit of $1.13 billion or 85 cents a share, "they exceeded the Street's earnings estimates again," Sherlund said.
BUSINESS
January 19, 1998 | BETH BERSELLI, WASHINGTON POST
Katherine Mitchell had just plunked down $2,500 for a top-of-the-line desktop computer, so she was more than a little miffed when it went on the fritz. Mitchell, a District of Columbia resident, had no trouble pinpointing the problem--"Control D would do one thing once, and five minutes later it'd do something else," she explained--but as for the cause, she was stumped. Seeking help, Mitchell called the toll-free number for the machine's manufacturer, AST Research Inc. in Irvine.
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