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BUSINESS
May 29, 2000 | ELIZABETH DOUGLASS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A new wave of companies is steadily staking claim to a piece of the communications future. For now, these promising firms are mostly hidden among a glut of "dot-com" ventures. That obscurity, however, is not likely to last. That's because this group of companies is harnessing the power of next-generation networks that carry phone and Internet traffic together, making possible a host of new services that combine the strengths of both phones and computers.
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WORLD
December 22, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON - After news reports that the National Security Agency had secretly monitored German Chancellor Angela Merkel's cellphone calls, America's top intelligence official was asked why congressional oversight committees were kept in the dark. Shouldn't Congress have been briefed, Rep. Adam B. Schiff (D-Burbank) asked James R. Clapper, the director of national intelligence, about a spying operation that would embarrass the U.S. government if exposed? "Well, sir, there are many things we do in intelligence that, if revealed, would have the potential for all kinds of blowback," Clapper replied at a House Intelligence Committee hearing in October.
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BUSINESS
November 25, 1986 | JAMES BATES, Times Staff Writer
Micom Systems built its business by getting computers to talk. Now it wants to get them to understand each other better. The Simi Valley-based company, trying to become a leader in one of the data communications industry's growing areas, is stepping up development of components used both to link different brands of computers and computers scattered among remote locations into smooth electronic networks. The need for better data communications systems is clear.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 2013 | By Michael Finnegan
Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti has set up a new command center to minimize the threat that hackers, terrorists or foreign enemies will disrupt water, power, transportation and public safety systems. In an executive directive creating the Cyber Intrusion Command Center, Garcetti cited warnings from the Obama administration that computer attacks aimed at crucial infrastructure could cause panic and destruction and effectively paralyze the nation. Working with the FBI and U.S. Secret Service, the command center will serve as a "rapid reaction force" to respond to cyberattacks, Garcetti said.
NEWS
February 21, 1989
HOW TO PARTICIPATE 1. Register with the city and sign a form pledging to obey computer laws and releasing the city from any liability. 2. The city issues each participant a user identification number and a 15-page instruction manual. The resident chooses a password. 3. Residents can use any kind of home computer, or ones set up in public centers, to access the system and need no special software--merely a modem to connect the computer with the city system by telephone. 4.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1996 | DAVID E. BRADY
Touting a new $16-million computer network as a vital tool to bring the Los Angeles Police Department into the information age, Mayor Richard Riordan and Chief Willie Williams visited a Northridge police station Monday to unveil the system. Standing in the Devonshire Division's roll call room beside a television screen displaying the LAPD's new local network, Riordan noted that the computers will dramatically reduce the amount of time officers spend filling out repetitive forms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1996 | MIMI KO CRUZ
An educational technology plan for hooking up classroom computers to a districtwide network was approved by school trustees this week. The Fullerton School District plan tells schools how they may use $200,000 allocated for the network last year. Each classroom in every school will get a network-capable computer and eventually be connected so that students, teachers and administrators can communicate and share instructional materials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1994 | MARY LOU PICKEL
Computers are almost an obsession for Dorothy Wallace. Ever since the 77-year-old retired hospital administrator started taking computer classes three months ago, hardly a day goes by that she doesn't work to perfect her skills. "I haven't felt this good since I learned to bowl at age 63," she said while waiting for a desktop publishing class to begin at the Morningside of Fullerton retirement community.
BUSINESS
June 17, 1987 | Associated Press
International Business Machines on Tuesday unveiled a grand plan for computer communications with what it called "the largest communications software announcement in its history." The new products should help IBM against competitors such as Digital Equipment by strengthening the giant company where it is weakest, in the growing area of computer networking, analysts said.
NEWS
December 1, 1988 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
For nearly a 24-hour period ending Wednesday night, the Defense Communications Agency severed the links between two nationwide computer networks that were disabled by a computer virus Nov. 3. There was no immediate explanation for the separation of the two networks, which are used by university, industry and military researchers for nonclassified communications.
WORLD
May 15, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON -- A Chinese military unit that a private U.S. computer security company accused of launching more than 115 cyber attacks against American companies over seven years has resumed hacking after a three-month hiatus, the firm's chief security officer said Wednesday. The clandestine army unit, known as Unit 61398, “went quiet for a while -- they changed the nature of their activities, they removed some of the tools that they had been using inside of different companies,” said Richard Bejtlich of Mandiant, which specializes in defending companies from cyber attacks and purging malware from computer networks that have been breached.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 2012 | By Angel Jennings, Los Angeles Times
OXON HILL, Md. - A team of skilled teenagers from Highland Park traveled across the country recently to test its ability to protect American interests from potentially dangerous attacks. Its only weapon: laptops. Cloaked in blue oversized hoodies, a handful of students from Benjamin Franklin High School hunched over their computer screens, armed with the knowledge to thwart hackers from infiltrating computer networks and stealing sensitive information. At CyberPatriot: The National High School Cyber Defense Competition, held here, a stone's throw from the nation's capital, students mostly played defense against sophisticated computer whizzes with ill intentions.
BUSINESS
March 6, 2012 | By Nathan Olivarez-Giles
This post has been corrected. See the note at the bottom for details. It took one simple mistake for Hector Xavier Monsegur, a hacker who goes by the name Sabu, to get caught by the FBI. On Tuesday, the world found out that Monsegur's mistake is sending ripples through the hacking community and into high-profile groups such as LulzSec, AntiSec and Anonymous. Six alleged hackers from those three prominent collectives have been charged in New York for executing a series of online attacks against the likes of Sony, Fox, PBS, Bethesda Softworks, the Central Intelligence Agency and a number of financial institutions such as Visa, MasterCard and PayPal.
BUSINESS
May 12, 2011 | By Ken Dilanian and W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
After years of warnings that the U.S. is vulnerable to a cyber attack that could blow up city blocks, erase bank data and fry power grids, the White House said it would call on industry to set standards for securing computer networks that run the nation's critical infrastructure. The proposal also offers states and operators of power plants, electrical grids and other critical infrastructures help from the Department of Homeland Security in building better defenses and fixing damage from cyber attacks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2011 | By Jack Leonard, Los Angeles Times
As a child, Michael Hinkle loved tinkering with computers. On visits to the Midwest to see his mother and stepfather, the boy would promise to make their computers work faster. It was only after he left for home in Southern California that the couple would discover that nothing worked. "Everywhere he went, he left a trail of broken computers behind him," his stepfather Bob Jakowinicz said with a laugh. But as Hinkle grew, so did his talent with computers. After high school, he joined the Air Force and was assigned to his unit's Internet and computer networks, winning achievement medals for his work.
BUSINESS
August 21, 2009 | David Pierson
When Jiang Dabao lost his right hand to a molding machine three years ago, his factory boss said he wasn't eligible for workers' compensation. Unemployable, Jiang whiled away his days in the Internet bars that thrive here in China's manufacturing heartland. Eventually he tapped into an online forum on QQ, a popular social networking service, where he found a workers advocacy group that helped him win a $30,000 settlement. "Before I got hurt, I had no idea how to use a computer or even the Internet," said Jiang, who identified himself by his childhood nickname for fear of official reprisal.
NEWS
December 14, 1994 | AMY HARMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alarmed by the growing presence of hate groups in cyberspace, the Simon Wiesenthal Center Tuesday sent a letter to the Prodigy on-line computer service protesting the "continued use of Prodigy by bigots to promote their agendas of hate." The Los Angeles-based center said it has tracked increasing activity over the last few months by more than 50 hate groups using on-line services and the popular Internet global computer network.
NATIONAL
June 24, 2009 | Julian E. Barnes
Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates on Tuesday ordered the creation of a military command to oversee cyberspace in order to better defend military computer networks as well as pool capabilities for attacking the networks of other countries. For now, the U.S. Cyber Command will remain a part of the military's Strategic Command, which also oversees the nation's nuclear arsenal. But experts said the move is likely to be a precursor to setting up an independent command.
NATIONAL
November 28, 2008 | Julian E. Barnes, Barnes is a writer in our Washington bureau.
Senior military leaders took the exceptional step of briefing President Bush this week on a severe and widespread electronic attack on Defense Department computers that may have originated in Russia -- an incursion that posed unusual concern among commanders and raised potential implications for national security. Defense officials would not describe the extent of damage inflicted on military networks. But they said that the attack struck hard at networks within U.S.
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